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Re: [SCA-JML] On Matters Martial and Civil

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  • mokurai
    Greetings, I am sure Ii or someone will chime in on this eventually, so have patience Fujiwara-dono. I personally suspect that the majority of the titles were
    Message 1 of 40 , Aug 3, 2004
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      Greetings,

      I am sure Ii or someone will chime in on this eventually, so have
      patience Fujiwara-dono. I personally suspect that the majority of the
      titles were utilized in Japan. Lao Tzu certainly was an influence as
      were the other Taoist philosophers. Sun Tzu made it also. Takeda Shingen
      is credited (perhaps apocryphally) with having used Sun Tzu in his
      battle tactics, having been exposed to them while a student at the
      monastery. Hence the famous Fu-Rin-Kai-Zan banner which alludes to Sun
      Tzu. The key question is, to what extent were the various classic texts
      studied and used and when.

      My general perception is that many Mainland philosophical works were
      more in vogue and held greater sway in Heiankyo, then fell out of favor
      as the court withered. But there are exceptions. Zen writings from China
      came to the fore when Zen began to settle in in the 12-13th centuries.
      Sun Tzu may not have gained real popularity until the War of Northern
      and Southern Courts, or even Sengoku -- when things got really, really
      nasty and anything that could give a Daimyo an edge was crucial (archery
      duels? Are you kidding???). Similarly, Confucian works and Taoist
      writings become most powerful in the Edo period when they were studied
      by samurai administrators and the new poets and painters respectively.
      These are all gross generalizations, however. I would say that if your
      persona was of a sufficient rank and education, it is likely you would
      have run into many, if not all of these works, regardless of period. But
      you might or might not consider them relevant to your life. It would be
      a toss-up between traditional "this is the way we have always done
      things" and "this is how the old masters did things".

      - mokurai



      mattfmcti wrote:

      >Katai na Itoko! (Honorable Cousins)
      >
      >I have been reading the Sawyer translation of various Chinese military
      >classics (entitled The Seven Military Classics of Ancient China), and
      >was wondering which of these were known to the Japanese in period:
      >
      >T'ai Kung's Six Secret Teachings
      >Ssu-ma Fa
      >Sun-tzu's Art of War
      >Wu-tzu
      >Wei Liao-tzu
      >Three Stratagies of Huang Shih-kung
      >Questions and Replies between T'ang T'ai-tsung and Li Wei-kung
      >
      >Or, alternatively, do the Japanese have some native literature on
      >civil and martial administration? Arigatou!
      >
      >-Fujiwara Takaharu
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      --
      Cord: "Talking to you is like talking to a wall!"

      Blind Man: "Buddha once sat before a wall, and when he arose, he was enlightened."

      Cord: "Do you compare yourself to Buddha?"

      Blind Man: "No, just the wall."

      - 'Circle of Iron'
    • mokurai
      Well, no offense, but, no kidding. That s the other reason I don t like to do it. I m actually a more of a gentleman than I may sound at times. - mokurai ...
      Message 40 of 40 , Aug 6, 2004
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        Well, no offense, but, no kidding. That's the other reason I don't like
        to do it. I'm actually a more of a gentleman than I may sound at times.

        - mokurai


        Solveig wrote:

        >Mokurai Bozu!
        >
        >Greetings from Solveig! The problem with you going to a sushi bar dressed
        >as a Buddhist monk is not one of race, but one of whether or not you are
        >a real Buddhist monk. There are pleanty of European types who have gone
        >off and obtained buddhist ordination and work hard at begging alms for
        >real to help real Japanese temples.
        >
        >

        --
        Cord: "Talking to you is like talking to a wall!"

        Blind Man: "Buddha once sat before a wall, and when he arose, he was enlightened."

        Cord: "Do you compare yourself to Buddha?"

        Blind Man: "No, just the wall."

        - 'Circle of Iron'
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