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Re: [SCA-JML] book on armour

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... I wanted to wait to respond to this until I could get and see the book. The photos are *very* nice, although it s obvious that many of the armours are
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 4, 2000
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      torashi@... wrote:

      > Greetings all,
      >
      > This is a book I picked up resently and thought any one intrested in armour
      > should see. It's a 96 page book of color photos of Samurai from movies
      > being fillmed, festivals and such...
      >
      > The Samurai recreated in color Photographs (europa militaria special No4)
      >

      I wanted to wait to respond to this until I could get and see the book.

      The photos are *very* nice, although it's obvious that many of the armours are
      actually cheap matsuri/parade armours (with painted paper or leather bands
      sewn to arms and legs to imitate kote and suneate.

      It's also riddled with mistakes. The most egregious three, for example, is the
      3-5th century tanko armour identified as "This Heian Warrior" (in the first
      chapter; that's about 5 centuries off!); the constant misspelling of suji
      (ribbed) kabuto as tsuji (crossroads) kabuto; and the comment that in Meiji
      japan, all but three castles were torn down (massively wrong) and the varied
      translations of "seii taishogun" as "Special General" and "General for
      subduing the northern barbarians" (neither translation is correct: it is
      "barbarian subduing generalissimo", or "Great general for subduing
      barbarians"). There are quite a few other errors, but most of them are minor,
      even though alot of the terminology (e.g., calling a naginata a "pole-sword"
      (a meaningless term) instead of the more common and understandable "halberd."
      It is clear that neither of the authors had English as a primary language, and
      the editors were asleep at the wheel.

      As I said, the photos are excellent, though, and give some good looks at some
      armour styles not often seen in the West. I've been fantasizing about making a
      Nara-Heian transitional armour, and this gives a few decent photos of such
      armours.

      All in all, it's a good book, but use it only for armouring ideas, not for
      gospel.

      Effingham
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Baron Edward! I prefer to translate Seii taishougun as: Barbarian Surpressing Generalissimo . Surpressing seems to hold a bit more panache for me than
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 5, 2000
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        Baron Edward!

        I prefer to translate Seii taishougun as: "Barbarian Surpressing
        Generalissimo". Surpressing seems to hold a bit more panache for
        me than subduing. I agree that naginata really should be translated
        as halberd although I am sometimes fond of calling it a "sword on
        a stick" rather informally when describing the things.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
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      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... Ah, but of suppressing, or subduing, which is longer lasting? (Academic, really, since neither being suppressed or subdued is likely to be permanent .)
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 2000
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          Barbara Nostrand wrote:

          >
          > I prefer to translate Seii taishougun as: "Barbarian Surpressing
          > Generalissimo". Surpressing seems to hold a bit more panache for
          > me than subduing. I agree that naginata really should be translated
          > as halberd although I am sometimes fond of calling it a "sword on
          > a stick" rather informally when describing the things.

          Ah, but of suppressing, or subduing, which is longer lasting? (Academic,
          really, since neither being suppressed or subdued is likely to be permanent
          <G>.) I do think suppressing is less forceful than subduing, though. You
          can suppress an insurrection, but the insurrectionists are still there. If
          you subdue them, it's no longer an issue.


          As for sword on a stick; I like that. <G>

          Effingham
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