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Re: [SCA-JML] Digest Number 1447

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  • Aden Steinke
    ... Almost correct -as well as being used when a blade was made, shirasaya or plain wood mountings were used to hold a blade not in use, while a wooden blade
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 3, 2004
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      >Re: Of daggers and swords.
      >From: Ii Saburou
      ><snip>
      >Shirasaya (if you are thinking of the plain wood mountings) are supposed
      >to be for swords that have not yet been mounted--it's a temporary mounting
      >until the other fittings are put on. If you mean the 'disguised' katana
      >that are supposed to look like bokuto or walking sticks, then I think
      >that is an Edo or later practice.

      Almost correct -as well as being used when a blade was made, shirasaya or plain wood mountings were used to hold a blade not in use, while a wooden blade (tsunagi ?) could be put in the fittings for display (don't just grab a sword off the wall and try to kill your host...).

      Aden


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    • Ii Saburou
      ... True--I was thinking of that as being not yet mounted since the fittings are removed, and haven t been put back on. Another interesting note on the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 3, 2004
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        On Thu, 3 Jun 2004, Aden Steinke wrote:

        > Almost correct -as well as being used when a blade was made, shirasaya
        > or plain wood mountings were used to hold a blade not in use, while a
        > wooden blade (tsunagi ?) could be put in the fittings for display (don't
        > just grab a sword off the wall and try to kill your host...).

        True--I was thinking of that as being 'not yet mounted' since the fittings
        are removed, and haven't been put back on.

        Another interesting note on the wooden or bamboo blades: Apparently, in
        the Edo period, samurai who were down on their luck would occassionally
        sell their swords. However, since they needed to maintain the appearance
        of wearing two swords, they would get a wooden or bamboo replacement
        (since it would rattle around inside the saya as though something were
        actually there). Just hope you never had to get into a fight....

        -Ii
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