Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Clothing help.

Expand Messages
  • Ron Martino
    This message was just forwarded to me. Fujiwara-hime, I sent them to reconstructinghistory.com, but you might want to contact them directly... Yumitori ...
    Message 1 of 4 , May 8, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      This message was just forwarded to me. Fujiwara-hime, I sent them to
      reconstructinghistory.com, but you might want to contact them
      directly...

      Yumitori

      ---

      Subject: Simple (?) Japanese garb
      Date: Mon, 8 May 2000 23:47:36 -0400
      From: Eva Grammer <kattmeow@...>
      Reply-To: "Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) -Garb"
      <SCA-GARB@...>
      To: SCA-GARB@...

      Now it's time for my question...

      My daughter, age nine, is determined that she wants a Japanese persona.
      (She would make a cute Irish girl, as she's fair-skinned and
      red-haired!) I've tried to steer her away from it, but she's bound and
      determined.

      I've done some preliminiary research on the Net and found the costuming
      for the time period we're looking at looks daunting, to say the least,
      and hot. I don't remember the term, but it's the style where they wear
      10-20 layers of stuff. I saw a chart on one of the sites that gave
      directions for summer wear (down to 2 layers), but I'm still clueless.
      Basically, the first garments I've ever sewn have been these past few
      weeks, and all I've done is an underdress (T-tunic), overdress
      (T-tunic), and 2 peplos dresses (tubes). Are there patterns for
      Japanese garb in period? If not, is there a technique to sewing these
      garments?

      Also, I'm pretty sure we're talking silk here. I've heard silk is hard
      to sew. Also, it's pricey. So, sources for silk? Or is there
      something else I can use that would still look authentic?

      Can anyone help me with this?

      Cynwise æt Sceaduwode
      mka Eva Grammer
      Vulpine Reach, Meridies

      --
      yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com - Ask me how to get paid for surfing the
      Internet.
    • Joshua Badgley
      Greetings and Salutations to you all, I was recently informed of something that I am trying to check into and wondered if people could help. One of my friends
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Greetings and Salutations to you all,

        I was recently informed of something that I am trying to check into and
        wondered if people could help. One of my friends strode up rather
        confidently to me today to explain that "Arigatou" was originally
        Portugese (Abrigado) and has since come to be a purely Japanese word for
        most Japanese people. His only source was that his Japanese girlfriend
        had told him this.

        Can anyone confirm or deny this rumor? Or at least suggest where I look
        for more info? I am checking the web now as well, and I will let the list
        know what I come up with if noone else replies.


        Arigatou,

        -Godric Logan
      • Barbara Nostrand
        Noble Cousin! Although I not one of the clothing experts on this mailing list, the term just ended and I can t resist saying something. First of all. You
        Message 3 of 4 , May 15, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Noble Cousin!

          Although I not one of the clothing experts on this mailing list,
          the term just ended and I can't resist saying something.

          First of all. You should consider exactly what social class your
          child wants to belong to. Further, the clothing that children wore
          (even those of the court) were somewhat different than the clothing
          worn by adults.

          Your child is nine years old. Coming of age would not occur for her
          for another three years. The clothing that she would be wearing at
          this point is somewhat simpler. (This is what I have seen so far at
          least.)

          Note. The coming of age ceremony in Japan is the "first uniform"
          ceremony. There is a distinct shift in clothing which occurs
          at about age 12. This can still be seen today. Generally
          speaking, elementary school children do not wear uniforms
          to school (except for the rather uniform hats and backpacks),
          but secondary school students do wear school uniforms.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

          +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
          | de Moivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
          | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
          +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Ignored domains: bestbiz.net, pop.net, hotmail.com, aibusiness.com |
          | vdi.net, usa.net, tpnet.pl, myremarq.com |
          | netscape.net, excite.com, bigfoot.com, public.com |
          | com.tw, eranet.net, yahoo.com, success.net |
          | mailcity.com, net.tw, twac.com, netcenter.com |
          | techie.com |
          +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
        • Ron Martino
          ... Solveig-sensei, please note that the message you are responding to was forwarded to this list, not originally posted here. I believe that I included the
          Message 4 of 4 , May 15, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            > Although I not one of the clothing experts on this mailing list,
            > the term just ended and I can't resist saying something.
            >
            > First of all. You should consider exactly what social class your
            > child wants to belong to. Further, the clothing that children wore
            > (even those of the court) were somewhat different than the clothing
            > worn by adults.
            >
            > Your child is nine years old. Coming of age would not occur for her
            > for another three years. The clothing that she would be wearing at
            > this point is somewhat simpler. (This is what I have seen so far at
            > least.)

            > Your Humble Servant
            > Solveig Throndardottir
            > Amateur Scholar

            Solveig-sensei, please note that the message you are responding to was
            forwarded to this list, not originally posted here. I believe that I
            included the original headers if you wish to send the lady a personal
            reply. If I failed to do so, let me know and I'll get the appropriate
            information.

            Yumitori

            --
            yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com - Ask me how to get paid for surfing the
            Internet.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.