Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-JML] Re: nunchaku/flails

Expand Messages
  • sigrune@aol.com
    Also just a side note on flail type weapons. If one were to make a flail weapon with a cord/pivot short enough to prevent entangling of wrist or neck the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Also just a side note on flail type weapons.

      If one were to make a flail weapon with a cord/pivot short enough to prevent entangling of wrist or neck the functionality of that weapon would be diminished greatly. Flails and chains were popular because, A. extra force generated by centrifigal motion, without use of additional force. B. Entangling effect and C. ability to bybass a defensive measure. D. Effective and inexpensive.

      A flail made sepecifically for combat had a head/chain long enough to allow the motion of the head to wrap down upon a head even if the shield was held to block, or to wrap-shot the back of the leg, or to go over the shield and crush the hand/arm behind it. It's ability to foul weapons and lims was a known benefit, if we take that away the other use of being able to "shoot around corners" so to speak also dissapears. A mace becomes far more useful.

      In early examples, or in weapons used by footmen, we see (european) a haft from a nunchuk on the end of a 4 foot long pole with a chain that is esentialy a pivot only. This was a grain flail, the same as the nunchuk, but with a longer handle. Bits of metal and spikes were added mainly to improve the grippiness of the head. It's role was intended to break the shins of the horses, or to unhorse a mounted warrior. granted it was effective at beating people to death but a common tactic was to use a couple of them (they are lying around anyhow) to bring a horse to a standstill, hinder or unhorse the rider, then the guy with the 3 foot long iron spike on a 2 foot haft (real easy for Eddy the blacksmith to whip up out of scrap) to use his weight to make a Knight-ka-bob. Very econmical way of dealing with knights after the initial charge. Also seem to remember the English soldiers were fairly fond of keeping a few handy in the ranks of the footsoldiers when on campaign in France, seems the French were a little paranoid of them for some reason. Maybe something to do with those who initialy survived the bow onlsought at Agincourt.

      -Mike
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.