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Re: Hero - loved it!

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  • mattfmcti
    ... Cantonese. In Mandarin, ... Ziyi is ... mahn-yoo/ -- ... like the ... pronounced ... Yet another reason why IPA shold be used for EVERYTHING *j/k* But
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 3, 2004
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Bryant <ajbryant@b...> wrote:
      > Anthony Bryant wrote:
      >
      >
      > > Ah. That's 'cause she was born in Hong Kong, and it's in
      Cantonese. In Mandarin,
      > > her name's Zhang Manyu (no relation to Zhang Ziyi).
      >
      > BTW: in one of the pointlessly stupid ways Pinyin works, "Zhang
      Ziyi" is
      > pronounced /jong dzuh-ee/, and "Zhang Manyu" is pronounced /jong
      mahn-yoo/ --
      > there's little rhyme or reason. "Shi" is pronounced almost exactly
      like the
      > English "sure" (though farther back in the mouth) while "chi" is
      pronounced
      > /chee/ (though close to the top and front of the mouth).
      >
      >
      > Effingham

      Yet another reason why IPA shold be used for EVERYTHING *j/k* But
      seriously, a phonetically-based romanization system would seem so much
      more logical. I can deal with dropped vowels, like final -u in
      Japanese, but at least try to depict the way the vowels SOUND with its
      closest IE equivalent.

      Fujiwara
    • mattfmcti
      ... together. ... lots of great ... China (but at ... Huh. Shows how good I am at picking out detail ^_^ After looking closer at some net pics, it seems the
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 3, 2004
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        > Actually, it's a rather classic lamellar -- the scales are all laced
        together.
        > I've got a great book here called "The Qin Terracotta Army" with
        lots of great
        > close up photos. One of the reasons I've considered a temp job in
        China (but at
        > the cost of a whole year!) is to get to look at some early armour.

        Huh. Shows how good I am at picking out detail ^_^ After looking
        closer at some net pics, it seems the plates are punched with four
        holes on either side and two on the top and bottom, then laced
        overlapping down, correct? The section covering the shoulders and
        collar bones seems to be sort of tailored to the individual (the areas
        covered by kanagu mawari). Was this the case, or is there some pattern
        involved? Are you familiar with what I've seen called "mountain scale
        armour"? How does that date compared with the Qin lamellar?

        Back to Japanese: what were the period thicknesses of the plates used
        in the bowl of a kabuto? Were they tempered or hardened in some way to
        reduce weight while retaining the same level of protection? A lot has
        been made recently on the AA about the used of carbon steel and
        various hardening methods to improve authenticity and cut down on
        wieght, and I was wondering how this topic would be handled in a
        Japanese context.

        An eager and curious student humbly picking your brain,
        Fujiwara
      • Park McKellop
        Actually, I am of the opinion that using the medium carbon steels and hardening and tempering them, in the thicknesses/weights they are using is less accurate
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 3, 2004
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          Actually, I am of the opinion that using the medium carbon steels and hardening and tempering them, in the thicknesses/weights they are using is less accurate than mild steel, for the most part. The weights they are coming up with (only a couple pounds per leg harness) is less than most of what I am finding in my museum catalogs. I am sure there are exceptions, though.

          Some of Henry VIII's armors show incomplete, or failed attempts at the process. He imported some of the very finest Italian, and then, German armorers that he was able to afford. If the King of England wasn't able to get it right...

          Alcyoneus

          mattfmcti <mattfmcti@...> wrote:
          A lot has
          been made recently on the AA about the used of carbon steel and
          various hardening methods to improve authenticity and cut down on
          wieght, and I was wondering how this topic would be handled in a
          Japanese context.

          An eager and curious student humbly picking your brain,
          Fujiwara


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