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Geta

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  • Zack
    I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe socks. I was trying to
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 11 1:54 PM
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      I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the
      more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe
      socks. I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so
      slick that I can't see actually using them in battle. Am I doing
      something wrong? Or are they not for use in combat?
    • makiwara_no_yetsuko
      ... Geta are the clogs. Zori are the sandals. I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so ... What are the bottoms made out of? There may be a
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 11 4:14 PM
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Zack" <tskjuggalo4life@y...> wrote:
        > I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the
        > more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe
        > socks.
        Geta are the clogs. Zori are the sandals.

        I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so
        > slick that I can't see actually using them in battle. Am I doing
        > something wrong? Or are they not for use in combat?

        What are the bottoms made out of? There may be a way to rough them up
        for every day use.

        Hopefully some of our heavy fighters will hit the list at some point
        with information on what they wear, but trying to fight in any sort of
        sandals sounds like a Really Bad Idea. My roommate lost two toenails
        when he legged his opponent and said opponent went to his knees,
        landing on my roommate's feet.

        Go to http://www.yamakaminari.com/ and click on "Projects" in the menu
        at left. Two clan members have constructed kegutsu, fur covered
        fighting boots.

        Makiwara
      • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
        ... Geta aren t for everyday use--they are more like rain boots , for the mud and similar inclement areas. They should NOT be fought in. Any marshal that
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 12 7:15 PM
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          > What are the bottoms made out of? There may be a way to rough them up
          > for every day use.
          >
          > Hopefully some of our heavy fighters will hit the list at some point
          > with information on what they wear, but trying to fight in any sort of
          > sandals sounds like a Really Bad Idea. My roommate lost two toenails
          > when he legged his opponent and said opponent went to his knees,
          > landing on my roommate's feet.

          Geta aren't for everyday use--they are more like 'rain boots', for the
          mud and similar inclement areas. They should NOT be fought in. Any
          marshal that passes them as safe for fighting should not be allowed to
          marshal, imho.

          Zori are also not used for fighting (not as big a problem, imho,
          because your more likely to just step out of them than to end up
          falling and twisting your ankle because of it). They do not meet any
          kind of 'rigid protection' rule--some kingdoms are more picky about
          footwear than others.

          Waraji would be appropriate. These sandals tie onto your feet. You
          definitely want tough feet before fighting in them, as your toes tend
          to hang over the edge, and if there are any sharp bits of stone, etc.
          it can cause problems unless your feet are used to being abused
          (kendo, kicking--and wearing geta alot--seems to help). They do not
          provide any sort of protection, however, and an armoured knee or
          hiking boot that comes down on your foot will hit bare skin.

          Ideally, I recommend trying to take some form of modern shoe and
          dressing it up to look like kegutsu (look that term up on Google, and
          several helpful sites pop up right off the bat). Try that, and see
          how it goes.

          -Ii
        • Althea DeGrimm
          I found this site rather informative.. http://www.egeorgeonline.com/getapage/ I don t believe you have geta in the traditional sense there... I recently
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 14 7:12 AM
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            I found this site rather informative..

            http://www.egeorgeonline.com/getapage/

            I don't believe you have geta in the traditional sense there...

            'I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the
            more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe
            socks. I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so
            slick that I can't see actually using them in battle. Am I doing
            something wrong? Or are they not for use in combat?'

            From what I see, I wouldn't use geta in battle at all.....

            Only in Anime would one see geta used successfully in battle...unless
            one is *very* experienced in walking in them....just *my* opinion, of
            course...

            Althea
          • Otagiri Tatsuzou
            ... I really not sure to what you are referring. I fight in the SCA in something similar to these (but all brown):
            Message 5 of 23 , Jun 14 8:28 AM
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              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Zack" <tskjuggalo4life@y...> wrote:
              > I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the
              > more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe
              > socks. I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so
              > slick that I can't see actually using them in battle. Am I doing
              > something wrong? Or are they not for use in combat?

              I really not sure to what you are referring.

              I fight in the SCA in something similar to these (but all brown):
              http://www.olympiasports.net/graphics/product_images/pFOGXREF2-368530reg.jpg

              I have made and fought in straw sandles known as waraji similar to the
              following. I don't believe waraji are SCA legal for combat. I had no
              trouble running on pavement and pea gravel. I had no trouble fighting
              in dry grass.
              http://www.e-budostore.com/images/waraji-wearing.jpg

              Otagiri
            • Rick Howard
              Ohayo, Making the same assumptions that Otagiri-dono is making re: this conversation... The SCA Marshal s Handbook (12/01 Armor Standards) touches on the
              Message 6 of 23 , Jun 14 4:17 PM
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                Ohayo,

                Making the same assumptions that Otagiri-dono is making re: this
                conversation...

                The SCA Marshal's Handbook (12/01 Armor Standards) touches on the subject of
                footwear:
                A7c: All individuals will wear sturdy footwear while engaged in combat
                activities.

                I have fought in waraji with deer skin tabi for years without Calontir or
                Knowne World marshal's saying a word about it. That may have just been my
                good karma at work, though. ;-) That being said, check with your Earl
                Marshal if you are uncertain about your kingdom's specific armor
                conventions.

                Waraji have performed well for me also. As far as traction goes, concrete
                gym floors have proven to be a tad slippery. With regard to protection for
                your feet, it is minimal to none - They do not provide any crush resistance,
                ankle or arch support, etc.


                Yoshi


                Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
                things.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Otagiri Tatsuzou
                Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2005 10:28 AM
                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Zack" <tskjuggalo4life@y...> wrote:
                > I recently bought a pair of geta, not the wooden clog type but the
                > more sandalesque ones made from reeds that come with the split-toe
                > socks. I was trying to walk in them and the bottoms of them are so
                > slick that I can't see actually using them in battle. Am I doing
                > something wrong? Or are they not for use in combat?

                I really not sure to what you are referring.

                I fight in the SCA in something similar to these (but all brown):
                http://www.olympiasports.net/graphics/product_images/pFOGXREF2-368530reg.jpg

                I have made and fought in straw sandles known as waraji similar to the
                following. I don't believe waraji are SCA legal for combat. I had no
                trouble running on pavement and pea gravel. I had no trouble fighting
                in dry grass.
                http://www.e-budostore.com/images/waraji-wearing.jpg

                Otagiri
              • Solveig
                Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... The problem with kegutsu is that they are highly inappropriate for the vast bulk of fighters in the Society. While they
                Message 7 of 23 , Jun 15 10:05 PM
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                  Ii dono!

                  Greetings from Solveig!
                  >Ideally, I recommend trying to take some form of modern shoe and
                  >dressing it up to look like kegutsu (look that term up on Google, and
                  >several helpful sites pop up right off the bat). Try that, and see
                  >how it goes.
                  The problem with kegutsu is that they are highly inappropriate for
                  the vast bulk of fighters in the Society. While they are not quite
                  the equivalent of wearing golden armour, they along with chaps made
                  of deer skin do pretty much declare higher status than most can
                  rightfully pretend to.
                  --

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar

                  +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                  | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                  | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
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                • Solveig
                  Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! To the best of my recolection, sushi chefs wear white rubber boots like many other cooks. The people that were famous
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jun 15 10:09 PM
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                    Noble Cousins!

                    Greetings from Solveig! To the best of my recolection, sushi chefs
                    wear white rubber boots like many other cooks. The people that were
                    famous for wearing tall geta were stylish university students of the
                    Meiji period.
                    --

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar

                    +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                    | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                    | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                    | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
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                    | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
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                  • Solveig
                    Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! ... There are of course numerous battle paintings showing soldiers wearing waraji. I was going to mention that I do not
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jun 15 10:12 PM
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                      Noble Cousins!

                      Greetings from Solveig!
                      >http://www.e-budostore.com/images/waraji-wearing.jpg
                      There are of course numerous battle paintings showing soldiers
                      wearing waraji. I was going to mention that I do not believe them to
                      be list legal. As I recall, footwear was pretty much required as
                      early as AS XI or AS XII in much of the Society.
                      --

                      Your Humble Servant
                      Solveig Throndardottir
                      Amateur Scholar

                      +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                      | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
                      +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                      | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
                      | trash by my email filters. |
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                    • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
                      ... Really, I d never really considered that a problem, considering we are all supposed to be noble . I m not sure that kegutsu would say much more than that
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jun 16 5:24 PM
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                        On 6/16/05, Solveig <nostrand@...> wrote:
                        > Ii dono!
                        >
                        > Greetings from Solveig!
                        > >Ideally, I recommend trying to take some form of modern shoe and
                        > >dressing it up to look like kegutsu (look that term up on Google, and
                        > >several helpful sites pop up right off the bat). Try that, and see
                        > >how it goes.
                        > The problem with kegutsu is that they are highly inappropriate for
                        > the vast bulk of fighters in the Society. While they are not quite
                        > the equivalent of wearing golden armour, they along with chaps made
                        > of deer skin do pretty much declare higher status than most can
                        > rightfully pretend to.

                        Really, I'd never really considered that a problem, considering we are
                        all supposed to be 'noble'. I'm not sure that kegutsu would say much
                        more than that you are wealthy enough to afford them, but I'll take a
                        look and see what I can find out.

                        -Ii
                      • Barbara Nostrand
                        Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... The default degree of nobility in the Society has been rather low for a long time, and has, if anything, gotten lower not
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jun 16 9:15 PM
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                          Ii dono!

                          Greetings from Solveig!

                          > Really, I'd never really considered that a problem, considering we are
                          > all supposed to be 'noble'. I'm not sure that kegutsu would say much
                          > more than that you are wealthy enough to afford them, but I'll take a
                          > look and see what I can find out.

                          The default degree of nobility in the Society has been rather low for a
                          long time, and has, if anything, gotten lower not higher over the
                          years. My general understanding is that the default level of nobility
                          ca AS XI was that of the English "Gentry" that is younger sons of minor
                          "lords of the manor". Basically, one step above a commoner. I recall
                          somewhat vividly being rather disappointed at not being a "lady" in the
                          Society, but rather some sort of riff-raff which barely made it into
                          the feast hall. The basic equivalent to this sort of thing for medieval
                          Japanese is in my opinion that you are a member of the buke, and your
                          father may receive a salary of about 10 koku. For purposes of the Heian
                          period, maybe your father can be of the tenth court rank or you might
                          be one of those "strong fellows" that Farris writes about.

                          Regardless. You just don't see them all of that often. You see hoards
                          of people running around barefoot or wearing sandals. The boots I
                          described, appear to be a bit more common as members of the gate and
                          palace guards are shown wearing them. This is the sort of post that a
                          soldier type out in the provinces might hope to be appointed to.

                          Your Humble Servant
                          Solveig Throndardottir
                          Amateur Scholar

                          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                          | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                          | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                          | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
                          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                          | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
                          | the trash by my email filters. |
                          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • James Eckman
                          ... Cool links. What s the traditional wood used? Poplar is probably not a bad choice though... Maybe one giant chunk of basswood instead? It s a very white
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jul 10, 2006
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                            > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

                            Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? Poplar is probably not a
                            bad choice though... Maybe one giant chunk of basswood instead? It's a
                            very white wood, light, fine grained and not splintery.

                            I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!


                            Jim Eckman
                          • Rick Howard
                            Ohayo! Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia, photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                              Ohayo!

                              Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia,
                              photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
                              into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss paulownia as a
                              common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I have are
                              light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                              Any other wood being commonly used that anyone knows about?

                              Yoshi



                              Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                              Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
                              things.


                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                              James Eckman
                              Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 1:15 AM
                              To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                              > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

                              Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? SNIP

                              I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!


                              Jim Eckman
                            • Susan Campbell
                              Paulownia wood is an excellent choice for geta. The following link has the mechanical properties and common uses of paulownia wood, and while geta aren t
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                Paulownia wood is an excellent choice for geta. The following link has the mechanical properties and common uses of paulownia wood, and while geta aren't specifically listed, you can see that they and other handicrafts could come from the butt ends of other projects.

                                http://idrinfo.idrc.ca/Archive/Corpdocs/071235/071235k.htm

                                YIS,

                                Mori Matsunomae



                                Rick Howard <rhoward@...> wrote: Ohayo!

                                Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia,
                                photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
                                into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss paulownia as a
                                common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I have are
                                light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                                Any other wood being commonly used that anyone knows about?

                                Yoshi

                                Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                                Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
                                things.

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                James Eckman
                                Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 1:15 AM
                                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                                > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

                                Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? SNIP

                                I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!

                                Jim Eckman






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • wodeford
                                ... Pawlonia, I believe. It s ludicrously light for its tensile strength. (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer s was like picking up a cheap
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:

                                  > Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
                                  Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
                                  (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
                                  picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
                                  furniture.)

                                  Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
                                • Barbara Nostrand
                                  Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Could you possibly share references? Your Humble Servant Solveig Throndardottir Amateur Scholar
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                    Noble Cousin!

                                    Greetings from Solveig!

                                    > Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are
                                    > paulownia,
                                    > photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to
                                    > be made
                                    > into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss
                                    > paulownia as a
                                    > common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I
                                    > have are
                                    > light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                                    Could you possibly share references?

                                    Your Humble Servant
                                    Solveig Throndardottir
                                    Amateur Scholar
                                  • Susan Campbell
                                    To purchase Paulownia wood, since Home Depot is unlikely to carry it, you may want to check here, http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                      To purchase Paulownia wood, since Home Depot is unlikely to carry it, you may want to check here, http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html

                                      There are lots of places that do carry more exotic woods.

                                      Mori Matsunomae

                                      Rick Howard <rhoward@...> wrote: Ohayo!

                                      Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia,
                                      photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
                                      into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss paulownia as a
                                      common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I have are
                                      light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                                      Any other wood being commonly used that anyone knows about?

                                      Yoshi

                                      Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                                      Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
                                      things.

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                      James Eckman
                                      Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 1:15 AM
                                      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                                      > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

                                      Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? SNIP

                                      I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!

                                      Jim Eckman






                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Barbara Nostrand
                                      Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! The archaeological site in question has published findings. These should include estimated dates and stuff like that.
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                        Noble Cousins!

                                        Greetings from Solveig! The archaeological site in question has
                                        published findings. These should include estimated dates and stuff
                                        like that.

                                        Your Humble Servant
                                        Solveig Throndardottir
                                        Amateur Scholar

                                        We have already published the excavation reports of the Kusado Sengen-
                                        cho site in five volumes. Each volume has an english summary. They
                                        have been collected in some university libraries in the U.S.A. Please
                                        refer to the libraries below. Harvard Yenching Library
                                        Harvard University
                                        2 Divinity Avenue
                                        Cambridge, Mass. 02138
                                        U.S.A.

                                         East Asian Library
                                        University of California
                                        Berkeley, California 94720
                                        U.S.A.

                                         Asia Library

                                        The University of Michigan
                                        University Library
                                        Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1205
                                        U.S.A.



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Elaine Koogler
                                        ... It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the Japanese,
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                          wodeford wrote:
                                          > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >> Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
                                          >>
                                          > Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
                                          > (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
                                          > picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
                                          > furniture.)
                                          >
                                          > Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown
                                          here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the
                                          Japanese, including serving as one of the mon for the Empress! The good
                                          news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish. If you
                                          "google "Empress Tree", you should be able to find several nurseries
                                          that carry them. I've got several growing in my yard!

                                          Kiri
                                        • rhoward@dwx.com
                                          Hai, I started typing up a bibliography before heading out to the office. Once done, I ll send it out. Yoshi Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d Ennui,
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                            Hai, I started typing up a bibliography before heading out to the office. Once done, I'll send it
                                            out.

                                            Yoshi

                                            Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                                            Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient things.

                                            ------- Original Message -------
                                            From : Barbara Nostrand[mailto:nostrand@...]
                                            Sent : 7/11/2006 8:47:24 AM
                                            To : sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                                            Cc :
                                            Subject : RE: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                                            Noble Cousin!

                                            Greetings from Solveig!

                                            > Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are
                                            > paulownia,
                                            > photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to
                                            > be made
                                            > into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss
                                            > paulownia as a
                                            > common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I
                                            > have are
                                            > light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                                            Could you possibly share references?

                                            Your Humble Servant
                                            Solveig Throndardottir
                                            Amateur Scholar




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                                          • wodeford
                                            ... It s that whole having a yard to grow it in thing, though. Saionji no Hanae, apartment dweller.
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1@...> wrote:
                                              > The good news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish.

                                              It's that whole having a yard to grow it in thing, though.

                                              Saionji no Hanae, apartment dweller.
                                            • Susan Campbell
                                              Hmmm, my earlier replies may not have gone through. 1. This link is to the structure of paulownia wood. It is ideal for construction of furniture and geta.
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                                                Hmmm, my earlier replies may not have gone through.

                                                1. This link is to the structure of paulownia wood. It is ideal for construction of furniture and geta. http://idrinfo.idrc.ca/Archive/Corpdocs/071235/071235k.htm

                                                2. Paulonia wood is sold in this country. It seems to be grown mostly in Georgia, but here is the one source that I found. The prices seem pretty reasonable. http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html

                                                I hope that these were of interest.

                                                YIS,

                                                Mori Matsunoma

                                                Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1@...> wrote: wodeford wrote:
                                                > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >> Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
                                                >>
                                                > Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
                                                > (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
                                                > picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
                                                > furniture.)
                                                >
                                                > Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown
                                                here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the
                                                Japanese, including serving as one of the mon for the Empress! The good
                                                news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish. If you
                                                "google "Empress Tree", you should be able to find several nurseries
                                                that carry them. I've got several growing in my yard!

                                                Kiri





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                                              • Carey G
                                                I sent this earlier and it hasn t showed up on the list yet so if it shows up twice I apologize. I was wondering if anyone had any references or images for the
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Apr 27, 2012
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                                                  I sent this earlier and it hasn't showed up on the list yet so if it shows up twice I apologize.

                                                  I was wondering if anyone had any references or images for the type of geta with the two pieces that elevate the shoe off the ground? An example of what I'm talking about can be seen here http://www.photography-match.com/wallpapers/4866_geta/ I am trying to have at least a little bit of documentation for each of my accessories.
                                                  Thanks
                                                  Agnes
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