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Re: [SCA-JML] A bunch of questions(was:Spiffy book )

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  • Joshua Badgley
    ... So a lord might use it to a servant, but not to a stranger... or at least to another member of the warrior caste; peasants were probably fair game, right?
    Message 1 of 46 , Oct 3, 2000
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      On Tue, 3 Oct 2000, Barbara Nostrand wrote:

      > >Do you use honorific for yourself when talking to those beneath you? I
      > >was never clear on that, although in modern times there rarely is such a
      > >case, AFAIK (unless you are dealing with less savory elements).
      >
      > I suppose that you could do it. However, I would not generally advise
      > it unless your status was really unassailable.

      So a lord might use it to a servant, but not to a stranger... or at least
      to another member of the warrior caste; peasants were probably fair game,
      right?

      > Consequently, please try to come up with a name with the following
      > structure:
      >
      > <surname> <yobina> <nanori>

      Thank you thank you thank you! That's the kind of stuff I need to learn
      about. I was wondering about 'Kenshin' because I liked the way it sounded
      but was leary of it for other reasons; thus checking up on it.

      This also explained another thing that I've noticed (Hideyoshi and
      Hideyori, Nobutsuna and Nobunaga, Ieyasu and Iemitsu etc. [IIRC])

      > Takeda and Katou are just fine. And, I suppose that Ii is fine
      > as well. So are Tanaka, Iguchi, Nakata, &c. So, just pick whichever
      > one that you like.
      >
      > Yobina are common use names and are what people who are intimate
      > enough to use your name at all might call you. The most stereotypical
      > of these names are the Charlie Chan Sons names #1 son, #2 son, &c
      > with possibly a bit of decorative prefix. Also, #2 son of #3 son
      > is also possible. The nanori were things like, Hideyoshi, Nobutaka,
      > Yoritomo, Hidetada, &c. These names are frequently written with two
      > kanji and take kun-yomi readings. One of the two kanji is often
      > inheritted from your father. In this case, the letter is called a
      > tsuji. (As I recall, that is what it is called.) Note. If you want
      > to include an animal in your name, the yobina is a good place to
      > do it.

      Hmmm, it seems that you most often see the nanori when reading history
      books. I'll have to look for some good yobina, then. Thanks again.

      -Godric Logan
    • Marc Choronzey
      That s another one I forgot to ask about: Does anybody have a reliable yoroi hitatare pattern? -Shimaha.
      Message 46 of 46 , Oct 9, 2000
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        That's another one I forgot to ask about:

        Does anybody have a reliable yoroi hitatare pattern?

        -Shimaha.
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