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Re: [SCA-JML] In praise of useful tools, was Straight lines

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  • Rae Lahman
    OK, $30 seems like a lot for a hunk of cardboard, but it s a USEFUL piece of cardboard. M. Good Heavens!! They ve gone up to $30????? Mine was only about half
    Message 1 of 22 , Sep 1, 2004
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      OK, $30 seems like a lot for a hunk of cardboard, but it's a
      USEFUL piece of cardboard.

      M.



      Good Heavens!! They've gone up to $30????? Mine was only about half that when I got it. I actually use it (and the little decorations) quite a lot. :) And I agree completely. It's a Very Useful piece of cardboard!!

      Tsukiko




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    • makiwara_no_yetsuko
      Kita-hime, Since you ve said you re a need-a-pattern sewer, I would love to know what you think. http://www.geocities.com/wodeford/KosodeMadeSimple.htm is
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 4, 2004
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        Kita-hime,

        Since you've said you're a "need-a-pattern" sewer, I would love to
        know what you think.

        http://www.geocities.com/wodeford/KosodeMadeSimple.htm is the link
        to the draft on Late Period Girl Clothes For The Sewing Impaired.
        Lots of pics, so be patient if it takes awhile to load.

        I've hit the point where I could use other eyes to look at it and
        would appreciate comments on everything from proof reading to
        workability of instructions and diagrams. If it doesn't make sense,
        I need to know before I make it known that this exists in a wider
        forum.

        Many thanks,
        Makiwara
      • makiwara_no_yetsuko
        ... Damn, my modem kicked off in the middle of that and it was SUPPOSED to go off-list. Pay no attention to the bad html-juggling going on behind that curtain.
        Message 3 of 22 , Sep 4, 2004
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "makiwara_no_yetsuko"
          <makiwara_no_yetsuko@y...> wrote:
          > Kita-hime,
          >
          > Since you've said you're a "need-a-pattern" sewer, I would love to
          > know what you think.

          Damn, my modem kicked off in the middle of that and it was SUPPOSED
          to go off-list. Pay no attention to the bad html-juggling going on
          behind that curtain. Unless of course, you WANT to proofread.

          Makiwara
        • Vincent A. Ferri
          The device that you speak of is called a sumitsubo and you can view and/or purchase them from these two links: Sumitsubo
          Message 4 of 22 , Sep 6, 2004
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            The device that you speak of is called a sumitsubo and you can view
            and/or purchase them from these two links: Sumitsubo
            <http://www.japanesetools.com/tools/layouttools/layouttools.php> and
            here Layout Tools <http://www.hidatool.com/woodpage/layout.html>

            Obayo,
            Binsu Jiro

            Matt Lewandowski wrote:

            > <snip>
            > >
            > ________________________________________________________________________
            > >
            > ________________________________________________________________________
            > >
            > > Message: 10
            > > Date: Mon, 30 Aug 2004 18:34:43 -0000
            > > From: "makiwara_no_yetsuko" <makiwara_no_yetsuko@...>
            > > Subject: Straight lines, was Re: Kosode project update
            > >
            > > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "tgrcat2001" <grasse@m...> wrote:
            > > > also straight-line impaired
            > >
            > > That's what rulers are for, ladies and gents! And seam gauges. ;->
            > >
            > > I was fabric shopping this weekend at a local merchant who offers
            > > sewing workshops in their remnant room. I watched half a dozen women
            > > earnestly using paper patterns to cut out rectangular pieces to make
            > > tote bags - a job I could've done in half the time by eye with a
            > > ruler and a piece of chalk. I do know that not everyone CAN do these
            > > things without step by step instructions. Once I have the kosode page
            > > up, I invite comments if things don't make sense to you. I'm even
            > > working out instructions on making your own paper patterns for the
            > > people that Must Have A Pattern.
            > >
            > > Our ancestors faced the same challenges. I just read that the Shoso-
            > > in temple artifacts include a miniature gizmo that works like one of
            > > those engineer's chalk line reels (only using ink instead) for
            > > marking fabric for cutting. If you plan on making your own clothing,
            > > particularly Japanese items which require a lot of straight lines,
            > > there are all sorts of tools you can find at your sewing supply store
            > > that are designed to make your life easier! It's worth your while to
            > > invest in a yardstick and even one of those cardboard cutting mats
            > > with gridlines printed on it.
            > >
            > > Cheers,
            > > Makiwara
            > >
            >
            > My information on Japanese woodworking simply calls it an ink line. It
            > does indeed work identically to chalk lines, though in my opinion seems
            > to produce a finer line, BUT that line is permanent once it is laid down
            > unlike a chalk line. I am contemplating making myself a set of 2-4 of
            > them... 1 for black ink (to use on light surfaces), 1 with orange ink
            > (to use on dark surfaces), possibly 1 for white ink (to use on metals),
            > and maybe even one to be filled with chalk. But alas I have way to many
            > projects to be getting to this one any time soon.
            >
            > Iwakawa Shiro Yoshimasa
            >
            > <snip>
            >
            >
            >
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          • Elaine Koogler
            ... I know I m not the person you sent this to, but I do have a question. I made this garment essentially the way you show it (the uchikake) for my
            Message 5 of 22 , Sep 7, 2004
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              makiwara_no_yetsuko wrote:

              > Kita-hime,
              >
              > Since you've said you're a "need-a-pattern" sewer, I would love to
              > know what you think.
              >
              > http://www.geocities.com/wodeford/KosodeMadeSimple.htm is the link
              > to the draft on Late Period Girl Clothes For The Sewing Impaired.
              > Lots of pics, so be patient if it takes awhile to load.
              >
              > I've hit the point where I could use other eyes to look at it and
              > would appreciate comments on everything from proof reading to
              > workability of instructions and diagrams. If it doesn't make sense,
              > I need to know before I make it known that this exists in a wider
              > forum.
              >
              > Many thanks,
              > Makiwara
              >
              I know I'm not the person you sent this to, but I do have a question. I
              made this garment essentially the way you show it (the uchikake) for my
              handfasting last year...with one minor exception. I looked closely at
              the line drawings provided on the Tokyo National Museum page and figured
              that the sleeve backs are sewn into the side seam of the body. I
              checked with a good friend of mine who is very knowledgeable, and she
              agreed with me. You, on the other hand, show the sleeves sewn to the
              body of the garment only at the top (which is how I used to do it), with
              the back of the sleeve pretty much left open. What do you think? I
              just looked at it again, and admittedly, it's kind of hard to tell.

              Otherwise, the page is great! what you have there, especially with the
              graphed pattern drawings, is excellent, IMHO!

              Kiri
            • makiwara_no_yetsuko
              ... It IS hard to tell, though from what I ve been reading both free and attached sleeves were used. Since swinging sleeves are slightly more involved in
              Message 6 of 22 , Sep 7, 2004
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                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1@c...> wrote:
                > I
                > just looked at it again, and admittedly, it's kind of hard to tell.

                It IS hard to tell, though from what I've been reading both free and
                attached sleeves were used. Since swinging sleeves are slightly more
                involved in finishing and construction, my sketches were for doing
                swinging sleeves.

                She who is bleary eyed this fine summer morning
              • James Eckman
                ... Also carried by Japan Woodworker in Alameda, CA. http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?dept_id=12268 I would like to point out based on personal
                Message 7 of 22 , Sep 7, 2004
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                  >"Vincent A. Ferri" <advocatevaf@...>
                  >
                  >The device that you speak of is called a sumitsubo
                  >
                  Also carried by Japan Woodworker in Alameda, CA.
                  http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?dept_id=12268

                  I would like to point out based on personal experience that sumi is
                  impossible to get out of cloth, especially silks, cottons and other
                  natural fibers. This is a good thing, otherwise all those historical
                  paintings on silk would flake away!

                  Jim
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