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kataginu

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  • echo2501
    Wondering... do the sides get sewn up or is it completely open on the sides, just going from front over to the back?
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 26, 2003
      Wondering... do the sides get sewn up or is it completely open on
      the sides, just going from front over to the back?
    • Bubba
      ... Completely open on the sides. -- Kagemasa mysticz28@swbell.net He who seeks will find, and he who knocks will be let in.
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 26, 2003
        echo2501 wrote:
        > Wondering... do the sides get sewn up or is it completely open on
        > the sides, just going from front over to the back?

        Completely open on the sides.
        --
        Kagemasa
        mysticz28@...
        He who seeks will find, and he who knocks will be let in.
      • Solveig
        Nolbe Cousins! Greetings from Solveig ... That is correct. The things do not have sleaves at all. The front turns into tails that resemble fat himo which get
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 26, 2003
          Nolbe Cousins!

          Greetings from Solveig

          >echo2501 wrote:
          >> Wondering... do the sides get sewn up or is it completely open on
          >> the sides, just going from front over to the back?
          >
          >Completely open on the sides.

          That is correct. The things do not have sleaves at all. The front turns
          into tails that resemble fat himo which get pushed into the hakama. You
          sometimes see people pull these out during a seppuku scene in movies. You
          should note that the kataginu originated around 1550 and was used as
          ceremonial attire by members of the buke.
          --

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
          | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
          | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
          | the trash by my email filters. |
          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        • Ii Saburou
          Completely open. It was kind of weird at first. -Ii
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 26, 2003
            Completely open. It was kind of weird at first.

            -Ii

            On Wed, 26 Nov 2003, echo2501 wrote:

            > Wondering... do the sides get sewn up or is it completely open on
            > the sides, just going from front over to the back?
            >
            >
            >
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          • echo2501
            ... You ... as ... I thought that a kosode and hakama was still considered underdressed for public dress and a kataginu or hitatare was worn as well. I was
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 28, 2003
              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig <nostrand@a...> wrote:
              You
              > should note that the kataginu originated around 1550 and was used
              as
              > ceremonial attire by members of the buke.

              I thought that a kosode and hakama was still considered underdressed
              for public dress and a kataginu or hitatare was worn as well. I was
              considering a persona around the 1560-1570's (Momoyama period?).
              Would this be too late?

              Thanks,
              -Luis
              (currently kicking around "Akiyama Seiichiro (Seiichi?) Mitsusada")

              ps. recently got "Name Construction in Medieval Japan" via the
              library. Wow! I have to own this book!
            • Elaine Koogler
              No, it wouldn t be. The kataginu was worn at that time and, if you were to continue the time line into the Edo period, you d see it changing into the pleated
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 29, 2003
                No, it wouldn't be. The kataginu was worn at that time and, if you were to continue the time line into the Edo period, you'd see it changing into the pleated garment worn then.

                Kiri

                Everybody can be great ... because anybody can serve.
                You don't have to have a college degree to serve.
                You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve.
                You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.
                >
                > - Martin Luther King, Jr.

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: echo2501
                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 11:02 PM
                Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: kataginu


                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig <nostrand@a...> wrote:
                You
                > should note that the kataginu originated around 1550 and was used
                as
                > ceremonial attire by members of the buke.

                I thought that a kosode and hakama was still considered underdressed
                for public dress and a kataginu or hitatare was worn as well. I was
                considering a persona around the 1560-1570's (Momoyama period?).
                Would this be too late?

                Thanks,
                -Luis
                (currently kicking around "Akiyama Seiichiro (Seiichi?) Mitsusada")

                ps. recently got "Name Construction in Medieval Japan" via the
                library. Wow! I have to own this book!


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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Anthony J. Bryant
                ... You are correct; it didn t become formal until the Edo period. Formal is, of course, a slight mis-stating of the actual function. It was the formal duty
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 30, 2003
                  echo2501 wrote:


                  > I thought that a kosode and hakama was still considered underdressed
                  > for public dress and a kataginu or hitatare was worn as well. I was
                  > considering a persona around the 1560-1570's (Momoyama period?).

                  You are correct; it didn't become "formal" until the Edo period. Formal is, of
                  course, a slight mis-stating of the actual function. It was the formal "duty
                  uniform" and would approximate to a suit and tie, such as would be worn "on
                  duty" in the office. For the *really* formal court settings, other outfits were
                  typically proscribed for those of upper rank, but the kamishimo would suffice
                  for most.

                  > (currently kicking around "Akiyama Seiichiro (Seiichi?) Mitsusada")

                  Either Seiichir├┤ or Seiichi would be fine; no problems. The name is splendid.

                  Effingham
                • echo2501
                  ... Ah, okay. So, it would be fine to wear just kosode/hakama. I was wondering about that. Thanks. The kataginu that I ve made so far are just the pre-Edo
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 2 8:21 AM
                    > No, it wouldn't be. The kataginu was worn at that time and, if you
                    > were to continue the time line into the Edo period, you'd see it
                    > changing into the pleated garment worn then.

                    -------------------------------

                    > You are correct; it didn't become "formal" until the Edo period.
                    > Formal is, of course, a slight mis-stating of the actual function.
                    > It was the formal "duty uniform" and would approximate to a suit
                    > and tie, such as would be worn "on duty" in the office. For the
                    > *really* formal court settings, other outfits were typically
                    > proscribed for those of upper rank, but the kamishimo would
                    > suffice for most.

                    Ah, okay. So, it would be fine to wear just kosode/hakama. I was
                    wondering about that. Thanks. The kataginu that I've made so far
                    are just the pre-Edo rectangular ones.

                    > Either Seiichir├┤ or Seiichi would be fine; no problems. The name
                    > is splendid.

                    Thanks! Seiichiro it is. Only took three years of complete
                    indecisiveness. :)

                    - Seiichiro
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