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Re: kitsune's wedding and various

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  • James Eckman
    ... Sounds like an interesting book, I will have to check it out. I have two poor references on the subject: Japanese Mythology by Juliet Piggott Japanese
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 27, 2005
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      > From: "firedramage" <FlameDragon75@...>
      >
      > Well, I have found an book that may help. Called " Handbook of
      >Japanese Mythology " by Micheal Ashkenazi. The ISBN# 1-57607-467-6 or
      >the e-book # 1-57607-468-4. You can find the e-book at this address
      >http://abc-clio.com
      >
      Sounds like an interesting book, I will have to check it out.

      I have two poor references on the subject:

      "Japanese Mythology" by Juliet Piggott
      "Japanese Ghosts & Demons" edited by Stephen Aldiss

      Both are well illustrated but not very deep, don't pay a lot of money
      for them. No references to the wedding!

      >>>Sunday school Buddhism ;)
      >>
      >>
      >
      >But of course! However, it is still a pretty decent introduction and
      >the clothing isn't too far off from a Japanese point of view.
      >
      >
      More a comment on American perceptions of Zen Buddhism. Basically if you
      grow up in it and aren't very committed it's the same as Western
      churches down to Sunday school. About as esoteric as steak and potato
      dinner in Kansas.

      Idiot in training,
      Jim Eckman
    • sean_somers2002
      ... There s a glut of books on Japanese mythology (read: quasi- ethnographic folkloric-y static culture compilation) on the market right now. I see that
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 28, 2005
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@c...>
        wrote:
        >
        > > From: "firedramage" <FlameDragon75@m...>
        > >
        > > Well, I have found an book that may help. Called " Handbook of
        > >Japanese Mythology " by Micheal Ashkenazi. The ISBN# 1-57607-467-6


        There's a glut of books on Japanese 'mythology' (read: quasi-
        ethnographic folkloric-y static culture compilation) on the market
        right now. I see that Tuttle is reprinting most of Lafcadio Hearn's
        (Koizumi Yakumo) books. There's some books on Japanese folklore . . .
        written by Japanese people - maybe something in trying on of those. I
        guess the classic - even the 'founding' text of orature-anthropology
        for Japan, and really highly regarded - _T~ono monogatari_ (Legends
        of T~ono) by Kunio Yanagita. Very nice edition sponsored by the Japan
        Foundation in 1994. This work has some of the problems of late Meiji/
        Taisho writing (nationalist assertions creeping in odd ways) but I
        think a lot of the recorded lore here is interesting and useful.
      • James Eckman
        ... Hmmm, I never think there s a glut of good books on a given subject, just mediocre ones. Hopefully I ve helped a couple of people by telling them books to
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29, 2005
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          >From: "sean_somers2002" <sean_somers2002@...>
          >
          >
          >There's a glut of books on Japanese 'mythology' (read: quasi-
          >ethnographic folkloric-y static culture compilation) on the market
          >right now.
          >
          Hmmm, I never think there's a glut of good books on a given subject,
          just mediocre ones. Hopefully I've helped a couple of people by telling
          them books to avoid unless they were looking for random art snippets on
          a remainders table.

          >I see that Tuttle is reprinting most of Lafcadio Hearn's
          >(Koizumi Yakumo) books. There's some books on Japanese folklore . . .
          >written by Japanese people - maybe something in trying on of those. I
          >guess the classic - even the 'founding' text of orature-anthropology
          >for Japan, and really highly regarded - _T~ono monogatari_ (Legends
          >of T~ono) by Kunio Yanagita. Very nice edition sponsored by the Japan
          >Foundation in 1994. This work has some of the problems of late Meiji/
          >Taisho writing (nationalist assertions creeping in odd ways) but I
          >think a lot of the recorded lore here is interesting and useful.
          >
          >
          Any that you found that are really a knockout? I've read most of Hearn
          in the distant past.

          > From: "makiwara_no_yetsuko" <makiwara_no_yetsuko@...>
          >
          >
          >On the other hand, if I decide I'd rather not amputate a thumb with a
          >bamboo splitter, the Drachen Foundation sells precut bamboo for kite
          >building:
          >http://www.drachen.org/store.html
          >
          >
          It's not a real project unless some blood is shed ;) I can tell you from
          past experience that a sharpened $5 machete will easily split bamboo. I
          can also tell you that the types with runners are weeds, at least in
          Southern California, and require frequent hacking! You might be able to
          pick up some free bamboo locally, so it helps the budget a bit.

          The bamboo killer,
          Jim Eckman
        • sean_somers2002
          ... well, the aforementioned _T~ono monogatari_ (available in English translation) is very useful. I think, in Japan especially, it s much more difficult to
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2005
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            > Any that you found that are really a knockout? I've read most of Hearn

            well, the aforementioned _T~ono monogatari_ (available in English
            translation) is very useful. I think, in Japan especially, it's much
            more difficult to divide otogizoushi (fairy tales) from kaidan (ghost
            folklore) from shinwashu (mythology) from Buddhist sermons etc etc
            etc. There's a formulation of history that does away with the facts
            of time, and these literary genres leap across all over the place in
            service of that concept.

            The topic of Japanese folklore is huge and diverse in its nature,
            owing to such a complex pantheon of deities, religious systems,
            regional variations, and historical evolution. Obviously the best
            stuff is in Japanese, and there's still quite a bit of it in print . .
            . they even have a remarkably good periodical dedicated to it, 'Kai',
            which contains both scholarly articles as well as . . . what can you
            call it? . . . . Heian-Gothic fiction?? As well as an assortment of
            popular youkai manga.

            In English, I like _Japanese Tales_ ed.+tr. Royall Tyler, who is a
            competent translator of the nou drama. It's very readable, siding
            with accessibility over scholarly annotation, but none the less
            presents a nicely varied anthology and a bibliography that can get you
            started on Japanese sources. There's loads more . . . I think one
            decides what sort of area to going into from there: although I think
            they're all inter-related, for publishing purposes they tend to fall
            into either religious or folklore categories, so a certain degree of
            choosiness comes into play.


            But I just finished vol. one of _Akutagawa Ryuunosuke sakuhin
            ronshuusei_, which contains no less than six essays on Akutagawa's use
            of classical folklore and literature in his short stories . . . goes
            to show how much the old literary style/themes pervade the modern and
            post-modern etc. Even an anime primetimer like 'Inuyasha', this
            strange continuation with koten.
          • James Eckman
            ... Yes it s great! ... In English most stuff is cribbed from Shakespeare ;) Thanks, Jim Eckman
            Message 5 of 6 , May 1, 2005
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              sca-jml@yahoogroups.com wrote:

              > From: "sean_somers2002" <sean_somers2002@...>
              >
              >
              >>Any that you found that are really a knockout? I've read most of Hearn
              >>
              >>
              >In English, I like _Japanese Tales_ ed.+tr. Royall Tyler, who is a
              >competent translator of the nou drama.
              >
              Yes it's great!

              >But I just finished vol. one of _Akutagawa Ryuunosuke sakuhin
              >ronshuusei_, which contains no less than six essays on Akutagawa's use
              >of classical folklore and literature in his short stories . . . goes
              >to show how much the old literary style/themes pervade the modern and
              >post-modern etc. Even an anime primetimer like 'Inuyasha', this
              >strange continuation with koten.
              >
              >
              In English most stuff is cribbed from Shakespeare ;)

              Thanks,
              Jim Eckman
            • sean_somers2002
              ... Yeah, I thought it was really nicely done - varied, scholarly without being dry, a great single volume book. I also really enjoyed _Ghosts and the
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1, 2005
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                > >>
                > >In English, I like _Japanese Tales_ ed.+tr. Royall Tyler, who is a
                > >competent translator of the nou drama.
                > >
                > Yes it's great!


                Yeah, I thought it was really nicely done - varied, scholarly without
                being dry, a great single volume book. I also really enjoyed _Ghosts
                and the Japanese_ by Iwasaka Michiko and Barre Toelken. Now, this
                book is meant to be a 'sociological' kind of book . . . you know the
                type, someone's trying to combine their spooky, ocultic interests with
                something academic enough to get noticed on a CV, but it works in this
                case in providing an imaginative, but analytical, study on the
                subject. It's great because not only providing legends etc it details
                cultural *attitudes* (ie: ritual observations, superstitions, etc), so
                you get a sense of how the folklore plays out in daily life, and not
                in the ruthlessly idealised fashion of the 'Orient' that most
                westerners succumb to.
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