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Re: [SCA-JML] "Arigatou"

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  • Ron Martino
    ... The general opinion from Those Who Should Know(tm) is that it s simply a coincidence. There are any number of such similarities between languages (name /
    Message 1 of 6 , May 9, 2000
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      > I was recently informed of something that I am trying to check into and
      > wondered if people could help. One of my friends strode up rather
      > confidently to me today to explain that "Arigatou" was originally
      > Portugese (Abrigado) and has since come to be a purely Japanese word for
      > most Japanese people. His only source was that his Japanese girlfriend
      > had told him this.
      >
      > Can anyone confirm or deny this rumor? Or at least suggest where I look
      > for more info? I am checking the web now as well, and I will let the list
      > know what I come up with if noone else replies.
      >
      > Arigatou,
      >
      > -Godric Logan

      The general opinion from Those Who Should Know(tm) is that it's simply
      a coincidence. There are any number of such similarities between
      languages (name / namae comes to mind also), but some, like this one,
      seem to gain general, if mistaken, acceptance as proof of foreign
      origin.

      The question has been asked many times on sci.lang.japan, and a search
      of Dejanews should turn up a much better answer then mine. The
      Portuguese word is apparently spelled obrigado, by the way.

      Yumitori (definitely not among Those Who Should Know(tm))

      --
      yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com - Ask me how to get paid for surfing the
      Internet.
    • Joshua Badgley
      ... Thank you. (Arigatou! :) I looked up Arigatou and Obrigado together and found many links, most of them to www.hayamasa.demon.co.uk (which doesn t seem to
      Message 2 of 6 , May 9, 2000
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        On Tue, 9 May 2000, Ron Martino wrote:

        > The general opinion from Those Who Should Know(tm) is that it's simply
        > a coincidence. There are any number of such similarities between
        > languages (name / namae comes to mind also), but some, like this one,
        > seem to gain general, if mistaken, acceptance as proof of foreign
        > origin.
        >
        > The question has been asked many times on sci.lang.japan, and a search
        > of Dejanews should turn up a much better answer then mine. The
        > Portuguese word is apparently spelled obrigado, by the way.
        >
        Thank you. (Arigatou! :)


        I looked up Arigatou and Obrigado together and found many links, most of
        them to www.hayamasa.demon.co.uk (which doesn't seem to work for me,
        btw) and the sci.lang.japan FAQ. Even though I couldn't read most of the
        pages, their descriptions contained enough info to answer my question,
        although I still don't have any references to back it up (all I really ned
        is to find a usage before the arrival of the Portugese, really).


        Anyway, one page had the following explanation of the roots of 'arigatou':

        arigatasi -> arigataku gozarimasu -> arigata(k)u goza(r)imasu -> arigatau
        -> arigatou


        Arigataku gozarimasu!



        ;)


        -Godric Logan
      • Ron Martino
        ... Ben Bullock s Alternative FAQ is off-line for the foreseeable future, apparently. I d suggest paying attention to the posts of Jim Breen and Gerald
        Message 3 of 6 , May 9, 2000
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          > I looked up Arigatou and Obrigado together and found many links, most of
          > them to www.hayamasa.demon.co.uk (which doesn't seem to work for me,
          > btw) and the sci.lang.japan FAQ. Even though I couldn't read most of the
          > pages, their descriptions contained enough info to answer my question,
          > although I still don't have any references to back it up (all I really ned
          > is to find a usage before the arrival of the Portugese, really).

          Ben Bullock's "Alternative FAQ" is off-line for the foreseeable future,
          apparently. I'd suggest paying attention to the posts of Jim Breen and
          Gerald (Bart) Mathius (sp?) on sci.lang.japan.

          > Anyway, one page had the following explanation of the roots of 'arigatou':
          >
          > arigatasi -> arigataku gozarimasu -> arigata(k)u goza(r)imasu -> arigatau
          > -> arigatou
          >

          > -Godric Logan

          This raises the question - is there an equivalent to the OED for
          Japanese?

          Yumitori

          --
          yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com - Ask me how to get paid for surfing the
          Internet.
        • Joshua Badgley
          ... My Japanese friends here tell me to try Koujien . Sorry, don t know what the kanji would be. These are students, not Japanese language professors, but
          Message 4 of 6 , May 9, 2000
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            On Tue, 9 May 2000, Ron Martino wrote:

            > This raises the question - is there an equivalent to the OED for
            > Japanese?
            >
            My Japanese friends here tell me to try "Koujien". Sorry, don't know
            what the kanji would be. These are students, not Japanese language
            professors, but they say it is pretty well known.


            -Godric Logan
          • Barbara Nostrand
            Noble Cousin! Just check any of the mega Japanese dictionaries. I own Daijirin. (Yes, I was influenced by the advertising in the trains.) Regardless, pretty
            Message 5 of 6 , May 15, 2000
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              Noble Cousin!

              Just check any of the mega Japanese dictionaries. I own Daijirin.
              (Yes, I was influenced by the advertising in the trains.) Regardless,
              pretty much any of the mega dictionaries will tell you the etymology
              of such words. For example, tempura is a Portugese word.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar

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            • Ron Martino
              Recently, the question of the origins of arigatou came up. I wanted to point to the Alternative sci.lang.japan Frequently Asked Questions (long story as to
              Message 6 of 6 , May 24, 2000
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                Recently, the question of the origins of 'arigatou' came up. I wanted
                to point to the "Alternative sci.lang.japan Frequently Asked Questions"
                (long story as to why it's the 'alternative' one) for an answer, but it
                was no longer on line. This has now been remedied. As a basic source of
                information on Nihongo, it is well worth bookmarking. Go to
                http://www.dgs.monash.edu.au/~jwb/afaq/afaq.html.

                Yumitori

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                Internet.
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