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kikko thickness?

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  • Karl Jacobs
    Greetings, I am in the process of making a new suit of armor for myself. Looking at Effingham-dono s site, I found the information on kikko (hexagonal
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 26, 2003
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      Greetings,

      I am in the process of making a new suit of armor for myself. Looking
      at Effingham-dono's site, I found the information on kikko (hexagonal
      plates), and I'm wondering what thickness of steel to use. My thought
      is 18 ga. stainless or 16 ga. mild steel, but I'm wondering if this is
      approximately a good thickness.

      Any suggestions for cutting the hexagons out of sheet steel? If I lay
      them out in a hexagonal grid (like a roleplaying game tabletop mat),
      this makes best use of available material, but looks like I'll need to
      cut the steel with a chisel, as there isn't really enough room for a
      blade to turn.

      If I lay them out in a point-to-point fashion, this makes it easier for
      cutting with a bandsaw or jigsaw, but wastes some material.

      Any suggestions?

      Arigato,
      Kou Toshikage
    • Bubba
      ... It depends on the size. The oen we have are about an inch and a half and 16 ga. if I remember right. ... A CNC punch does a great job ;) -- Kagemasa
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 26, 2003
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        Karl Jacobs wrote:
        >
        > I am in the process of making a new suit of armor for myself. Looking
        > at Effingham-dono's site, I found the information on kikko (hexagonal
        > plates), and I'm wondering what thickness of steel to use. My thought
        > is 18 ga. stainless or 16 ga. mild steel, but I'm wondering if this is
        > approximately a good thickness.

        It depends on the size. The oen we have are about an inch and a half and 16
        ga. if I remember right.

        > Any suggestions for cutting the hexagons out of sheet steel? If I lay
        > them out in a hexagonal grid (like a roleplaying game tabletop mat),
        > this makes best use of available material, but looks like I'll need to
        > cut the steel with a chisel, as there isn't really enough room for a
        > blade to turn.
        >
        > If I lay them out in a point-to-point fashion, this makes it easier
        > for cutting with a bandsaw or jigsaw, but wastes some material.

        A CNC punch does a great job ;)
        --
        Kagemasa
        mysticz28@...
        He who seeks will find, and he who knocks will be let in.
      • Donald Luby
        ... My general feeling on armor steel thickness goes like this: 12 ga - 16 ga for a helmet 16 ga - 20 ga for large body plates, or areas covering fragile parts
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 26, 2003
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          On Nov 26, 2003, at 10:26 AM, Karl Jacobs wrote:

          > Greetings,
          >
          > I am in the process of making a new suit of armor for myself. Looking
          > at Effingham-dono's site, I found the information on kikko (hexagonal
          > plates), and I'm wondering what thickness of steel to use. My thought
          > is 18 ga. stainless or 16 ga. mild steel, but I'm wondering if this is
          > approximately a good thickness.

          My general feeling on armor steel thickness goes like this:

          12 ga - 16 ga for a helmet
          16 ga - 20 ga for large body plates, or areas covering fragile parts
          (throat, forearm)
          18 ga - 22 ga for smaller (especially overlapped) plates

          and going towards lighted for plates that that are not going to be held
          firmly to the body, and thus have more 'give' before the shot reaches
          the body itself.

          So, extrapolating that all out, that gives

          14 ga +/- kabuto
          18 ga +/- do (incl sode), kote, & nodawa
          20 ga +/- kusazuri, haidate, suneate

          Unless you're in a neavier-hitting area, or you have a previous injury
          that you'd like to protect in particular, I see no need in really going
          heavier, and I can see going lighter if you perceive the increase in
          mobility will more than compensate for the lack of protection (or, if
          you just can't handle wearing a kit that heavy).

          > Any suggestions for cutting the hexagons out of sheet steel? If I lay
          > them out in a hexagonal grid (like a roleplaying game tabletop mat),
          > this makes best use of available material, but looks like I'll need to
          > cut the steel with a chisel, as there isn't really enough room for a
          > blade to turn.
          >
          > If I lay them out in a point-to-point fashion, this makes it easier for
          > cutting with a bandsaw or jigsaw, but wastes some material.
          >
          > Any suggestions?
          >
          > Arigato,
          > Kou Toshikage


          Sir Koredono
        • Yama Kaminari no Date Saburou Yukiie
          Konnichi wa tomodachi, Historical kikko for collars, knees, and the occasional kote measured about 3/4 of an inch point to point, and could be made out of 20ga
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 26, 2003
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            Konnichi wa tomodachi,
            Historical kikko for collars, knees, and the occasional kote measured
            about 3/4 of an inch point to point, and could be made out of 20ga or
            18 ga metal. With four holes in each piece, and being slightly dished
            (put each plate in a dishing stump and give them each a single womp
            with a large ball peen hammer) and sandwhich them between a few layers
            of heavy fabric or medium weight leather.
            Some do were made of larger hex shaped pieces, and some haidate were
            also made of slightly larger hex shaped pieces. Depending on the use,
            I would not go larger than a an inch and a half for the largest of them.
            Sir Koredono's approxamations of metal thickness are quite good, and I
            agree with him on the idea that one need not "over-do" armor too much
            just for SCA purposes. It is possible to get a fine looking kit
            together without making it look too bulkey, or making it weigh too much.

            Date Saburou Yukiie
            Yama Kaminari Ryu
            Shi wa hei to de aru - all are equal in the grave...
            http://www.kabutographics.com
            kabuto@...
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