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Folkwear Japanese Patterns

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  • John Hidalgo
    Hello Everyone, I went ahead and ordered Folkwear s Japanese Patterns (see http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama & Kataginu, #113
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 2, 2005
      Hello Everyone,

      I went ahead and ordered Folkwear's Japanese Patterns (see http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama & Kataginu, #113 Japanese Kimono and #129 Japanese Hapi and Haori). I was wondering if anyone else had used these patterns and had anything to share about them.

      Thanks for your help.

      Take care,
      John Hidalgo
      www.texasshinto.org
      www.roundrockbujinkan.com
      "Seek freedom and become a slave to your desires. Seek discipline and discover your liberty."




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • makiwara_no_yetsuko
      ... http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama & Kataginu, #113 Japanese Kimono and #129 Japanese Hapi and Haori). I was wondering if
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2005
        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "John Hidalgo" <oniyama@t...> wrote:
        > Hello Everyone,
        >
        > I went ahead and ordered Folkwear's Japanese Patterns (see
        http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama &
        Kataginu, #113 Japanese Kimono and #129 Japanese Hapi and Haori). I
        was wondering if anyone else had used these patterns and had
        anything to share about them.

        I have not used these, but I know someone who had someone make him
        clothing using them. Folkwear's Japanese patterns are based
        on "traditional" ethnic styles (read Edo period). While the basic
        pattern pieces go together the same way, the dimensions and shapes
        will be somewhat different than those used during the 16th century.
        Please refer to my earlier post from this weekend.

        Makiwara
      • Elaine Koogler
        ... Other than the fact that the garments really aren t period, they are fine. I haven t actually used #113, but do know that the design for both the hakama
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 3, 2005
          John Hidalgo wrote:

          > Hello Everyone,
          >
          > I went ahead and ordered Folkwear's Japanese Patterns (see
          > http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama &
          > Kataginu, #113 Japanese Kimono and #129 Japanese Hapi and Haori). I
          > was wondering if anyone else had used these patterns and had anything
          > to share about them.
          >
          > Thanks for your help.
          >
          > Take care,
          > John Hidalgo
          > www.texasshinto.org

          Other than the fact that the garments really aren't period, they are
          fine. I haven't actually used #113, but do know that the design for
          both the hakama and kataginu aren't period....the kataginu is a much
          later design...the panels are pleated into the front band, whereas in
          period, it was more like a kosode with no sleeves and without the sides
          sewn together. The hakama are a bit closer, but they have a stiffened,
          wider back waistband which didn't come into use until the 17th century.
          So far as the haori and hapi pattern is concerned, the haori is similar
          to the doboku...and if you use the pattern as a "jumping off point", it
          can be adapted to something more accurate. Take a look at the models at
          the Costume Museum site http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/) and
          you'll see what I mean...also Hiraizumi-sensei's site
          (http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/garb/garb.html).

          Kiri
        • Solveig
          Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! Aside from being comparatively modern, the folkwear patterns are for peasant clothing. For example, monpe are worn by
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 3, 2005
            Noble Cousins!

            Greetings from Solveig! Aside from being comparatively modern, the folkwear
            patterns are for peasant clothing. For example, monpe are worn by farmers in
            the fields and similar places. This is sort of like using a pattern for
            bib overalls to make clothing to wear to the signing of the declaration of
            independence.
            --

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

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          • Deborah K. Strub
            Greetings, As others have said, these patterns are for later periods than SCA. However, the #113 Kimono pattern is useful as a basic template as long as you
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 3, 2005
              Greetings,

              As others have said, these patterns are for later periods than SCA.
              However, the #113 Kimono pattern is useful as a basic template as long as
              you keep in mind the sleeve and collar differences for the various periods;
              the assembly of the component pieces is basically the same. The body panels
              are the modern standard 14" wide, but in period this could vary to as wide
              as 17". I usually recommend this pattern to those who HAVE to have a
              pattern and are just starting out in the SCA or with a Japanese persona
              because it is an adequate starting point. NOT perfect but adequate. If
              they're experienced sewers or have already done some homework then I show
              them how to draft their own. I started out using the Folkwear #113 around
              15-20 years ago because that was all I could find and didn't have the
              experience to make my own patterns. I now find it easier to just draft up
              my own but that's because I've been making the garments for a while and have
              done a bit of homework during the ensuing years.
              The hakama and kataginu are very modern as also mentioned before. Making a
              simple 4 or 6 panel period style hakama is much simpler than using the
              Folkwear pattern. If necessary you could probably get away with the hakama
              as long as you left out the large back support in the waistband. The
              kataginu is too obviously modern and I don't feel comfortable recommending
              it for SCA use.
              I've used the haori pattern to make my heraldic regalia and it worked quite
              nicely. It's modern but at the time that was the approved Japanese
              "equivalent" for the heraldic cloak and I didn't know any better. The thing
              is still in great shape despite years of abuse on the tourney field and in
              court.

              To sum up, I've used all of the Folkwear patterns you mention and I find
              many of them adequate for *starter* patterns while you do your research.
              You can then use them to build on or you can draft your own patterns
              depending on your sewing skill. I hope this is helpful.

              YIS,

              Murakami Tsuruko
              Baroness of Dragon's Laire
              Kingdom of An Tir

              -----Original Message-----
              From: John Hidalgo [mailto:oniyama@...]
              Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2005 7:45 PM
              To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [SCA-JML] Folkwear Japanese Patterns



              Hello Everyone,

              I went ahead and ordered Folkwear's Japanese Patterns (see
              http://folkwear-birchstreet.com/asian.html , #151 Japanese Hakama &
              Kataginu, #113 Japanese Kimono and #129 Japanese Hapi and Haori). I was
              wondering if anyone else had used these patterns and had anything to share
              about them.

              Thanks for your help.

              Take care,
              John Hidalgo
              www.texasshinto.org
              www.roundrockbujinkan.com
              "Seek freedom and become a slave to your desires. Seek discipline and
              discover your liberty."




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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            • Solveig
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Are you sure that it is a kosode pattern and not a yukata pattern? Kosode and yukata have somewhat different construction
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 4, 2005
                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig! Are you sure that it is a kosode pattern and not
                a yukata pattern? Kosode and yukata have somewhat different construction
                and are even folded differently.

                Wasn't Baron Edward working on a set of patterns?
                --

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar

                +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
                | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
                +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
                | trash by my email filters. |
                +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
              • Audrey Bergeron-Morin
                ... This is my main problem: how do I find the sleeve and collar differences for various periods? Some details are pretty hard to see on pictures! (Planning on
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 4, 2005
                  > As others have said, these patterns are for later periods than SCA.
                  > However, the #113 Kimono pattern is useful as a basic template as long as
                  > you keep in mind the sleeve and collar differences for the various
                  > periods;

                  This is my main problem: how do I find the sleeve and collar differences for
                  various periods? Some details are pretty hard to see on pictures! (Planning
                  on Heian, in case anyone has a great site to forward me to)
                • makiwara_no_yetsuko
                  ... SCA. ... as long as ... various ... differences for ... (Planning ... http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html has cutting diagrams for
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 5, 2005
                    --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Audrey Bergeron-Morin"
                    <audreybmorin3@h...> wrote:
                    > > As others have said, these patterns are for later periods than
                    SCA.
                    > > However, the #113 Kimono pattern is useful as a basic template
                    as long as
                    > > you keep in mind the sleeve and collar differences for the
                    various
                    > > periods;
                    >
                    > This is my main problem: how do I find the sleeve and collar
                    differences for
                    > various periods? Some details are pretty hard to see on pictures!
                    (Planning
                    > on Heian, in case anyone has a great site to forward me to)

                    http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html has
                    cutting diagrams for Heian.

                    Makiwara
                  • Audrey Bergeron-Morin
                    ... Thank you. Those cutting diagrams are for kosode. Can I use them for uchigi as well?
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 10, 2005
                      > > This is my main problem: how do I find the sleeve and collar
                      > differences for
                      > > various periods? Some details are pretty hard to see on pictures!
                      > (Planning
                      > > on Heian, in case anyone has a great site to forward me to)
                      >
                      > http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html has
                      > cutting diagrams for Heian.
                      >
                      > Makiwara

                      Thank you.

                      Those cutting diagrams are for kosode. Can I use them for uchigi as well?
                    • makiwara_no_yetsuko
                      ... as well? Yep. The kosode has a closed front sleeve - like on modern kimono, but with a bit more curve at the bottom. (BTW, for wear under hakama or
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 10, 2005
                        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Audrey Bergeron-Morin"
                        <audreybmorin3@h...> wrote:
                        > Those cutting diagrams are for kosode. Can I use them for uchigi
                        as well?

                        Yep. The kosode has a closed front sleeve - like on modern kimono,
                        but with a bit more curve at the bottom. (BTW, for wear under hakama
                        or nabagakama, you may be more comfortable making your kosode no
                        more than knee length.) For Heian, hitoe (the unlined underlayers)
                        and uchigi, the sleeve edges are left open so you can show off your
                        elegant taste in combining the layers beneath. Other than that, the
                        pieces of these garments get put together pretty much the same way.

                        Hope this helps.

                        Makiwara
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