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Tansu

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  • Otagiri Tatsuzou
    Onegaishimasu! I am preparing to rid my encampment of plastic storage bins and cannot think of anything more appropriate than tansu to take their place even
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2004
      Onegaishimasu!

      I am preparing to rid my encampment of plastic storage bins and cannot
      think of anything more appropriate than tansu to take their place even
      though I know that the tansu we are familiar with are an Edo/Meiji
      form. I am planning on something like kaiden tansu - numerous small
      individual chests with doors or drawers - each one light weight and
      portable even when full - where are those hoards of chugen when you
      need them? I would appreciate input from the list on the early history
      of tansu, suggestions on how best to go about the project, or possible
      alternatives.

      Here are two ideas I am considering modifying for the basic unit:
      http://www.ikea-usa.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10101&storeId=12&productId=13590&langId=-1&parentCats=10115*10195

      (or this scaled larger and squared off)
      http://www.jeffgreefwoodworking.com/pnc/Boxes/Oriental/index.html

      Thanks for you input
      Otagiri
    • Elaine Koogler
      I used to sell tansu, and generally, they were rectangular boxes with drawers, usually two at the top,side by side and two the width of the chest below. IIRC,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 30, 2004
        I used to sell tansu, and generally, they were rectangular boxes with
        drawers, usually two at the top,side by side and two the width of the
        chest below. IIRC, the sides and back were dovetailed together rather
        than using a framework as is shown in the examples. In fact, if you
        didn't want to do the dovetailing, you could simply glue and nail the
        sides and backs together. Then you would need cross-pieces to support
        the drawers. On each end of the ones I had were iron handles that could
        be raised to use to carry the chest on a pole. The tops of the chests
        were flat,enabling one to stack them one on top of the other. They had
        simple inset iron pulls on the drawers.

        I don't know if this helps, but I hope so....

        Kiri

        Otagiri Tatsuzou wrote:

        > Onegaishimasu!
        >
        > I am preparing to rid my encampment of plastic storage bins and cannot
        > think of anything more appropriate than tansu to take their place even
        > though I know that the tansu we are familiar with are an Edo/Meiji
        > form. I am planning on something like kaiden tansu - numerous small
        > individual chests with doors or drawers - each one light weight and
        > portable even when full - where are those hoards of chugen when you
        > need them? I would appreciate input from the list on the early history
        > of tansu, suggestions on how best to go about the project, or possible
        > alternatives.
        >
        > Here are two ideas I am considering modifying for the basic unit:
        > http://www.ikea-usa.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10101&storeId=12&productId=13590&langId=-1&parentCats=10115*10195
        > <http://www.ikea-usa.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10101&storeId=12&productId=13590&langId=-1&parentCats=10115*10195>
        >
        > (or this scaled larger and squared off)
        > http://www.jeffgreefwoodworking.com/pnc/Boxes/Oriental/index.html
        >
        > Thanks for you input
        > Otagiri
        >
        >
        >
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      • makiwara_no_yetsuko
        ... cannot ... even ... One word: baskets. Makiwara
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Otagiri Tatsuzou" <ronbroberg@y...>
          wrote:
          > Onegaishimasu!
          >
          > I am preparing to rid my encampment of plastic storage bins and
          cannot
          > think of anything more appropriate than tansu to take their place
          even
          > though I know that the tansu we are familiar with are an Edo/Meiji
          > form.

          One word: baskets.

          Makiwara
        • Solveig
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Portable tansu made out of wood are to the best of my knowledge quite period. Baskets used in a variety of ways are
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig!

            >One word: baskets.

            Portable tansu made out of wood are to the best of my knowledge quite period.
            Baskets used in a variety of ways are also quite period. However, the one
            appearing in the first poem in the Manyoshu was probably a hand carried affair
            used for gathering. The main issue in box construction is the relative scarcity
            of iron nails in Japan. You should also expect a number of the fittings to be
            made from bronze. To the best of my knowledge, baskets were not used to store
            clothing. Today, clothing is often stored in cardboard boxes of dimensions
            similar to earlier wooden boxes. Iconographic evidences suggests hanging
            some clothing on clothing rods when not being worn.
            --

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
            | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
            | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
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          • Elaine Koogler
            If the clothing rods are the rack-type things I ve seen in paintings, the book on Japanese clothing by Helen Benton Minnich, Japanese Costume and the Makers
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
              If the clothing rods are the rack-type things I've seen in paintings,
              the book on Japanese clothing by Helen Benton Minnich, "Japanese Costume
              and the Makers of its Elegant Tradition," has some wonderful pictures of
              these.

              Kiri

              Solveig wrote:

              > Noble Cousin!
              >
              > Greetings from Solveig!
              >
              > >One word: baskets.
              >
              > Portable tansu made out of wood are to the best of my knowledge quite
              > period.
              > Baskets used in a variety of ways are also quite period. However, the one
              > appearing in the first poem in the Manyoshu was probably a hand
              > carried affair
              > used for gathering. The main issue in box construction is the relative
              > scarcity
              > of iron nails in Japan. You should also expect a number of the
              > fittings to be
              > made from bronze. To the best of my knowledge, baskets were not used
              > to store
              > clothing. Today, clothing is often stored in cardboard boxes of dimensions
              > similar to earlier wooden boxes. Iconographic evidences suggests hanging
              > some clothing on clothing rods when not being worn.
              > --
              >
              > Your Humble Servant
              > Solveig Throndardottir
              > Amateur Scholar
              >
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              > | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
              > | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
              > | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              > | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
              > | the trash by my email filters. |
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              >
              >
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              Learning is a lifetime journey...growing older merely adds experience to
              knowledge and wisdom to curiosity.
              -- C.E. Lawrence



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