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Re: Sizing and sneak previews

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  • James Eckman
    ... Stiffens and strengthens the paper. It also slows the absorption of ink. Chinese and Japanese painters paint on both, the effects obtained on sized paper
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 5, 2004
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      sca-jml@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >From: "makiwara_no_yetsuko" <makiwara_no_yetsuko@...>
      >Subject: Re: Sneak Previews
      >
      >
      >--- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@c...>
      >wrote:
      >
      >
      >>Another trick that people might try on the fans is to size the
      >>paper.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >OK, so what does sizing do, exactly, since you've brought it up?
      >
      >
      Stiffens and strengthens the paper. It also slows the absorption of ink.
      Chinese and Japanese painters paint on both, the effects obtained on
      sized paper are quite different from what you can do with unsized. This
      absorption is a relative thing of course, compared to Western water
      color paper, they both suck ink like a sponge! I use both, the unsized
      works really well with some subjects, it shows the ink gradiation very
      well while the sized paper usually can produce very nice color effects.

      >>Recipe from a fabulous book called "Japanese Bookbinding" by
      >>Ikegami. Available from many used book stores via abe.com, etc.
      >>and libraries. (Alameda County has it) This is a how-to book! It
      >>was published in 1986, so I suspect many of the American sources
      >>mentioned have changed names or moved.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >Arghh! No more projects, Jim, please! You're a bad, bad man! (I
      >seem to recall having seen a copy of it at Kinokuniya awhile back. I
      >resisted temptation at the time, but it looked really good.
      >
      >
      I got it from the library and 3 days later I ordered a copy. I want a
      more compact way of displaying my art and calligraphy. More portable too!

      Jim
    • Elizabeth Chase
      More projects? Bad man? Oh no, must pray to the kami for more Time..... Sizing? How does this work with paper? (Ok, get and read the book, yeppers.) In my
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 6, 2004
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        More projects? Bad man? Oh no, must pray to the kami for more Time.....


        Sizing?
        How does this work with paper? (Ok, get and read the book, yeppers.)

        In my world, being from the U.S. South, and of military experience..... 'sizing' meant starch. In the army, we weren't allowed
        to 'starch' our clothing, but we allowed to 'size' it. 'Starching' merely meant way more of the same than 'sizing', which was
        simply just enough starch to smooth out the wrinkles well.

        I'm probably headed for a trip to the library and bookstore, too!

        Rizii

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: James Eckman
        >
        >OK, so what does sizing do, exactly, since you've brought it up?
        >
        >
        Stiffens and strengthens the paper. It also slows the absorption of ink.
        Chinese and Japanese painters paint on both, the effects obtained on
        sized paper are quite different from what you can do with unsized. This
        absorption is a relative thing of course, compared to Western water
        color paper, they both suck ink like a sponge! I use both, the unsized
        works really well with some subjects, it shows the ink gradiation very
        well while the sized paper usually can produce very nice color effects.

        >>Recipe from a fabulous book called "Japanese Bookbinding" by
        >>Ikegami. Available from many used book stores via abe.com, etc.
        >>and libraries. (Alameda County has it) This is a how-to book! It
        >>was published in 1986, so I suspect many of the American sources
        >>mentioned have changed names or moved.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Arghh! No more projects, Jim, please! You're a bad, bad man! (I
        >seem to recall having seen a copy of it at Kinokuniya awhile back. I
        >resisted temptation at the time, but it looked really good.
        >
        >
        I got it from the library and 3 days later I ordered a copy. I want a
        more compact way of displaying my art and calligraphy. More portable too!

        Jim





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      • makiwara_no_yetsuko
        ... of ink. ... on ... Aha - that makes MUCH more sense. Sumi-e paper was among one of the papers tested in an early prototype and it was like working with a
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 6, 2004
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@c...>
          wrote:
          > Stiffens and strengthens the paper. It also slows the absorption
          of ink.
          > Chinese and Japanese painters paint on both, the effects obtained
          on
          > sized paper are quite different from what you can do with unsized.

          Aha - that makes MUCH more sense. Sumi-e paper was among one of the
          papers tested in an early prototype and it was like working with a
          paper towel!

          > I got it from the library and 3 days later I ordered a copy.
          Story of my life, Jim. ;->

          And you're still a bad, bad man, no matter what Rizii-hime says. SHE
          doesn't have two personae battling for dominance of her schedule and
          her checkbook....

          Makiwara
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