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Easy Heian Era Recipes?

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  • booknerd9
    May day will be soon upon us. Well, not really, but I m already thinking ahead to what I m going to make to eat that day (and I m hoping I can make enough to
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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      May day will be soon upon us. Well, not really, but I'm already thinking ahead to what
      I'm going to make to eat that day (and I'm hoping I can make enough to share)[1].
      However, I'm not sure what would be a nice period meal to make- and it has to be
      either something I can make in a microwave at the dorm or will keep for a day or two
      after making it at home and can be plopped in the fridge. And it shouldn't need to be
      refridgerated before eating- that is, if it gets warm in the bottom of a basket, it
      shouldn't spoil easily.
      I was thinking of making somen noodles[2] with soy sauce[3], seaweed and tofu (no
      meat, no spoilage issues- and tofu'll keep for a few hours), but I'm not sure how
      period that is. Granted, since it's not in a contest, their periodicy probably doesn't
      matter, but I'd like to at least give it a shot.

      Any suggestions?


      And yeah, I'll probably bring "jelly rats" from Ikea[4]... they're not period but asking
      people if they want a "gummy plague rat" is fun...and my friends seemed to like them



      [1]Worse come to worse, we're right next door to the school cafeteria...
      [2]Yes, you can really make any sort of noodle in the microwave, if you keep alert and
      nuke the noodles in intervals and small bundles, remembering to stir. As a college
      student, I am very happy this is possible (:
      [3] I hear modern soy sauce isn't anything like it was in the day- I recall seeing a
      recipe for "shoyu" that required soy paste, mirin, ginger, etc. but I can't remember
      where or what it was all about...
      [4] These things. Scroll down. http://ikea.com.sg/store_services/swedish_market.asp
    • Elaine Koogler
      ... Actually, as best as I can tell (from The History of Japanese Food , what you are planning is period. As to whether the soy sauce we purchase today is
      Message 2 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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        booknerd9 wrote:

        >
        > May day will be soon upon us. Well, not really, but I'm already
        > thinking ahead to what
        > I'm going to make to eat that day (and I'm hoping I can make enough to
        > share)[1].
        > However, I'm not sure what would be a nice period meal to make- and it
        > has to be
        > either something I can make in a microwave at the dorm or will keep
        > for a day or two
        > after making it at home and can be plopped in the fridge. And it
        > shouldn't need to be
        > refridgerated before eating- that is, if it gets warm in the bottom of
        > a basket, it
        > shouldn't spoil easily.
        > I was thinking of making somen noodles[2] with soy sauce[3], seaweed
        > and tofu (no
        > meat, no spoilage issues- and tofu'll keep for a few hours), but I'm
        > not sure how
        > period that is. Granted, since it's not in a contest, their periodicy
        > probably doesn't
        > matter, but I'd like to at least give it a shot.
        >
        > Any suggestions?
        >
        >
        > And yeah, I'll probably bring "jelly rats" from Ikea[4]... they're not
        > period but asking
        > people if they want a "gummy plague rat" is fun...and my friends
        > seemed to like them
        >
        >
        >
        > [1]Worse come to worse, we're right next door to the school cafeteria...
        > [2]Yes, you can really make any sort of noodle in the microwave, if
        > you keep alert and
        > nuke the noodles in intervals and small bundles, remembering to stir.
        > As a college
        > student, I am very happy this is possible (:
        > [3] I hear modern soy sauce isn't anything like it was in the day- I
        > recall seeing a
        > recipe for "shoyu" that required soy paste, mirin, ginger, etc. but I
        > can't remember
        > where or what it was all about...
        > [4] These things. Scroll down.
        > http://ikea.com.sg/store_services/swedish_market.asp
        >
        >
        Actually, as best as I can tell (from "The History of Japanese Food",
        what you are planning is period. As to whether the soy sauce we
        purchase today is the same as it was in period...few of our foodstuffs
        are. The descriptions I found in this book indicated that it was
        fermented much as the product is today, but was purer and probably
        tasted somewhat richer. I also understand that sauces made in the same
        manner as those in period can be purchased in Japan, but aren't
        available here in the US.

        Hope this helps!

        Kiri

        PS: Love the idea of the "plague rats"....
      • Ellen Davis
        Ooh! Considering that I just cooked a Heian-style banquet for our Hanami last Saturday, I ll share some thoughts: Heian banquets, at least, typically
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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          Ooh! Considering that I just cooked a Heian-style "banquet" for our Hanami
          last Saturday, I'll share some thoughts:

          Heian banquets, at least, typically consisted of foods that could be "held":
          all the food would be set out before the meal started, so you didn't want
          anything that would suffer from getting cold. It was only later that
          courses started being brought out immediately after cooking, and served
          piping hot. (Heian sake parties would occasionally have some fresh-cooked
          stuff, but that seems to have been as much performance art as anything else:
          "See this fish? Watch me cook it!" and so on.)

          A banquet typically consisted of four types of foods:
          - Kubotsuki (fermented or dressed foods)
          - Namamono (fresh foods)
          - Himono (dried foods)
          - Kashi (sweets)
          Plus, of course, the ever-present rice.

          I know you're not talking about doing a "banquet", but my intent is to show
          that the "picnic" approach is really not incompatible at all with the Heian
          approach to food as we know it.

          Here are some things that come to mind:
          - Rice: onigiri (rice balls with fillings/toppings) are always great, and
          keep well (wrap them in nori before eating)
          - Pickles of any kind: you can make these fresh by slicing veggies and
          dressing them with a little soy, vinegar, bonito, plum paste, etc. Not hard
          to do.
          - Vegetables (such as green beans) aemono-style, such as green beans with
          sesame dressing
          - Simmered or vinegared vegetables or fish (the fish would be hard to keep
          without refrigeration, though)
          - Cold grilled salmon or other fish, perhaps marinated first
          - Dried fish
          - Venison jerky
          - Fresh fruit
          - Chinese-style sweet "snacks", especially anything involving sesame/sesame
          oil. There was a food item called "tougashi" (Chinese cakes) in period that
          seems to be the equivalent of little sweet rice/wheat flour fritters fried
          in sesame oil, probably the only real "deep-fried" food they had until
          shoujin ryôri and nanban ryouri came in. (I made these and they were a BIG
          hit-- toss them with honey and they'd probably keep pretty nicely. I'll
          send you the recipe if you're interested!)
          - Soumen are a good idea. In period they had something called "muginawa"
          that seems to have been the predecessor to modern soumen. Ishige mentions
          that they would eat these either in hot miso soup, or dipped in a sauce with
          miso, vinegar, and black pepper-- the latter might be a really nice cold
          noodle dish.

          As for ingredients, Kiri-hime has mentioned the major problem: the
          ingredients they had in period were not exactly like the ones we have
          available now. When I planned the menu on Saturday, I made certain
          assumptions that may have been completely wrong, but here they are, along
          with some known facts:
          - Tofu really came in more with temple cooking (shojin ryôri), and as I
          understand it wouldn't have been so widespread until late Heian at least.
          Same with yuba, fu, etc.
          - Instead of regular soy, I used tamari because it is made with soy alone
          and no wheat. This may have been incorrect, as I'm learning that they did
          use wheat, rice, etc. in their miso in period. What they had in the Heian
          period was called hishio and seems to have been halfway between miso and
          shoyu in consistency. Modern soy is almost post-SCA-period...
          - Instead of refined sugar, I used honey. Sugar, as I understand it, was
          something that wasn't really available until late in SCA period; instead for
          sweetener they used something called amazura, the sweet sap of a vine. I
          figured honey was an okay substitute (and it tasted really good.)

          Most of the background information I got from Ishige's "History and Culture
          of Japanese Food", which is a marvelous book if you can find it. If I think
          of anything else I will send it along, but I hope this gives you some
          suggestions!

          -Abe no Kotori


          > However, I'm not sure what would be a nice period meal to
          > make- and it has to be
          > either something I can make in a microwave at the dorm or
          > will keep for a day or two
          > after making it at home and can be plopped in the fridge. And
          > it shouldn't need to be
          > refridgerated before eating- that is, if it gets warm in the
          > bottom of a basket, it
          > shouldn't spoil easily.
          > I was thinking of making somen noodles[2] with soy sauce[3],
          > seaweed and tofu (no
          > meat, no spoilage issues- and tofu'll keep for a few hours),
          > but I'm not sure how
          > period that is. Granted, since it's not in a contest, their
          > periodicy probably doesn't
          > matter, but I'd like to at least give it a shot.
          >
          > Any suggestions?
          >
          >
          > And yeah, I'll probably bring "jelly rats" from Ikea[4]...
          > they're not period but asking
          > people if they want a "gummy plague rat" is fun...and my
          > friends seemed to like them
          >
          >
          >
          > [1]Worse come to worse, we're right next door to the school
          > cafeteria... [2]Yes, you can really make any sort of noodle
          > in the microwave, if you keep alert and
          > nuke the noodles in intervals and small bundles, remembering
          > to stir. As a college
          > student, I am very happy this is possible (:
          > [3] I hear modern soy sauce isn't anything like it was in the
          > day- I recall seeing a
          > recipe for "shoyu" that required soy paste, mirin, ginger,
          > etc. but I can't remember
          > where or what it was all about...
          > [4] These things. Scroll down.
          > http://ikea.com.sg/store_services/swedish_market.asp
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • booknerd9
          ... Well, I ll either be cooking two days before the event or the evening before in my dorm s kitchenette. But some of these recipies look like I could do-
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Ellen Davis" <ellen.m.davis@a...> wrote:

            Well, I'll either be cooking two days before the event or the evening before in my
            dorm's kitchenette. But some of these recipies look like I could do- especially
            anything that involves just raw veggies. Pickles with a soy, vinegar etc. would work
            quite well, though I'd have to go to the local co-op or Asian grocery to get some
            supplies to bring with me (and then bring it home, mom'll use it).

            > - Pickles of any kind: you can make these fresh by slicing veggies and
            > dressing them with a little soy, vinegar, bonito, plum paste, etc. Not hard
            > to do.
            > - Vegetables (such as green beans) aemono-style, such as green beans with
            > sesame dressing
            ...
            > - Fresh fruit
            > - Chinese-style sweet "snacks", especially anything involving sesame/sesame
            > oil.
            > - Soumen are a good idea. In period they had something called "muginawa"
            > that seems to have been the predecessor to modern soumen. Ishige mentions
            > that they would eat these either in hot miso soup, or dipped in a sauce with
            > miso, vinegar, and black pepper-- the latter might be a really nice cold
            > noodle dish.

            Miso, vinegar and black pepper, I can do that (:
            Hmn, I don't know if I can make the sweet snacks, though please, send the recipe, I
            can try making them at home just for fun. If they'll keep for a few days, I'll make them
            at home and just stash them in the fridge. Heh, I'll break period and provide sweets in
            the case of the gummy rats or yeah, yeah, Pocky....


            > - Tofu really came in more with temple cooking (shojin ryri), and as I
            > understand it wouldn't have been so widespread until late Heian at least.
            > Same with yuba, fu, etc.

            Ok. Yeah, the only reason I was going to throw in tofu is because I'm a vegetarian, so
            I like to throw in a little tofu in almost anything I eat.


            > - Instead of regular soy, I used tamari because it is made with soy alone
            > and no wheat. This may have been incorrect, as I'm learning that they did
            > use wheat, rice, etc. in their miso in period. What they had in the Heian
            > period was called hishio and seems to have been halfway between miso and
            > shoyu in consistency. Modern soy is almost post-SCA-period...

            Is it possible to buy tamari in the US? And do you have any advice for working with
            miso? I've seen big plastic bags of it at the local Asian grocery but can't figure out
            what the heck one would do with it... just spoon it onto the noodles?

            > -Abe no Kotori

            Domo Arigato
            -Noriko
          • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
            ... BTW, for those not on Tousando, here are pictures from the Hanami Party: http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/HanamiParty/index.php?var=rep1 (click on next
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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              On 4/20/05, Ellen Davis <ellen.m.davis@...> wrote:
              > Ooh! Considering that I just cooked a Heian-style "banquet" for our Hanami
              > last Saturday, I'll share some thoughts:

              BTW, for those not on Tousando, here are pictures from the Hanami Party:

              http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/HanamiParty/index.php?var=rep1

              (click on 'next' to see the pages with people and the banquet--not
              much yet, but some)

              -Ii
            • Solveig
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! There is not much in the way of cookbooks for the Heian period. However, there is interesting data about food from the
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig! There is not much in the way of cookbooks for
                the Heian period. However, there is interesting data about food from
                the Nara and Heian periods. For a while, the Japanese court was
                eating Chinese food. There was also a period during which the
                imperial court maintained several dairies. A number of years ago, a
                book came out in Japan which attempted to recreate the food from the
                Manyoushuu. Other interesting documents include: food appearing in
                the Engishiki, food appearing in various household records, food
                appearing in the Ishinpou. As I recall, Sei Shonagon included a few
                notes about food in her diary. Finally, there are several studies of
                food and food culture available in Japanese which include
                archaelogical data. In short, just how energetic do you feel?
                --

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar

                +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
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              • Solveig
                Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... You can do lots of yummy things with miso. Yes, you can use it as a condiment on sliced vegetables. However, you can
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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                  Noble Cousin!

                  Greetings from Solveig!
                  >Is it possible to buy tamari in the US? And do you have any advice
                  >for working with
                  >miso? I've seen big plastic bags of it at the local Asian grocery
                  >but can't figure out
                  >what the heck one would do with it... just spoon it onto the noodles?
                  You can do lots of yummy things with miso. Yes, you can use it as a
                  condiment on sliced vegetables. However, you can also use it as a
                  protien source in soup and you can even pickle stuff in miso.
                  --

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar

                  +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                  | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                  | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                  | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
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                • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
                  ... If you have any Asian food marts--go ahead and get some Japanese snacks, like the tea candies. I have currently forgotten the name of the really good
                  Message 8 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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                    On 4/20/05, booknerd9 <Booknerd9@...> wrote:

                    > Miso, vinegar and black pepper, I can do that (:
                    > Hmn, I don't know if I can make the sweet snacks, though please, send the
                    > recipe, I
                    > can try making them at home just for fun. If they'll keep for a few days,
                    > I'll make them
                    > at home and just stash them in the fridge. Heh, I'll break period and
                    > provide sweets in
                    > the case of the gummy rats or yeah, yeah, Pocky....

                    If you have any Asian food marts--go ahead and get some Japanese
                    snacks, like the tea candies. I have currently forgotten the name of
                    the really good jellies that are made in tea or sweet bean paste
                    flavors, but they are worth it. Not sure that they are period,
                    although I think they may be.

                    > Ok. Yeah, the only reason I was going to throw in tofu is because I'm a
                    > vegetarian, so
                    > I like to throw in a little tofu in almost anything I eat.

                    Plenty of things you can do with lotus root, pickles, bamboo, etc.

                    > Is it possible to buy tamari in the US? And do you have any advice for
                    > working with
                    > miso? I've seen big plastic bags of it at the local Asian grocery but can't
                    > figure out
                    > what the heck one would do with it... just spoon it onto the noodles?

                    Tamari you can buy--even in many 'American' (ie non-International) food stores.

                    With miso, you have to be careful sometimes. If you are going to do a
                    miso soup, don't boil the miso. It should be added in after you have
                    boiled everything and then just dissolved, or else kept warm at a
                    really low temp. Miso 'burns' easily, so be careful. Otherwise,
                    there are other things you can do with it, and I'll let Kotori-hime
                    describe them more fully.

                    -Ii
                  • makiwara_no_yetsuko
                    ... not period but asking ... seemed to like them [Apalling. Eating rats. These kids today!] M.
                    Message 9 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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                      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "booknerd9" <Booknerd9@y...> wrote:

                      > And yeah, I'll probably bring "jelly rats" from Ikea[4]... they're
                      not period but asking
                      > people if they want a "gummy plague rat" is fun...and my friends
                      seemed to like them

                      [Apalling. Eating rats. These kids today!]

                      M.
                    • makiwara_no_yetsuko
                      ... Sooooooooooo sorry I couldn t make it out for this. Looks like a lovely way to spend a spring afternoon. All this talk of food is making me hungry.
                      Message 10 of 25 , Apr 20, 2005
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                        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)"
                        <tatsushu@g...> wrote:
                        > BTW, for those not on Tousando, here are pictures from the Hanami Party:
                        >
                        > http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/HanamiParty/index.php?var=rep1
                        >
                        > (click on 'next' to see the pages with people and the banquet--not
                        > much yet, but some)

                        Sooooooooooo sorry I couldn't make it out for this. Looks like a
                        lovely way to spend a spring afternoon.

                        All this talk of food is making me hungry.

                        Makiwara
                      • Elaine Koogler
                        ... Cool pictures! Thanks for sending them. Sorry we had to miss the party, but I was oh, so sick all weekend, so it s best we hadn t planned on coming. Kiri
                        Message 11 of 25 , Apr 21, 2005
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                          Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.) wrote:

                          > On 4/20/05, Ellen Davis <ellen.m.davis@...> wrote:
                          > > Ooh! Considering that I just cooked a Heian-style "banquet" for our
                          > Hanami
                          > > last Saturday, I'll share some thoughts:
                          >
                          > BTW, for those not on Tousando, here are pictures from the Hanami Party:
                          >
                          > http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/HanamiParty/index.php?var=rep1
                          > <http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/%7Elogan/HanamiParty/index.php?var=rep1>
                          >
                          > (click on 'next' to see the pages with people and the banquet--not
                          > much yet, but some)
                          >
                          > -Ii

                          Cool pictures! Thanks for sending them. Sorry we had to miss the
                          party, but I was oh, so sick all weekend, so it's best we hadn't planned
                          on coming.

                          Kiri
                        • booknerd9
                          ... In short, just how energetic do you feel? ... Eneergetic in terms of doing research? Or for doing a lot of cooking? At this point, not really, since I have
                          Message 12 of 25 , Apr 21, 2005
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                            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig <nostrand@a...> wrote:
                            > Noble Cousin!
                            >
                            In short, just how energetic do you feel?
                            > --
                            >

                            Eneergetic in terms of doing research? Or for doing a lot of cooking? At this point, not
                            really, since I have only a few days of school left so, as much as I'd love to, I can't troll
                            through the library and I won't have access to any article databases while at home.
                            Unfortuantely.

                            But I think I have an idea of what I'm going to make:
                            -"pickled" carrots with vinegar and soy sauce/temari. Bonito was recommended but I
                            don't know much about it aside from the fact that it's dried fish flakes or if I'd like it.
                            -green beans aemono with the recommended seseme dressing (I've found sesame
                            dressing recipes online but I'll either pick one or let the forum decide, lol)
                            -somen with seaweed (or a sauce, not sure)
                            -some sort of fruit and/or gummy rats
                            Hopefully, all this can be prepared either a few days in advance or in a dorm room
                            kitchenette/microwave (:

                            Thanks everyone for the input so far!

                            -Noriko
                          • Solveig
                            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... mizu youkan ... It s even sold in supermarkets. ... Yes. This was a big point that our cooking teacher made every
                            Message 13 of 25 , Apr 21, 2005
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                              Noble Cousin!

                              Greetings from Solveig!
                              >If you have any Asian food marts--go ahead and get some Japanese
                              >snacks, like the tea candies. I have currently forgotten the name of
                              >the really good jellies that are made in tea or sweet bean paste
                              >flavors, but they are worth it. Not sure that they are period,
                              >although I think they may be.

                              mizu youkan

                              >Tamari you can buy--even in many 'American' (ie non-International)
                              >food stores.

                              It's even sold in supermarkets.

                              >With miso, you have to be careful sometimes. If you are going to do a
                              >miso soup, don't boil the miso. It should be added in after you have
                              >boiled everything and then just dissolved, or else kept warm at a
                              >really low temp. Miso 'burns' easily, so be careful. Otherwise,
                              >there are other things you can do with it, and I'll let Kotori-hime
                              >describe them more fully.

                              Yes. This was a big point that our cooking teacher made every month.
                              You boil everything else before you put in the miso, but after the
                              miso go in , you do not bring your soup to a boil.

                              Incidentally, we did make sort of purported to be Heian style okashi
                              one month. I think that it was probably sometime around Hinamatsuri.
                              --

                              Your Humble Servant
                              Solveig Throndardottir
                              Amateur Scholar

                              +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                              | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                              | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                              | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
                              +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                              | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
                              | trash by my email filters. |
                              +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                            • Solveig
                              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig ... Bonito appears to be another case of traditional mistranslation. If I recall correctly, katuso are actually a kind of
                              Message 14 of 25 , Apr 21, 2005
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                                Noble Cousin!

                                Greetings from Solveig
                                > But I think I have an idea of what I'm going to make:
                                >-"pickled" carrots with vinegar and soy sauce/temari. Bonito was
                                >recommended but I don't know much about it aside from the fact that
                                >it's dried fish flakes or if I'd like it.

                                Bonito appears to be another case of traditional mistranslation. If I
                                recall correctly, katuso are actually a kind of skipjack. Regardless,
                                fresh katsuo is really really yummy. The flakes can be used to make
                                dashi and some people use them to garnish tofu.

                                >-green beans aemono with the recommended seseme dressing (I've found sesame
                                >dressing recipes online but I'll either pick one or let the forum decide, lol)

                                Ahh. I don't recall even seeing green beans in Japan. So I think that
                                you are being very Iron Chef.

                                >-somen with seaweed (or a sauce, not sure)

                                Is this for the Summer?

                                >-some sort of fruit and/or gummy rats

                                I Japan, desert like munchies are structurally separate from the
                                meal. For the most part, this includes fruit. As for the gummy rats,
                                mizu youkan probably tastes a lot better.
                                --

                                Your Humble Servant
                                Solveig Throndardottir
                                Amateur Scholar

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                                | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
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                              • booknerd9
                                ... Any recomendations as to a proper vegetable? ... Well, May Day, which is summer enough. ... Well, if I can find them. But you ve never had an Ikea gummy
                                Message 15 of 25 , Apr 22, 2005
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                                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig <nostrand@a...> wrote:
                                  > Noble Cousin!
                                  > >
                                  > >-green beans aemono with the recommended seseme dressing (I've found sesame
                                  > >dressing recipes online but I'll either pick one or let the forum decide, lol)
                                  >
                                  > Ahh. I don't recall even seeing green beans in Japan. So I think that
                                  > you are being very Iron Chef.

                                  Any recomendations as to a proper vegetable?

                                  >
                                  > >-somen with seaweed (or a sauce, not sure)
                                  >
                                  > Is this for the Summer?

                                  Well, May Day, which is summer enough.


                                  > >-some sort of fruit and/or gummy rats
                                  >
                                  > I Japan, desert like munchies are structurally separate from the
                                  > meal. For the most part, this includes fruit. As for the gummy rats,
                                  > mizu youkan probably tastes a lot better.
                                  > --

                                  Well, if I can find them. But you've never had an Ikea gummy rat, have you? They're
                                  delicious! Anyway, I should bring some fruit. Period or not, apples are pretty popular
                                  as event edibles among my group, they're easy to eat, etc.
                                • daviem01
                                  ... found sesame ... forum decide, lol) ... that ... I don t really recall how period green beans are, but soramame (fava beans or broad beans) are VERY
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Apr 22, 2005
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                                    > > >-green beans aemono with the recommended seseme dressing (I've
                                    found sesame
                                    > > >dressing recipes online but I'll either pick one or let the
                                    forum decide, lol)
                                    > >
                                    > > Ahh. I don't recall even seeing green beans in Japan. So I think
                                    that
                                    > > you are being very Iron Chef.
                                    >
                                    > Any recomendations as to a proper vegetable?

                                    I don't really recall how "period" green beans are, but soramame
                                    (fava beans or broad beans) are VERY period (have been grown in Japan
                                    since the 900's, or so I've read). Plus, they are in season right
                                    now! Although they can be eaten raw, you probably want to cook them
                                    as the raw ones can produce an allergic reaction in certain people,
                                    especially those of Mediterranean origin.

                                    If you can find fresh favas, remove them from the pod, boil them,
                                    shell them, and toss them with a sesame dressing (mix toasted and
                                    ground sesame seeds, soy, sake, and sugar to taste). The same
                                    dressing works for all kinds of veggies including regular green beans
                                    and boiled chrysanthemum greens.

                                    You can also roast favas in the pod over an open flame, then pop them
                                    open and dust them with salt. This is more of a sake-drinking snack,
                                    but it might be fun if there will be any campfires at the site.

                                    (Interestingly enough, I've heard that favas were virtually the
                                    only "bean" available in Europe before the discovery of America. How
                                    true this is, I dunno.)

                                    -Abe no Kotori
                                  • Anthony J. Bryant
                                    ... Funny you should ask... it s good timing. I m now reading a book called Heian-cho no fashon bunka ( The Fashion culture of the Heian Court ) by Toriimoto
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Apr 23, 2005
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                                      booknerd9 wrote:

                                      > I was thinking of making somen noodles[2] with soy sauce[3], seaweed and tofu (no
                                      > meat, no spoilage issues- and tofu'll keep for a few hours), but I'm not sure how
                                      > period that is. Granted, since it's not in a contest, their periodicy probably doesn't
                                      > matter, but I'd like to at least give it a shot.
                                      >
                                      > Any suggestions?

                                      Funny you should ask... it's good timing.

                                      I'm now reading a book called "Heian-cho no fashon bunka" ("The Fashion culture
                                      of the Heian Court") by Toriimoto Yukiyo, and she has a chapter (or a chunk of
                                      one, so far) that talks about Heian dietary stuff.

                                      I'm giving the kanji of the terms in case anyone wants to do a Google search on
                                      them and dig for more information. There's some interesting stuff out there.
                                      Anyway, on with the meat of the chapter:

                                      She starts out pointing out there are three ways to prepare rice; steaming (musu
                                      -- 蒸す), boiling (niru -- 煮る), and broiling/parching (iru -- 煎る).

                                      STEAMED:
                                      Kowaii (強飯 -- a modern pronunciation often seen for this is "gouhan"; another
                                      is "kowameshi") was rice steamed in a pottery steamer called a koshiki (甑), and
                                      is the root of the modern word "okowa" (おこわ) which refers to sekihan (赤飯).

                                      Meals were taken twice a day: at the Hour of the Serpent (c. 10 AM) and the
                                      Hour of the Monkey (c. 4 PM). Kowaii was a major part of both meals. Toriimoto
                                      says that observance of these times for eating was strictly adhered to.

                                      Kowaii was sometimes taken in hand and made into solid balls called tonjiki (屯
                                      食), which is a direct analogue of the modern onigiri (おにぎり・お握り). They
                                      were eaten at a variety of times (the words Toriimoto uses is actually "variety
                                      of ceremonies/rites"). For example, in the Kiritsubo chapter of The Tale of
                                      Genji at Genji's coming-of-age ceremony, he is presented with many "rice
                                      dumplings" (to use Royall Tyler's term -- the original Japanese text has
                                      "tonjiki"). (Check this page out: http://www2.sala.or.jp/~toki/heian-ton.html )

                                      BOILED:
                                      Today, rice that is boiled is called himeii (姫飯 -- see
                                      http://kyoto.cool.ne.jp/eva_genji/0530off-01-2-10.htm -- a close cousin of what
                                      we think of as okayu [お粥]). In the summer, it was served in water or iced
                                      water and was called suihan (水飯); in the winter months, it was hot water and
                                      it was called yuuzuke (湯漬 -- if this makes you think of chazuke, you're on the
                                      right track). In Genji, the chapter Tokonatsu ("wild carnations" or "the pink")
                                      starts off with a reference to it in the first paragraph (in Tyler: "[they]
                                      called for iced water to make chilled rice" -- the original calls it "suihan").

                                      Suihan is, of course, soft. Mushy. It's almost rice soup. Heck, it *is* rice
                                      soup. It was particularly appealing, Toriimoto says, because it was soft and
                                      cool and that helped in the hot summer months when the appetite languished. It
                                      was also considered something that was good to fight off obesity. (Hmm. I think
                                      I'm going to have to try this. But think of the carbs, though...)

                                      In the Konjaku Monogatari, there's an account of a hot day in the 6th month (our
                                      late July or early August -- Pennsic, anyone?) when a fellow has a meal of dried
                                      melon (I have no idea what kind) and "sushi ayu" (鮨鮎 -- 'sweet
                                      smelt'/'freshwater trout' "pickled" in salt and/or sake) and some suihan.

                                      PARCHED:
                                      Parched rice is called kareii (餉); it's put in a "food bag" with salt and
                                      wakame (若布) seaweed (for carrying) as portable rations. All that is needed is
                                      the addition of some warm water to reconstitute it. (This is similar to "Uncle
                                      Ben's", in a way).

                                      As for veggies on the menu, Toriimoto says the list "begins with daikon (大根),
                                      melons (uri -- 瓜), eggplant (nasu -- 茄子), arrowhead (kuwai -- 慈姑 -- a
                                      leafy plant http://aoki2.si.gunma-u.ac.jp/BotanicalGarden/HTMLs/kuwai.html
                                      ),leeks (negi -- 葱), etc."

                                      Moreover, she says, "the meat of bird, beast, fish, and shellfish" was finely
                                      chopped and eaten raw (namashoku -- 生色).


                                      >>>>whew!<<<<

                                      Hope that's not too long.

                                      I've also got a couple of books here with some info on Heian and later munchies.
                                      I'll go through them and send that info later.

                                      Effingham
                                      --

                                      Anthony J. Bryant
                                      Website: http://www.sengokudaimyo.com

                                      Effingham's Heraldic Avatars (...and stuff):
                                      http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/avatarbiz.html

                                      Grand Cross, Order of the Laurel:
                                      http://www.cafepress.com/laurelorder
                                    • Elaine Koogler
                                      ... Tony, Anything you can dig out of the book about period food is great...please, if the rest of the list isn t interested, let me know...it ll help as we
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Apr 23, 2005
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                                        Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

                                        > booknerd9 wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > I was thinking of making somen noodles[2] with soy sauce[3], seaweed
                                        > and tofu (no
                                        > > meat, no spoilage issues- and tofu'll keep for a few hours), but I'm
                                        > not sure how
                                        > > period that is. Granted, since it's not in a contest, their
                                        > periodicy probably doesn't
                                        > > matter, but I'd like to at least give it a shot.
                                        > >
                                        > > Any suggestions?
                                        >
                                        > Funny you should ask... it's good timing.
                                        >
                                        > I'm now reading a book called "Heian-cho no fashon bunka" ("The
                                        > Fashion culture
                                        > of the Heian Court") by Toriimoto Yukiyo, and she has a chapter (or a
                                        > chunk of
                                        > one, so far) that talks about Heian dietary stuff.
                                        >
                                        > I'm giving the kanji of the terms in case anyone wants to do a Google
                                        > search on
                                        > them and dig for more information. There's some interesting stuff out
                                        > there.
                                        > Anyway, on with the meat of the chapter:
                                        >
                                        > She starts out pointing out there are three ways to prepare rice;
                                        > steaming (musu
                                        > -- 蒸す), boiling (niru -- 煮る), and broiling/parching (iru -- 煎る).
                                        >
                                        > STEAMED:
                                        > Kowaii (強飯 -- a modern pronunciation often seen for this is
                                        > "gouhan"; another
                                        > is "kowameshi") was rice steamed in a pottery steamer called a koshiki
                                        > (甑), and
                                        > is the root of the modern word "okowa" (おこわ) which refers to
                                        > sekihan (赤飯).
                                        >
                                        > Meals were taken twice a day: at the Hour of the Serpent (c. 10 AM)
                                        > and the
                                        > Hour of the Monkey (c. 4 PM). Kowaii was a major part of both meals.
                                        > Toriimoto
                                        > says that observance of these times for eating was strictly adhered to.
                                        >
                                        > Kowaii was sometimes taken in hand and made into solid balls called
                                        > tonjiki (屯
                                        > 食), which is a direct analogue of the modern onigiri (おにぎり・お握
                                        > り). They
                                        > were eaten at a variety of times (the words Toriimoto uses is actually
                                        > "variety
                                        > of ceremonies/rites"). For example, in the Kiritsubo chapter of The
                                        > Tale of
                                        > Genji at Genji's coming-of-age ceremony, he is presented with many "rice
                                        > dumplings" (to use Royall Tyler's term -- the original Japanese text has
                                        > "tonjiki"). (Check this page out:
                                        > http://www2.sala.or.jp/~toki/heian-ton.html
                                        > <http://www2.sala.or.jp/%7Etoki/heian-ton.html> )
                                        >
                                        > BOILED:
                                        > Today, rice that is boiled is called himeii (姫飯 -- see
                                        > http://kyoto.cool.ne.jp/eva_genji/0530off-01-2-10.htm -- a close
                                        > cousin of what
                                        > we think of as okayu [お粥]). In the summer, it was served in water or
                                        > iced
                                        > water and was called suihan (水飯); in the winter months, it was hot
                                        > water and
                                        > it was called yuuzuke (湯漬 -- if this makes you think of chazuke,
                                        > you're on the
                                        > right track). In Genji, the chapter Tokonatsu ("wild carnations" or
                                        > "the pink")
                                        > starts off with a reference to it in the first paragraph (in Tyler:
                                        > "[they]
                                        > called for iced water to make chilled rice" -- the original calls it
                                        > "suihan").
                                        >
                                        > Suihan is, of course, soft. Mushy. It's almost rice soup. Heck, it
                                        > *is* rice
                                        > soup. It was particularly appealing, Toriimoto says, because it was
                                        > soft and
                                        > cool and that helped in the hot summer months when the appetite
                                        > languished. It
                                        > was also considered something that was good to fight off obesity.
                                        > (Hmm. I think
                                        > I'm going to have to try this. But think of the carbs, though...)
                                        >
                                        > In the Konjaku Monogatari, there's an account of a hot day in the 6th
                                        > month (our
                                        > late July or early August -- Pennsic, anyone?) when a fellow has a
                                        > meal of dried
                                        > melon (I have no idea what kind) and "sushi ayu" (鮨鮎 -- 'sweet
                                        > smelt'/'freshwater trout' "pickled" in salt and/or sake) and some suihan.
                                        >
                                        > PARCHED:
                                        > Parched rice is called kareii (餉); it's put in a "food bag" with salt and
                                        > wakame (若布) seaweed (for carrying) as portable rations. All that is
                                        > needed is
                                        > the addition of some warm water to reconstitute it. (This is similar
                                        > to "Uncle
                                        > Ben's", in a way).
                                        >
                                        > As for veggies on the menu, Toriimoto says the list "begins with
                                        > daikon (大根),
                                        > melons (uri -- 瓜), eggplant (nasu -- 茄子), arrowhead (kuwai -- 慈姑 -- a
                                        > leafy plant http://aoki2.si.gunma-u.ac.jp/BotanicalGarden/HTMLs/kuwai.html
                                        > ),leeks (negi -- 葱), etc."
                                        >
                                        > Moreover, she says, "the meat of bird, beast, fish, and shellfish" was
                                        > finely
                                        > chopped and eaten raw (namashoku -- 生色).
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > >>>>whew!<<<<
                                        >
                                        > Hope that's not too long.
                                        >
                                        > I've also got a couple of books here with some info on Heian and later
                                        > munchies.
                                        > I'll go through them and send that info later.
                                        >
                                        > Effingham
                                        > --

                                        Tony,
                                        Anything you can dig out of the book about period food is
                                        great...please, if the rest of the list isn't interested, let me
                                        know...it'll help as we decipher the recipes from the Ryori Monogotari.

                                        Kiri
                                      • Dean Wayland
                                        Greetings Tony, ... Actually, I for one think this stuff is wonderful, and unless anyone else objects, I d like to hear more. As a non-Japanese speaker/reader,
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Apr 24, 2005
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                                          Greetings Tony,

                                          > Tony,
                                          > Anything you can dig out of the book about period food is
                                          > great...please, if the rest of the list isn't interested, let me
                                          > know...it'll help as we decipher the recipes from the Ryori
                                          > Monogotari.
                                          >
                                          > Kiri

                                          Actually, I for one think this stuff is wonderful, and unless anyone
                                          else objects, I'd like to hear more. As a non-Japanese speaker/reader, I
                                          am never going to access such a source, so write on...

                                          BTW Kiri-hime, how goes it with the translation?

                                          Yours

                                          Dean
                                          ***
                                          Dean Wayland
                                          Head Of The Fight School
                                          http://www.thefightschool.demon.co.uk
                                        • Elaine Koogler
                                          ... Ii-dono has finished the first 15 chapters of the book, first pass. He contends that the translation is rough and wants to work on it some more.
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Apr 24, 2005
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                                            Dean Wayland wrote:

                                            > Greetings Tony,
                                            >
                                            > > Tony,
                                            > > Anything you can dig out of the book about period food is
                                            > > great...please, if the rest of the list isn't interested, let me
                                            > > know...it'll help as we decipher the recipes from the Ryori
                                            > > Monogotari.
                                            > >
                                            > > Kiri
                                            >
                                            > Actually, I for one think this stuff is wonderful, and unless anyone
                                            > else objects, I'd like to hear more. As a non-Japanese speaker/reader, I
                                            > am never going to access such a source, so write on...
                                            >
                                            > BTW Kiri-hime, how goes it with the translation?
                                            >
                                            > Yours
                                            >
                                            > Dean
                                            > ***

                                            Ii-dono has finished the first 15 chapters of the book, first pass. He
                                            contends that the translation is rough and wants to work on it some
                                            more. Actually, I'm pretty impressed...but then that's fairly easy to
                                            do as I don't speak or write Japanese! We're also trying to work out
                                            the copyright issues. So it progresses...slowly, but continuing to move
                                            forward!

                                            Kiri
                                          • Dean Wayland
                                            Kiri-hime, ... I m really looking forward to this, keep us up to speed with your progress. Now to the kitchen... Yours Dean *** Dean Wayland Head Of The Fight
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Apr 24, 2005
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                                              Kiri-hime,

                                              > Ii-dono has finished the first 15 chapters of the book, first
                                              > pass.  He
                                              > contends that the translation is rough and wants to work on it some
                                              > more.  Actually, I'm pretty impressed...but then that's fairly easy
                                              > to
                                              > do as I don't speak or write Japanese!  We're also trying to work
                                              > out
                                              > the copyright issues.  So it progresses...slowly, but continuing to
                                              > move
                                              > forward!
                                              >
                                              > Kiri

                                              I'm really looking forward to this, keep us up to speed with your
                                              progress. Now to the kitchen...

                                              Yours

                                              Dean
                                              ***
                                              Dean Wayland
                                              Head Of The Fight School
                                              http://www.thefightschool.demon.co.uk
                                            • Anthony J. Bryant
                                              ... I ll go through some of the other books and see what I can dig out. There s some very useful bits, including a few recipes for some of the more simple
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Apr 25, 2005
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                                                Elaine Koogler wrote:

                                                > Anything you can dig out of the book about period food is
                                                > great...please, if the rest of the list isn't interested, let me
                                                > know...it'll help as we decipher the recipes from the Ryori Monogotari.

                                                I'll go through some of the other books and see what I can dig out. There's some
                                                very useful bits, including a few recipes for some of the more simple things --
                                                recipes aimed at folks who want to give a shot at early food for kicks. (Love
                                                folks like that! :) )

                                                One really interesting thing that I love is the concept of "so" (蘇) which is a
                                                type of cheese. It was rather popular in Heian Japan, but seems to have totally
                                                fallen off the menu by/during the Kamakura period. Essentially, it was what we
                                                now call "curd" -- only with no salt. If anyone knows any cheese makers, it
                                                would be nice to try this one.

                                                Effingham
                                                --

                                                Anthony J. Bryant
                                                Website: http://www.sengokudaimyo.com

                                                Effingham's Heraldic Avatars (...and stuff):
                                                http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/avatarbiz.html

                                                Grand Cross, Order of the Laurel:
                                                http://www.cafepress.com/laurelorder
                                              • Solveig
                                                Baron Edward! Greetings from Solveig! ... Do you really think that it is cheese? I had the impression that it was more like yogurt. It was definitely a
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Apr 26, 2005
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                                                  Baron Edward!

                                                  Greetings from Solveig!
                                                  >One really interesting thing that I love is the
                                                  >concept of "so" (ëh) which is a
                                                  >type of cheese.

                                                  Do you really think that it is cheese? I had the
                                                  impression that it was more like yogurt. It was
                                                  definitely a cultured milk product, but that
                                                  covers a LOT of territory.

                                                  >It was rather popular in Heian Japan, but seems to have totally
                                                  >fallen off the menu by/during the Kamakura period. Essentially, it was what we
                                                  >now call "curd" -- only with no salt. If anyone knows any cheese makers, it
                                                  >would be nice to try this one.

                                                  Just about every grocery in upstate New York
                                                  sells curd. However, even the cheesier
                                                  alternatives cover rather a LOT of territory. You
                                                  can also buy clotted cream around here.

                                                  It could also be a variant on kumis (although
                                                  that was made with Mare's milk). Kumis was fairly
                                                  local as well as any other Chinese alternative.
                                                  All of that aside. So was probably really an
                                                  Indian import and not a North China import. Then
                                                  again, does anyone know whether the T'ang were
                                                  into cheesey bits?
                                                  --

                                                  Your Humble Servant
                                                  Solveig Throndardottir
                                                  Amateur Scholar

                                                  +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                                                  | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                                                  | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                                                  | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
                                                  +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                                                  | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
                                                  | trash by my email filters. |
                                                  +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Anthony J. Bryant
                                                  ... All the photos of it I ve seen have been very solid, and it s clearly cuttable. It s described as soft and crumbling in the mouth. I tend to think of it
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                                                    Solveig wrote:

                                                    > Do you really think that it is cheese? I had the
                                                    > impression that it was more like yogurt. It was
                                                    > definitely a cultured milk product, but that
                                                    > covers a LOT of territory.

                                                    All the photos of it I've seen have been very solid, and it's clearly cuttable.
                                                    It's described as soft and crumbling in the mouth. I tend to think of it
                                                    texture-wise as like the really hard, stiff tofu.


                                                    > Just about every grocery in upstate New York
                                                    > sells curd.

                                                    The trouble is finding one without salt, though.

                                                    > However, even the cheesier
                                                    > alternatives cover rather a LOT of territory. You
                                                    > can also buy clotted cream around here.

                                                    I suddenly have an urging for strawberries. <G>


                                                    Tony

                                                    --

                                                    Anthony J. Bryant
                                                    Website: http://www.sengokudaimyo.com

                                                    Effingham's Heraldic Avatars (...and stuff):
                                                    http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/avatarbiz.html

                                                    Grand Cross, Order of the Laurel:
                                                    http://www.cafepress.com/laurelorder
                                                  • booknerd9
                                                    I hope no one minds but I m posting an update regarding my May Day cookery, so anyone else who needs a few quick recipes can make use of my trials (and
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , May 2, 2005
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                                                      I hope no one minds but I'm posting an update regarding my May Day cookery, so
                                                      anyone else who needs a few quick recipes can make use of my trials (and errors). I
                                                      made somen noodles with seaweed and a splash of tamari sauce and spinach with
                                                      toasted sesame seeds and a bit of the same sauce. I bought the tamari sauce at a co-
                                                      op, so I didn't need to make it or hunt around at every area Asian grocery.
                                                      Anyway, my provost liked the somen with seaweed, sort of. The problem with somen
                                                      is that it's a very sticky noodle and has an almost "wet dust" residue on it which
                                                      seems (so far) impossible to get off. I had a ton of the dish left over and a ton of
                                                      seaweed left in the fridge. Warning, if you get the stuff dried and are not planning on
                                                      feeing an army of penguins, you only need to make a fourth or so of what you need
                                                      as it swells up incredibly (i.e. a half a cup of dried seaweed turns into two cups or so
                                                      of the real stuff). So now I have seaweed hanging out in the fridge. I'd throw it out in
                                                      the main garbage on my dorm floor but it might wig out other residents....
                                                      Everyone loved the spinach with the tamari sauce and the toasted sesame seeds, in
                                                      fact I might make it for my parents when I get home. It's definately the easiest recipe
                                                      to make on the spot if all you have is a microwave, you just have to toast the seeds
                                                      earlier- and the browner they are, the better.
                                                      And the gummy rats went over splendidly as usual. I accidently made them a borough
                                                      tradition so now I'm beholden to the group to bring them to every event...

                                                      Thanks to everyone for helping me figure out what to make! (:

                                                      Noriko
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