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Re: [SCA-JML] Name Game

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  • Andrew Leitch
    sigrune@aol.com writes: Also, sorry to state, women did not strike out much on their own. Women rarely could have a life without family or husband. The few
    Message 1 of 105 , Apr 1, 2004
      sigrune@... writes:

      "Also, sorry to state, women did not strike out much on their own. Women
      rarely could have a life without family or husband. The few that are known
      as famous women in their own rights were either special cases, or society
      somehow fit their place into the ideal of a female role (even if it had to
      be crammed into there with a tetsubo.)"

      Ah... who can really say? History is not recorded objectively is it? As
      long as the guys who write the records think that women should be barefoot
      and pregnant, there's not going to be a whole lot of independently spirited
      women walking through the annuals of history.

      Of course Japan, especially early Japan, seems rich with female figures.
      There's Himiko-hime who got to invade Korea; an Empress (whose name I
      recall not) who fell head over heals for a power hungry priest (thus
      dooming Japan to be forever ruled by men)...

      Why, women authors so dominated early Japanese literature that men were
      taking on female pseudonymns in order to get their pillow books published.
      Women even got to inherit at one point. And if you got married, you had to
      go and live in your wife's household, not the other way around. It almost
      seems as if early Japan kept for a long time many of the trappings of a
      matriarchal state....

      "There also were not many mercinary per-se in Japan... well more
      specifically, nearly everyone was, either that or conscripts. I suppose it
      is possible to be a pirate, but early on, piracy was the provence of a
      handful of clans (and psudo sanctioned, when it was against Korea/China by
      the powers that be) in those cases, it was predominantly male since those
      pirates were drawn from the standard corps of retainers. In later times,
      pirates nearly exclusively prowled the home waters, (inland sea,
      coastlines) and in these cases you are talking brigands with boats."

      As I recall, the Wako (pirates) were legitimate traders most of the time.
      Every so often, the Chinese authorities would, close their borders, outlaw
      sea-trade along their coasts and the Japanese Traders became Wako pirates
      out of necessity.

      - Andre
    • seki_nakagawa
      ... wrote:   I have a Japanese persona my real life better half has a Scottish persona. I am right there with you. My better half s persona is Norse and we
      Message 105 of 105 , Jan 10, 2009
        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, shinomoto yoshinaga <frayyosh@...>
        wrote:
          I have a Japanese persona my real life better half has a Scottish
        persona.

        I am right there with you. My better half's persona is Norse and we
        had a 2 SCA years of discussion as to whether she would take my
        nihonji name or what. She end up assuming a "regional" name and named
        herself Lezlie of Silverhart, which is where we live. I am not even
        sure that Lezlie is norse at all.

        -Sukeie
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