Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Kabuto question

Expand Messages
  • todd_last
    I m nearing the finishing stages on my kabuto and was wondering what sorts of things people use as a final finish. I spent some time in the Home Depot paint
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 25, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm nearing the finishing stages on my kabuto and was wondering what
      sorts of things people use as a final finish. I spent some time in
      the Home Depot paint section and I'm thinking of using a Rustoleum
      professional primer, then Rustoleum professional high performance
      enamel in gloss black. I also noticed that Rustoleum has a "lacquer"
      in a high gloss black - would that be better? I know this isn't a
      proper urushi, but I don't think I can afford that.

      My other (more costly) ideas are to have it powder coated, then
      sprayed with a clearcoat or to take it to an autobody shop and have
      them spray it with a gloss black and clearcoat.

      Any and all suggestions/advice are thoroughly welcomed and appreciated.

      Nakazawa
    • Donald Luby
      ... What my armourer (Master Zanetto) did when finishing my kabuto was, after several coats of primer, of course, was to apply several coats of high gloss
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 25, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        On Mar 25, 2004, at 9:28 AM, todd_last wrote:

        > I'm nearing the finishing stages on my kabuto and was wondering what
        > sorts of things people use as a final finish. I spent some time in
        > the Home Depot paint section and I'm thinking of using a Rustoleum
        > professional primer, then Rustoleum professional high performance
        > enamel in gloss black. I also noticed that Rustoleum has a "lacquer"
        > in a high gloss black - would that be better? I know this isn't a
        > proper urushi, but I don't think I can afford that.
        >
        > My other (more costly) ideas are to have it powder coated, then
        > sprayed with a clearcoat or to take it to an autobody shop and have
        > them spray it with a gloss black and clearcoat.
        >
        > Any and all suggestions/advice are thoroughly welcomed and appreciated.

        What my armourer (Master Zanetto) did when finishing my kabuto was,
        after several coats of primer, of course, was to apply several coats of
        high gloss Rustoleum, letting each coat dry completely before applying
        the next (it was pretty humid then, I think it took him about a week to
        do four coats), and then applied several coats of a clearcoat. I need
        to repaint my helmet about once every 18 months, but then, I fight in
        ~30 tourneys a year plus a few major wars.

        The problem with having it done at an autobody shop is that while it'll
        be easier for you, certainly, and automotive paints are fairly
        resistant to scratches and whatnot, that process is not really designed
        to stand up to repeated whacking with sticks, so you'll have to get it
        done repeatedly (how often will be determined by how often you fight,
        and how good you are :) to avoid it getting pretty beat-up looking.
        There was one woman, years ago, who did have her helmet painted with
        autobody paint &c, and it held up, but she was also a researcher for
        Pittsburgh Paints, and volunteered to have her helmet used as a test
        subject for an experimental process they were working on; AFAIK, that
        process never became commercially available for what we would think of
        as a reasonable price.

        > Nakazawa


        Sir Koredono
      • Robert Shroyer
        I would recommend that you get black oxide put on it. As long as you have a nice high polish on the helm when you take it in, you should get a gleaming finish
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 25, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          I would recommend that you get black oxide put on it. As long as you have a
          nice high polish on the helm when you take it in, you should get a gleaming
          finish on your black oxide treatment. A buddy of mine took his helmet down
          to a 480 grit sanding finish before he even started buffing and polishing.
          Be sure to spray it with WD 40 and wipe it off with a rag after every
          practice/event.

          This should last you quite a while. If you don't like it, you can soak the
          helmet in a bucket of vinegar for about 48 hours, give it a quick sanding,
          rebuffing and polish, and you can finish it however you want.

          Robert De Gordon





          >From: Donald Luby <djl@...>
          >Reply-To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          >To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          >CC: Donald Luby <djl@...>
          >Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Kabuto question
          >Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 10:34:00 -0500
          >
          >
          >On Mar 25, 2004, at 9:28 AM, todd_last wrote:
          >
          > > I'm nearing the finishing stages on my kabuto and was wondering what
          > > sorts of things people use as a final finish. I spent some time in
          > > the Home Depot paint section and I'm thinking of using a Rustoleum
          > > professional primer, then Rustoleum professional high performance
          > > enamel in gloss black. I also noticed that Rustoleum has a "lacquer"
          > > in a high gloss black - would that be better? I know this isn't a
          > > proper urushi, but I don't think I can afford that.
          > >
          > > My other (more costly) ideas are to have it powder coated, then
          > > sprayed with a clearcoat or to take it to an autobody shop and have
          > > them spray it with a gloss black and clearcoat.
          > >
          > > Any and all suggestions/advice are thoroughly welcomed and appreciated.
          >
          >What my armourer (Master Zanetto) did when finishing my kabuto was,
          >after several coats of primer, of course, was to apply several coats of
          >high gloss Rustoleum, letting each coat dry completely before applying
          >the next (it was pretty humid then, I think it took him about a week to
          >do four coats), and then applied several coats of a clearcoat. I need
          >to repaint my helmet about once every 18 months, but then, I fight in
          >~30 tourneys a year plus a few major wars.
          >
          >The problem with having it done at an autobody shop is that while it'll
          >be easier for you, certainly, and automotive paints are fairly
          >resistant to scratches and whatnot, that process is not really designed
          >to stand up to repeated whacking with sticks, so you'll have to get it
          >done repeatedly (how often will be determined by how often you fight,
          >and how good you are :) to avoid it getting pretty beat-up looking.
          >There was one woman, years ago, who did have her helmet painted with
          >autobody paint &c, and it held up, but she was also a researcher for
          >Pittsburgh Paints, and volunteered to have her helmet used as a test
          >subject for an experimental process they were working on; AFAIK, that
          >process never became commercially available for what we would think of
          >as a reasonable price.
          >
          > > Nakazawa
          >
          >
          >Sir Koredono
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          All the action. All the drama. Get NCAA hoops coverage at MSN Sports by
          ESPN. http://msn.espn.go.com/index.html?partnersite=espn
        • Anthony J. Bryant
          ... A note: It s very hard to sand/polish a multiplate helmet, what with all the ridges and bumps and ribs (and occasionally, standing rivets)... Effingham
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 31, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Robert Shroyer wrote:

            > I would recommend that you get black oxide put on it. As long as you have a
            > nice high polish on the helm when you take it in, you should get a gleaming
            > finish on your black oxide treatment. A buddy of mine took his helmet down
            > to a 480 grit sanding finish before he even started buffing and polishing.
            > Be sure to spray it with WD 40 and wipe it off with a rag after every
            > practice/event.
            >
            > This should last you quite a while. If you don't like it, you can soak the
            > helmet in a bucket of vinegar for about 48 hours, give it a quick sanding,
            > rebuffing and polish, and you can finish it however you want.

            A note:

            It's very hard to sand/polish a multiplate helmet, what with all the ridges and
            bumps and ribs (and occasionally, standing rivets)...


            Effingham
          • Robert Shroyer
            I m actually in the final stages of building an eight plate with overlapping ridges. I do agree that sanding it is a pain but there are a few tools to help out
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              I'm actually in the final stages of building an eight plate with overlapping
              ridges. I do agree that sanding it is a pain but there are a few tools to
              help out along the way.

              1. Be sure to let the helmet top sit in the vinegar for 48 hours. This
              breaks down the mill scale (just about anything actually) and it will save
              you about 8 to 12 hours of sanding.

              2. After plannishing, get an angle grinder with a sanding paddle-wheel and
              hit the whole top with that. After that, i am fortunate enough to have
              available whats called a mouse sander. The mouse sander is a trianglular
              sander that lets you get along the edges of the plates quite nicely.

              Just some tips to help anybody out who needs it.

              Robert Shroyer





              >From: "Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@...>
              >Reply-To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              >To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Kabuto question
              >Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 17:13:41 -0500
              >
              >Robert Shroyer wrote:
              >
              > > I would recommend that you get black oxide put on it. As long as you
              >have a
              > > nice high polish on the helm when you take it in, you should get a
              >gleaming
              > > finish on your black oxide treatment. A buddy of mine took his helmet
              >down
              > > to a 480 grit sanding finish before he even started buffing and
              >polishing.
              > > Be sure to spray it with WD 40 and wipe it off with a rag after every
              > > practice/event.
              > >
              > > This should last you quite a while. If you don't like it, you can soak
              >the
              > > helmet in a bucket of vinegar for about 48 hours, give it a quick
              >sanding,
              > > rebuffing and polish, and you can finish it however you want.
              >
              >A note:
              >
              >It's very hard to sand/polish a multiplate helmet, what with all the ridges
              >and
              >bumps and ribs (and occasionally, standing rivets)...
              >
              >
              >Effingham
              >

              _________________________________________________________________
              Free up your inbox with MSN Hotmail Extra Storage. Multiple plans available.
              http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=en-us&page=hotmail/es2&ST=1/go/onm00200362ave/direct/01/
            • Anthony J. Bryant
              ... As a rule, it s easier if you clean off the metal *before* you start making the armour. Effigham
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Robert Shroyer wrote:

                > I'm actually in the final stages of building an eight plate with overlapping
                > ridges. I do agree that sanding it is a pain but there are a few tools to
                > help out along the way.
                >
                > 1. Be sure to let the helmet top sit in the vinegar for 48 hours. This
                > breaks down the mill scale (just about anything actually) and it will save
                > you about 8 to 12 hours of sanding.
                >
                > 2. After plannishing, get an angle grinder with a sanding paddle-wheel and
                > hit the whole top with that. After that, i am fortunate enough to have
                > available whats called a mouse sander. The mouse sander is a trianglular
                > sander that lets you get along the edges of the plates quite nicely.
                >
                > Just some tips to help anybody out who needs it.
                >

                As a rule, it's easier if you clean off the metal *before* you start making the
                armour. <G>

                Effigham
              • sean ibanez
                ... This makes me second guess my own attempts at building an 8-plate kabuto. I annieled (sp?) the metal plates so I could more easily work the material.
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  >>As a rule, it's easier if you clean off the metal *before* you start making the
                  >>armour. <G>

                  >>Effigham


                  This makes me second guess my own attempts at building an 8-plate kabuto. I annieled (sp?) the metal plates so I could more easily work the material. This in turn creates some fire-scale on the metal--some of which comes off during the dishing out of the plates. I still have to clean most of it off since I have yet to finish, but it makes me wonder if, in your own experience building kabuto, you didn't anniele the materials first. Is this better by SCA standards? As I understand it, working steel that hasn't been annieled may cause the metal to crack.

                  Irobe Saburo Yoriie (from the shadows)

                  "Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@...> wrote:
                  Robert Shroyer wrote:

                  > I'm actually in the final stages of building an eight plate with overlapping
                  > ridges. I do agree that sanding it is a pain but there are a few tools to
                  > help out along the way.
                  >
                  > 1. Be sure to let the helmet top sit in the vinegar for 48 hours. This
                  > breaks down the mill scale (just about anything actually) and it will save
                  > you about 8 to 12 hours of sanding.
                  >
                  > 2. After plannishing, get an angle grinder with a sanding paddle-wheel and
                  > hit the whole top with that. After that, i am fortunate enough to have
                  > available whats called a mouse sander. The mouse sander is a trianglular
                  > sander that lets you get along the edges of the plates quite nicely.
                  >
                  > Just some tips to help anybody out who needs it.
                  >





                  UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


                  Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT


                  ---------------------------------
                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/

                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                  ---------------------------------
                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Anthony J. Bryant
                  ... You re working with small pieces and not dishing them that much. You don t need to anneal them. It s a waste of time, IMO. Effingham
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    sean ibanez wrote:


                    > This makes me second guess my own attempts at building an 8-plate kabuto. I
                    > annieled (sp?) the metal plates so I could more easily work the material.
                    > This in turn creates some fire-scale on the metal--some of which comes off
                    > during the dishing out of the plates. I still have to clean most of it off
                    > since I have yet to finish, but it makes me wonder if, in your own experience
                    > building kabuto, you didn't anniele the materials first. Is this better by
                    > SCA standards? As I understand it, working steel that hasn't been annieled
                    > may cause the metal to crack.
                    >

                    You're working with small pieces and not dishing them that much. You don't need
                    to anneal them. It's a waste of time, IMO.


                    Effingham
                  • Robert Shroyer
                    Sean, I m not sure if your question was pointed towards myself or Baron Effingham, so i ll once again drop in my two cents and hopefully it helps. My Kabuto
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Sean,

                      I'm not sure if your question was pointed towards myself or Baron Effingham,
                      so i'll once again drop in my two cents and hopefully it helps.

                      My Kabuto was made from 14g sheet steel from a sheet metal supplier in my
                      local area. After cutting the plates and removing the mill scale, i proceded
                      to dish them using good old brute force. I did not notice any fatigue lines
                      or cracking at all. Your mileage may vary though.

                      I wish i could be more helpful but i've never annieled (can't spell either)
                      anything, so my experience with that process is nil. I will say this, out of
                      the dozen or so helms that our shop has produced, i've never heard of any
                      cracked plates or panels.

                      Robert Shroyer




                      >From: sean ibanez <sean_ibanez@...>
                      >Reply-To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Kabuto question
                      >Date: Fri, 2 Apr 2004 11:55:24 -0800 (PST)
                      >
                      > >>As a rule, it's easier if you clean off the metal *before* you start
                      >making the
                      > >>armour. <G>
                      >
                      > >>Effigham
                      >
                      >
                      >This makes me second guess my own attempts at building an 8-plate kabuto.
                      >I annieled (sp?) the metal plates so I could more easily work the material.
                      > This in turn creates some fire-scale on the metal--some of which comes
                      >off during the dishing out of the plates. I still have to clean most of it
                      >off since I have yet to finish, but it makes me wonder if, in your own
                      >experience building kabuto, you didn't anniele the materials first. Is
                      >this better by SCA standards? As I understand it, working steel that
                      >hasn't been annieled may cause the metal to crack.
                      >
                      >Irobe Saburo Yoriie (from the shadows)
                      >
                      >"Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@...> wrote:
                      >Robert Shroyer wrote:
                      >
                      > > I'm actually in the final stages of building an eight plate with
                      >overlapping
                      > > ridges. I do agree that sanding it is a pain but there are a few tools
                      >to
                      > > help out along the way.
                      > >
                      > > 1. Be sure to let the helmet top sit in the vinegar for 48 hours. This
                      > > breaks down the mill scale (just about anything actually) and it will
                      >save
                      > > you about 8 to 12 hours of sanding.
                      > >
                      > > 2. After plannishing, get an angle grinder with a sanding paddle-wheel
                      >and
                      > > hit the whole top with that. After that, i am fortunate enough to have
                      > > available whats called a mouse sander. The mouse sander is a trianglular
                      > > sander that lets you get along the edges of the plates quite nicely.
                      > >
                      > > Just some tips to help anybody out who needs it.
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      >
                      >Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
                      >
                      >
                      >---------------------------------
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/
                      >
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      >sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >---------------------------------
                      >Do you Yahoo!?
                      >Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      _________________________________________________________________
                      Watch LIVE baseball games on your computer with MLB.TV, included with MSN
                      Premium!
                      http://join.msn.com/?page=features/mlb&pgmarket=en-us/go/onm00200439ave/direct/01/
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.