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Movies

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  • Park McKellop
    Read Dashiell Hammet s Red Harvest and then watch Yojimbo. The Bruce Willis flick Last Man Standing was a newer, modern Western copy of Yojimbo. There
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 25, 2004
      Read Dashiell Hammet's "Red Harvest" and then watch Yojimbo.

      The Bruce Willis flick Last Man Standing was a newer, 'modern Western' copy of Yojimbo. There have been so many copies of Kurosawa flicks and Westerns, that your head will spin, and it would probably be difficult to find out which was the 'original' story.

      Alcyoneus


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    • James Eckman
      ... Too true! But since Hammett was writing in the 20 s and 30 s, you will have to find another book as opposed to a film as a source of inspiration. Since he
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 26, 2004
        >
        >
        > From: Park McKellop <squire009@...>
        >Subject: Movies
        >
        >Read Dashiell Hammet's "Red Harvest" and then watch Yojimbo.
        >
        >The Bruce Willis flick Last Man Standing was a newer, 'modern Western' copy of Yojimbo. There have been so many copies of Kurosawa flicks and Westerns, that your head will spin, and it would probably be difficult to find out which was the 'original' story.
        >
        >
        Too true! But since Hammett was writing in the 20's and 30's, you will
        have to find another book as opposed to a film as a source of
        inspiration. Since he was one of the early developers of the tough guy
        private eye novel, he may have come up with it first. Of course I'm a
        bit biased, I think Hammett and Chandler are the two greatest 'tough
        guy' detective writers. For the role players on the list, they translate
        fairly well into Edo jidai adventures as well ;)

        Jim
      • James Eckman
        ... ... Hmm... I suspect some of the other magic may be a bit unhistorical as well ;) Both are great movies. ... One of the streaming services (HULU?) has
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 18, 2012
          > Posted by: "JL Badgley"
          > We love Onmyoji and usually show them to people as an example of what
          > you can do *besides* Sengoku. That said, you have to know a bit
          > about what you are looking at.
          <>
          > Except Mitsumushi. Yeah... J-Pop fan service eye candy, and not in
          > the least bit historical.
          Hmm... I suspect some of the other magic may be a bit unhistorical as
          well ;) Both are great movies.
          > Posted by: "LJonthebay"
          > It certainly doesn't look as it was uploaded by the holder of the copyright though. I'd just as soon support the legitimate efforts of Criterion to restore and release many of these classic films.
          One of the streaming services (HULU?) has legal Criterion selections
          online.
          > Posted by: "richard johnson"
          >
          > Before these Kurosawa films were released in America, there was no way
          > to see them outside an art theater.
          Unless your local PBS channels showed them! Long before Criterion came
          about....

          Jim
        • ladyhallaofmugmort
          ... I do Hulu Plus, and they do have a lot of Japanese content, but you really need to know what exactly you are looking for. I think you have to have plus to
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 18, 2012
            > One of the streaming services (HULU?) has legal Criterion selections
            > online.

            I do Hulu Plus, and they do have a lot of Japanese content, but you really need to know what exactly you are looking for. I think you have to have plus to get into the Criterion selections.

            Halla
          • Katashi Itto
            Yeah I agree the Musical is strictly J-Pop candy, although fun to watch.   Also another point.  What your paying for from Criterion is not the copyright. 
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 18, 2012
              Yeah I agree the Musical is strictly J-Pop candy, although fun to watch.
               
              Also another point.  What your paying for from Criterion is not the copyright. 
              Japanese movies made before 1953 are in public domain. 
              Rahsomon was made in 1950.
              What you are actually paying for is the restored and digital remastering of the masterpiece. 
               
              Which nothing wrong with that, I fully support it, heck I have no problems support Janus/Criterion in general. 

              Katashi Itto

              -Black Lotus Breweries "Proud Makers of "Samurai Swill"
               


              ________________________________
              From: James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...>
              To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 11:43 AM
              Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Movies


               

              > Posted by: "JL Badgley"
              > We love Onmyoji and usually show them to people as an example of what
              > you can do *besides* Sengoku. That said, you have to know a bit
              > about what you are looking at.
              <>
              > Except Mitsumushi. Yeah... J-Pop fan service eye candy, and not in
              > the least bit historical.
              Hmm... I suspect some of the other magic may be a bit unhistorical as
              well ;) Both are great movies.
              > Posted by: "LJonthebay"
              > It certainly doesn't look as it was uploaded by the holder of the copyright though. I'd just as soon support the legitimate efforts of Criterion to restore and release many of these classic films.
              One of the streaming services (HULU?) has legal Criterion selections
              online.
              > Posted by: "richard johnson"
              >
              > Before these Kurosawa films were released in America, there was no way
              > to see them outside an art theater.
              Unless your local PBS channels showed them! Long before Criterion came
              about....

              Jim




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