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clothing patterns

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  • karl.j.jacobs@jci.com
    Kodansha International has a book entitled How to Make Your Own Japanese Clothes or something similar to that. Sorry, but I don t have my copy here with
    Message 1 of 5 , May 30, 2000
      Kodansha International has a book entitled "How to Make Your Own Japanese
      Clothes" or something similar to that. Sorry, but I don't have my copy
      here with me, so I can't give you the exact title, author's name and ISBN.

      The information in the book allows you to make garments fitted to your
      exact measurements! I know only a little about clothing, so it is only a
      guess based on my slim research that much of what is in the book is out of
      period. However, there are good gentles here who are much more scholarly
      than I am, and could give a definitive answer.

      BTW, Folkwear patterns carries a hakama pattern that looks more accurate to
      our period than the generic martial arts hakama many people wear when
      starting out. They carry other patterns as well, but most of those
      garments are also covered in the above-mentioned book.


      Kou no Toshikage
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousins! There are two books floating around bookstores at the moment which you may be interested in. 1) The Tale of Murasaki by Liza Dalbi. I just got
      Message 2 of 5 , May 30, 2000
        Noble Cousins!

        There are two books floating around bookstores at the moment which you
        may be interested in.

        1) The Tale of Murasaki by Liza Dalbi.
        I just got this, but it generally looks pretty good. Liza Dalbi
        is the cultural anthropologist who became an apprentice geisha.
        At the moment, I think that people really ought to consider
        buying and reading this book.

        2) Secrets of the Samurai by Ratti & Westbrook
        Despite the bibliography and the original publisher, this thing
        is a piece of fluff-ware which you should not waste your money on
        when there are so many much better books around.

        Why is this book fluff? Well poke through a few pages. It sort
        of oohs and ahhs a lot about the supposed secrets of the Samurai
        (pretty much exclusively post 1600) while giving no or inaccurate
        information. It gets Buddhism wrong (somehow despite one of the
        authors supposeably having a degree in religion or some such thing)
        it says vapid things about sumo and the list just goes on and on
        and on. This book gets a BARF ratting of 3 barf bags. Yes, I bought
        the thing, mainly because I wanted to know what people who might
        show up on this mailing list have been reading.

        Save your money to buy Dalbi's book.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

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      • Kass McGann
        The clothing patterns in How to Make Your Own Japanese Clothes are thoroughly modern and therefore only marginally useful to us. In period (and even in
        Message 3 of 5 , May 31, 2000
          The clothing patterns in "How to Make Your Own Japanese Clothes" are
          thoroughly modern and therefore only marginally useful to us. In
          period (and even in modern traditional clothing), fabric was cut
          according to fabric width, not to body size. The Japanese had a
          great dislike of showing the shape of the body (thus the
          voluminousness of the female court garb...). Jonh Marshall's book
          gives great construction techniques, but one should never cut their
          Japanese garb "to fit".

          Folkwear's hakama pattern in also modern. The only book out there
          that shows period patterns for Japanese garb is a book Hiraizumi-dono
          mentioned before with "nuikata" in the title. Sorry that I can't
          remember the rest of the title off the top of my head right now. But
          patterns from this Japanese-only book will be available in his
          upcoming CA...

          Aoi
        • Barbara Nostrand
          Noble Cousins! I didn t want to answer first on this one, but yes How to Maker Your Own Japanese Clothes is on my list of apparently useful, but actually
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 1 9:49 AM
            Noble Cousins!

            I didn't want to answer first on this one, but yes "How to Maker Your
            Own Japanese Clothes" is on my list of apparently useful, but actually
            harmful books. The whole notion of fitted clothing is essentially
            Western. This does not mean that the clothing simply hangs without
            regard for the body. Both Japanese and Turkish clothing is adjusted
            to the body by useing a system of ties. However, this does not imply
            an hour-glass silloette. Contemporary kimono are padded in a number
            of ways which change the silloette from that of the body to something
            rather different. Ideally, Tokugawa women looked somewhat reedlike.
            (Note. The Tokugawa period is post-period for us.)

            There are Japanese books out there from which Baron Edward is
            preparing a CA issue. If you wish to obtain the originals, they
            can be ordered on-line from kinokuniya or you can call one of
            their local stores and buy them through a local store. I prefer
            the web page, but you must be able to deal with Japanese on
            your computer to use it.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

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          • Barbara Nostrand
            Noble Cousins! I promissed someone that I would try to help them during my visit to Toronto. Well, I am now in Toronto for the week. The number here is
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 19, 2000
              Noble Cousins!

              I promissed someone that I would try to help them during my visit to
              Toronto. Well, I am now in Toronto for the week. The number here is
              516-3571. Please call and ask for me. I am going to spend a couple of
              days at Fort Book as it is and would enjoy company for part of it.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
              --
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              | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
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