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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Sword stuff, was: Looking for patterns for Edo period Kamishimo

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  • Bubba
    ... The few times I ve messed with the real thing (ok, once ;) I m apparently not affected by it much. No more than working with carbon fiber. There are a
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 3, 2003
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      Solveig wrote:
      >
      > Greetings from Solveig! I can tell you where to buy lacquer in the
      > Tokyo area. (It's a very large craft store complex in Kamata.) They
      > may even do mail order. I don't know whether U.S. customs will be
      > particularly happy about letting it in. As for appearance. I you are
      > familiar with real lacquer, then the difference can be quite apparent.

      The few times I've messed with the real thing (ok, once ;) I'm apparently
      not affected by it much. No more than working with carbon fiber. There are a
      whole lot more dangerous things in my garage than lacquer. Methlyene
      chloride comes to mind ;)

      That said, I prefer using epoxy based paint instead of lacquer since it's
      very humid in this part of Ansteorra and epoxy is waterproof. Also easier to
      match it if you ever have to fix it (not likely).
      --
      Kagemasa
      mysticz28@...
      He who seeks will find, and he who knocks will be let in.
    • DP Gregersen
      I m not a botonist, but the urushi tree is a distant relation of poison oak, and the sickness produces similar symptoms. Just as some people are affected more
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 3, 2003
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        I'm not a botonist, but the urushi tree is a distant relation of
        poison oak, and the sickness produces similar symptoms.

        Just as some people are affected more by poison oak than others, it
        would seem to be the same with urushi. Artisans who work with the
        stuff regularly do develop a tolerance. I saw a video once of
        someone smearing it on with fingers with no ill effects.

        Do be careful, but as long as you don't get it on yourself, you
        should probably be ok. As far as importing it, it seems to be a
        gray area. Paint is paint, most likely as far as customs is
        concerned.



        > The few times I've messed with the real thing (ok, once ;) I'm
        apparently
        > not affected by it much. No more than working with carbon fiber.
        There are a
        > whole lot more dangerous things in my garage than lacquer. Methlyene
        > chloride comes to mind ;)
        >
      • Bubba
        ... From what I understand the two plants have the same poison. If that s the case it won t do anything to me at all. I can roll naked in poison ivy and
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 7, 2003
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          DP Gregersen wrote:
          > I'm not a botonist, but the urushi tree is a distant relation of
          > poison oak, and the sickness produces similar symptoms.

          From what I understand the two plants have the same poison. If that's the
          case it won't do anything to me at all. I can roll naked in poison ivy and
          nothing happens... well, the poison ivy and anyone watching might get upset
          ;)

          > Do be careful, but as long as you don't get it on yourself, you
          > should probably be ok. As far as importing it, it seems to be a
          > gray area. Paint is paint, most likely as far as customs is
          > concerned.

          There are places to get it domestically, but I've been doing a bit of
          reading and have found that there are better wearing things out there. Epoxy
          and automotive paint being very high on the list. Not period, but good for
          things that will actually be worn regularly.
          --
          Kagemasa
          mysticz28@...
          He who seeks will find, and he who knocks will be let in.
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