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Re: [SCA-JML] A bunch of questions(was:Spiffy book )

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  • Joshua Badgley
    ... Ahhh... here is my big problem grammatically; I find myself wanting to treat -tai as an i-adjective--bad Godric. ... Doh! My other bad. Let me see if I
    Message 1 of 46 , Oct 3, 2000
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      On Mon, 2 Oct 2000, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

      > The big thing is, if it can't have the "de/ni," it can't have "gozaru" -- and
      > "yomitaku de gozaru" is an impossible construction. The thing is, to use
      > gozaru, it has to follow either a noun, or an adjective.
      >
      > (Note: one can now actually say "yomitai desu" or "yomitai da naa..." but
      > that's when you're talking to yourself, or being VERY informal, like talking
      > to your dad when he brings home a copy of Playbushi. { g } )

      Ahhh... here is my big problem grammatically; I find myself wanting to
      treat '-tai' as an i-adjective--bad Godric.

      > (BTW, gozaru isn't the *humble* form of aru/ari; it's the *honorific* form of
      > aru/ari. )

      Doh! My other bad. Let me see if I can recall this correctly: "go-" is
      the honorific, "za" was something like 'here', and "aru" was 'to exist',
      is that correct (gozaaru->gozaru)

      So, when talking about oneself to an equal or greater, should one use
      'aru' and 'zonjiru', and then 'gozaru' and 'gozonjiru' when talking about
      equals or greater?

      Do you use honorific for yourself when talking to those beneath you? I
      was never clear on that, although in modern times there rarely is such a
      case, AFAIK (unless you are dealing with less savory elements).


      I also have some other questions I need to ask. I have obtained patterns
      for nagabakama and another style; the second is Fujiwara kyohirakou
      shiroheiken-awasebakama. This latter seems more like the style of hakama
      seen today, less the stiff backboard that I'm not sure existed before the
      Tokugawa.

      In another book I found pictures of kobakama and karibakama and was
      wondering how they differed from the two above, and what would be
      appropriate to a man of the mid-late 16th Century. I am thinking that
      Kobakama is the way to go for me, but I'm not sure how to bunch it at the
      bottom. Other illustrations seem to show a cord that runs through the
      bottom hem. Any suggestions?


      Finally, on the subject of names, I am looking at several names and the
      kanji for it. For family names I am looking at Takeda (Takeda Shingen),
      Katou (Katou Kiyomasa), or Ii (Ii Naomasa), all of which I know the kanji
      for. For first names I am looking at Kenshin (Uesugi Kenshin), and
      haven't found another personal name that I like as well yet.
      Unfortunately, I can't find Uesugi Kenshin's kanji. Help would be
      appreciated.

      -Godric Logan
    • Marc Choronzey
      That s another one I forgot to ask about: Does anybody have a reliable yoroi hitatare pattern? -Shimaha.
      Message 46 of 46 , Oct 9, 2000
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        That's another one I forgot to ask about:

        Does anybody have a reliable yoroi hitatare pattern?

        -Shimaha.
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