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Re: [SCA-JML] hellooooo

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  • Joshua Badgley
    ... Me too! Me too! . . . Oh, wait, that s right. -Godric Logan, who keeps forgetting where he is at the moment.
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 30 8:58 PM
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      On Sun, 30 Apr 2000, Barbara Nostrand wrote:

      > Noble Cousins!
      >
      > >bambooni@... wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >> I'm here. I'm just in the middle of having a house built. I'm in the waiting
      > >> for permits stage....But once they go through I'm going to have about 1/2 an
      > >> acre to put a Japanese style garden in.....
      > >
      > >Please understand that I say this with all respect and affection.
      > >
      > >I hate you, you bastard. <g>
      > >
      > >
      > >Effingham
      >
      > May I be permitted to hate both of you? Bamboo for your house and garden
      > and Baron Edward for you many trips to Japan and writing/publishing
      > ability.
      >
      Me too! Me too!
      .
      .
      .
      Oh, wait, that's right.


      -Godric Logan, who keeps forgetting where he is at the moment.
    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... Well, unless you re actually Shinto, why do it? Although these are scenic little things, they are still religious thingies that mean things to people. I ve
      Message 2 of 25 , May 1, 2000
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        bambooni@... wrote:

        >
        > That's a lot of trees that I need to clear. And since we are on that
        > subject. What I want to try is to use some of those trees for lumber and make
        > a Tori for somewhere in the garden. Anybody got any suggestions on placement
        > or design?? And how big should I make it???

        Well, unless you're actually Shinto, why do it? Although these are scenic little
        things, they are still religious thingies that mean things to people. I've never
        been a big fan of using religious things for decoration (don't get me started on
        popslutstars who wear big crosses as jewelry).

        Now, on the other hand, you can build a *real* small shrine (typically about the
        size of a portable TV) in the garden; there are several different styles of
        yashira you can use, depending on how talented/ambitious you are, and how much
        you want to blow on decoration. You don't need a torii per se (you can use a
        knotted rope with streamers instead). If you want to make the standing yashira,
        a torii just wide enough to admit you and just tall enough that you don't have
        to stoop leading to a six foot path in front of it wouldn't be too odd.

        Effingham
      • Barbara Nostrand
        Noble Cousins! You should understand that torii are gates for gods to enter and leave their shrines. I was once told that every shrine has a path leading to
        Message 3 of 25 , May 1, 2000
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          Noble Cousins!

          You should understand that torii are gates for gods to enter and leave
          their shrines. I was once told that every shrine has a path leading
          to either a mountain or to the sea from which the god comes. Regardless,
          you do not have to build a miniature house or anything like that in order
          to have torii. (At least small ones.) I have seen torii set up in front
          of springs issuing from the roots of trees and stuff like that. These
          trees are often encircled by ropes with streamers, &c. Regardless, you
          need to enshrine something to have a torii. Essentially you have to
          have a central icon or something which embodies the god. This can
          be housed in some sort of building (big or small).

          Note. While Japanese have imported Buddhism to North America, Shintoh
          has mostly been left at home.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

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        • bambooni@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/1/00 11:26:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Are there pictures somewhere that I can see? depending on how talented/ambitious you are, and
          Message 4 of 25 , May 3, 2000
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            In a message dated 5/1/00 11:26:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            ajbryant@... writes:

            > there are several different styles of
            > yashira you can use,
            Are there pictures somewhere that I can see?


            depending on how talented/ambitious you are, and how
            > much
            > you want to blow on decoration.
            All my money is going into the house. so anything I get for the garden that's
            big I'm going to have to hopefully make myself.

            Takabayashi Genpachi
          • Anthony J. Bryant
            ... Most books on historical J. architecture have diagrams of a dozen or so shrine types. But you ll want something more specific; miniature shrine thingies.
            Message 5 of 25 , May 4, 2000
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              bambooni@... wrote:

              >
              > > there are several different styles of
              > > yashira you can use,
              > Are there pictures somewhere that I can see?

              Most books on historical J. architecture have diagrams of a dozen or so shrine
              types. But you'll want something more specific; miniature shrine thingies.

              When I get back from Japan, remind me and I'll send you some photos. I have a
              couple, but plan on taking a few more.

              Effingham
            • bambooni@aol.com
              In a message dated 5/4/00 2:37:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... a ... Excellent. Thank you. Thank you very much. Takabayashi Genpachi
              Message 6 of 25 , May 4, 2000
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                In a message dated 5/4/00 2:37:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                ajbryant@... writes:

                > When I get back from Japan, remind me and I'll send you some photos. I have
                a
                > couple, but plan on taking a few more.
                >
                > Effingham
                >
                Excellent. Thank you. Thank you very much.

                Takabayashi Genpachi
              • Joshua Badgley
                ... Okay, I ve been looking through my own pictures, but it doesn t help that I m not sure what I m looking for. As usual when I just ask someone what s a
                Message 7 of 25 , May 8, 2000
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                  On Mon, 1 May 2000, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

                  > Now, on the other hand, you can build a *real* small shrine (typically about the
                  > size of a portable TV) in the garden; there are several different styles of
                  > yashira you can use, depending on how talented/ambitious you are, and how much
                  > you want to blow on decoration. You don't need a torii per se (you can use a
                  > knotted rope with streamers instead). If you want to make the standing yashira,
                  > a torii just wide enough to admit you and just tall enough that you don't have
                  > to stoop leading to a six foot path in front of it wouldn't be too odd.

                  Okay, I've been looking through my own pictures, but it doesn't help that
                  I'm not sure what I'm looking for. As usual when I just ask someone
                  'what's a yashira?' they look at me for a second and then proceed to ask
                  if I meant 'yashiro' or 'kashira' or some other word. So I'm asking you,
                  what is a yashira, more precisely?

                  If it is those stone lanterns and whatnot, I've plenty of pictures of
                  those. Regardless, here are the links to what pictures I have of Japanese
                  gardens. Unfortunately, the pictures are a tad large in most cases.


                  http://mercury.skilak.net/~logan/photos/niwa.JPG (A small garden behind a
                  private residence)

                  http://mercury.skilak.net/~logan/photos/Kenrokuen/ (My pictures from
                  Kenrokuen gardens)


                  Most of my pictures can be found at mercury.skilak.net/~logan/photos/
                  except for those that haven't been scanned in--a problem I cannot easily
                  remedy as I don't currently have any more space on that particular
                  server. I'm working on a more user-friendly tour of the site, but there
                  are more pressing matters at hand.

                  Gambarimashite!


                  -Godric Logan
                • Barbara Nostrand
                  Noble Cousin Yashiro is the kunyomi for JA in jinja. The word refers to a jinja (shrine) or more specifically to the building housing the kami. Your Humble
                  Message 8 of 25 , May 15, 2000
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                    Noble Cousin

                    Yashiro is the kunyomi for JA in jinja. The word refers to a jinja (shrine)
                    or more specifically to the building housing the kami.

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar

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                  • Barbara Nostrand
                    Noble Cousin! Japanese department stores sell ready made yashira which are customarily mounted on top of the ridge beam inside the innermost room of the
                    Message 9 of 25 , May 21, 2000
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                      Noble Cousin!

                      Japanese department stores sell ready made yashira which are customarily
                      mounted on top of the ridge beam inside the innermost room of the
                      Japanese home. They can also be found in the central work area of
                      Japanese restaurants.

                      However, if you simply wish to enshrine your back yard, you do not
                      have to have a yashira at all. You could for example simply tie
                      a rope around the trunk of a particularly magnificent tree and
                      attach paper streamers.

                      Your Humble Servant
                      Solveig Throndardottir
                      Amateur Scholar

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                      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
                      | de Moivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
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                    • Barbara Nostrand
                      Noble Cousins! If you simply want a small shrine, the archetypal Japanese shrine is simply a heian style or transitional shoen style house. The idea is that
                      Message 10 of 25 , May 21, 2000
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                        Noble Cousins!

                        If you simply want a small shrine, the archetypal Japanese shrine is
                        simply a heian style or transitional shoen style house. The idea is that
                        you are providing living quarters for the kami.

                        Your Humble Servant
                        Solveig Throndardottir
                        Amateur Scholar

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                        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
                        | de Moivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
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