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Re: [SCA-JML] Fine Period Dining

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  • Solveig
    Murasaki no Haurichiban dono! Greetings from Solveig! Japanese culinary technique is primarily concerned with the arts of cutting and arranging food. Some
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 29, 2003
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      Murasaki no Haurichiban dono!

      Greetings from Solveig! Japanese culinary technique is primarily concerned
      with the arts of cutting and arranging food. Some semi-processed ingredients
      can be purchased premade both today and prior to 1600. Basic cooking
      techniques include boiling, broiling, cold vinegared food, warm vinegared
      food, &c. As a result, you can cook most Japanese dishes over a campfire.
      Rice and soup are the primary technical challenges in this regard and
      were prepared using a kamado (if I recall the word correctly) which is a
      kind of furnace with large round holes in the top to accomodate rice pots
      and soup pots. Other iconographic evidence shows low cutting tables and
      smaller pots over open fires.
      --

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

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