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Honorifics

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  • Park McKellop
    ... You may choose to use their name, or, you may choose not to test your brand new sword on them at a common roadside. Either way, they should be pleased
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 2, 2004
      >Yeah, that's what I think too, but I'd like to have a useable honorific for non-armigers.

      >Masamune

      You may choose to use their name, or, you may choose not to test your brand new sword on them at a common roadside. Either way, they should be pleased with your attention, or lack thereof. ;-)

      Alcyoneus



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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Leonora Radovcic
      Hello to all on this list. I have a few questions. There are some honorifics that I am not sure what they mean. Or I thouht I knew what they meant. I m not
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 2, 2008
        Hello to all on this list. I have a few questions. There are some
        honorifics that I am not sure what they mean. Or I thouht I knew what
        they meant. I'm not 100% sure if the Japanese/English dictionaries out
        there vary from each other. I was trying to look up what the
        honorific -hime meant, as I've only seen it being used on this list; as
        well as -dono. I've always thought that -chan was used when referring
        to young women and small children. -san when referring to someone
        within the same age/class/rank. -sama when reffering to an elder of
        teacher. Correct me if anything I've wrote is wrong. So, the question
        is what and when does the honorific -hime and -dono used, and what it
        means. Thousand thanks.

        YIS
        Branimira
      • wodeford
        ... Go to http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/miscellany.html and click on Modes of address. Everything you need is there. Saionji no Hanae West Kingdom
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 2, 2008
          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Leonora Radovcic" <Lightpaws@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello to all on this list. I have a few questions. There are some
          > honorifics that I am not sure what they mean.

          Go to http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/miscellany.html and
          click on "Modes of address." Everything you need is there.

          Saionji no Hanae
          West Kingdom
        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! The principal difference is between modern Japanese (which isn t quite as cut and dried as you imply) and pre-modern
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 2, 2008
            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig! The principal difference is between modern
            Japanese (which isn't quite as cut and dried as you imply) and
            pre-modern Japanese. You will use honorifics like "dono" used
            a LOT in jidaigeki (period) movies. Incidentally, "tono" (dono) can
            also be used as a pronoun. This honorific is still used in Japan,
            but primarily in formal writing. For example, it's Houmu Daijin dono.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Leonora Radovcic
            Thank you Solveig. I guess that was just a lot of manga and historical, fictional, Japanese novels I ve read. But, if it s not so cut and dry, then dono and
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 2, 2008
              Thank you Solveig. I guess that was just a lot of manga and
              historical, fictional, Japanese novels I've read. But, if it's not
              so cut and dry, then dono and tono are the same, for equals? And can
              you give an example of an equal. Is that class or rank, or politics,
              or what? I read from a link someone sent that -hime is used among
              females who are equal.

              Sorry. I didn't realize there such depth into this. It's leaving me
              slightly confused. :(

              Branimira

              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Noble Cousin!
              >
              > Greetings from Solveig! The principal difference is between modern
              > Japanese (which isn't quite as cut and dried as you imply) and
              > pre-modern Japanese. You will use honorifics like "dono" used
              > a LOT in jidaigeki (period) movies. Incidentally, "tono" (dono) can
              > also be used as a pronoun. This honorific is still used in Japan,
              > but primarily in formal writing. For example, it's Houmu Daijin
              dono.
              >
              > Your Humble Servant
              > Solveig Throndardottir
              > Amateur Scholar
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Solveig Throndardottir
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Ahh! Equals? That is not really how you tend to look at things in a Japanese context. Generally speaking, if you are
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 2, 2008
                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!
                > But, if it's not so cut and dry, then dono and tono are the same,
                > for equals?
                Ahh! Equals? That is not really how you tend to look at things in a
                Japanese
                context. Generally speaking, if you are dealing with someone who is not
                definitely your inferior, you tentatively treat them as a superior.
                There is an
                interesting kyōgen play in which two farmers meet in the forrest on
                their way
                to pay their taxes. They both treat each other as a superior until
                they realize
                that they are both farmers. Also, in a Japanese context, people
                generally
                avoid using names.

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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