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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Yumi draw weight for a given draw length

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  • Dean Wayland
    Hi Folks, A couple of months ago, I posted a short series of questions concerning the draw weight of a yumi at a given length. A number of folks asked me on
    Message 1 of 40 , Jul 5, 2004
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      Hi Folks,

      A couple of months ago, I posted a short series of questions concerning
      the draw weight of a yumi at a given length. A number of folks asked me
      on and off group to keep them apprised of the results, so here they are:

      Firstly, I have learned a whole lot more about archery and kyudo in
      particular since then, and I realised that my question was flawed in a
      number of respects. However, this has all now been resolved.

      To satisfy the live role playing communities specifications for the
      power of a bow over here in the UK, that is "it should not exceed 30
      pounds of pull at a draw length of 28 inches", a yumi, wherein the
      specified draw weight is measured at 90cm, needs not to exceed a draw
      weight of 38 pounds.

      So, I have now purchased and tested my first yumi. It is a 17kg (37.4
      pound) "namisun" (designed for a draw length up to 90cm) and at 28" it
      delivers 29.5 pounds, which is just right for LRP combat. Plus, with the
      longer arrows used in historical re-enactment (33.5" draw length when
      fitted with a LRP warhead), we can get up to about 35 pounds of power,
      which is also fine.

      My justification for buying the shorter "namisum" model was because the
      draw that I am using is shorter than the one I would need to perform the
      modern kyudo draw of to well behind the ear, so that it is compatible
      with the wearing of armour, which if I have understood things correctly,
      render it much more like battlefield shooting. This means the bow is
      actually 6cm (2.375") shorter in length, but on reflection with a bow
      that is 7 feet 3 inches long, the difference was unimportant.

      I hope those of you out there facing a similar problem will find this
      data useful. With thanks to those of you who responded.

      Yours

      Dean

      (Dean Wayland)
      Head Of The Fight School
      http://www.thefightschool.demon.co.uk
    • Dean Wayland
      Hi Folks, A couple of months ago, I posted a short series of questions concerning the draw weight of a yumi at a given length. A number of folks asked me on
      Message 40 of 40 , Jul 5, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Folks,

        A couple of months ago, I posted a short series of questions concerning
        the draw weight of a yumi at a given length. A number of folks asked me
        on and off group to keep them apprised of the results, so here they are:

        Firstly, I have learned a whole lot more about archery and kyudo in
        particular since then, and I realised that my question was flawed in a
        number of respects. However, this has all now been resolved.

        To satisfy the live role playing communities specifications for the
        power of a bow over here in the UK, that is "it should not exceed 30
        pounds of pull at a draw length of 28 inches", a yumi, wherein the
        specified draw weight is measured at 90cm, needs not to exceed a draw
        weight of 38 pounds.

        So, I have now purchased and tested my first yumi. It is a 17kg (37.4
        pound) "namisun" (designed for a draw length up to 90cm) and at 28" it
        delivers 29.5 pounds, which is just right for LRP combat. Plus, with the
        longer arrows used in historical re-enactment (33.5" draw length when
        fitted with a LRP warhead), we can get up to about 35 pounds of power,
        which is also fine.

        My justification for buying the shorter "namisum" model was because the
        draw that I am using is shorter than the one I would need to perform the
        modern kyudo draw of to well behind the ear, so that it is compatible
        with the wearing of armour, which if I have understood things correctly,
        render it much more like battlefield shooting. This means the bow is
        actually 6cm (2.375") shorter in length, but on reflection with a bow
        that is 7 feet 3 inches long, the difference was unimportant.

        I hope those of you out there facing a similar problem will find this
        data useful. With thanks to those of you who responded.

        Yours

        Dean

        (Dean Wayland)
        Head Of The Fight School
        http://www.thefightschool.demon.co.uk
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