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Re: [SCA-JML] Female Names

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  • Solveig
    Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Possibly. There really is not a definite yes or no about this. It depends upon your specific status and when you are
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 24, 2004
      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings from Solveig!

      >I am Takamatsu no Daijiro Muneaki
      >
      >Would my Lady be Takamatsu Kiku?

      Possibly. There really is not a definite yes or no about this. It depends
      upon your specific status and when you are from.
      --

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

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    • Solveig
      Ii Dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... Jeffery Mass claims that during the early Kamakura, women did not use family names. They used uji names instead. Thus,
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 24, 2004
        Ii Dono!

        Greetings from Solveig!

        >I believe that in the Heian era it would often depend on who had the
        >higher social rank, so that if a man married up that family might adopt
        >him in the process, thus making him a member of their larger family unit
        >(which often had implications in the court and the positions available to
        >him).

        Jeffery Mass claims that during the early Kamakura, women did not use
        family names. They used uji names instead. Thus, Tanaka no Tarou Munemasa
        might be married to Minamoto no Hanako.

        >In the later periods, among the buke (warrior/samurai families) it seems
        >that women often became a part of the man's household, and thus would
        >become 'of' that household.

        This needs a bit more explanation. Basically, "families" were coresidential
        groups. Thus, the husband of a matrilocal marriage would inherit the wife's
        name. Further, Jeffrey Mass also points out that during the early Kamakura,
        women will still inheriting estates and family headship somtimes in preference
        to their brothers.

        >It is not nearly as cut and dried as European marriages, it seems, since
        >Christianity--especially the Catholicism of Europe--seems to have
        >ritualized a lot of this fairly early on (I'm unsure how much of the
        >ritual was based on precedent).

        As I recall, it took a rather long time for the church to gain control over
        marriage with their first success with the elite. Essentially, the church
        gained control over inheritance.

        Matrilocal marriage was still fairly common in the late Muromachi period
        as witnessed by several Muko Kyougen plays.
        --

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

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        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
        +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to the |
        | trash by my email filters. |
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