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Re: [SCA-JML] Shinto Priestess?

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  • Brian Dean
    Thank you for that wonderful Resource, you have just sped up some of my reasearch Onishi Hirotaka Kageyama ...
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 27, 2003
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      Thank you for that wonderful Resource, you have just sped up some of my
      reasearch


      Onishi Hirotaka Kageyama








      >From: "Jennifer Oaks" <jennmoaks@...>
      >Reply-To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      >To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
      >Subject: [SCA-JML] Shinto Priestess?
      >Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:31:12 -0400
      >
      >
      >On the Kyoto Musuem Japanese page there are two pictures I have a question
      >about. I'm not able to email the direct link to the pictures in question,
      >so I'm posting the link to the page. The pictures are the 4th from the
      >bottom and the 11th from the bottom. Are these miko or shinto priestesses?
      >
      >http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukusyoku/wayou/index.htm
      >
      >Keiaiji no Nyudo Nyodai
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

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    • Solveig
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Number 4 from the bottom is a young upper-class boy. Item #8 in the picture is a tachi. Number 11 from the bottom is a
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 29, 2003
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig! Number 4 from the bottom is a young upper-class boy.
        Item #8 in the picture is a tachi. Number 11 from the bottom is a shirabyoushi.
        This is a picture of a maiko affecting masculine costume. This practice
        originated in the late Heian period. You can especially expect this
        sort of thing when a maiko performs a masculine dance. There is a fairly
        long list of famous shirabayoshi dancers. Originally, it was a costume
        worn while singing imayo and performing a dance. Shirabayoushi may be related
        to a particular form found in gigaku. Later, the term relates to dances
        associated with the nobility, certain buddhist monks, &c. During the
        Muromachi period this appears to have evolved into the kusemai of the Noh
        theatre and was eventually adopted by onnagata of both kyougen and kabuki.

        Ortolani discusses shirabyoushi in "The Japanese Theatre". Ortolani notes
        that Emperor Go-Komatsu dissapproved of kusemai as being dissorderly. These
        dances appear to have been associated with popular and even salacious songs
        called ko-uta. Fujiwara Moronaga (12 c.) wtrote that shirabayoushi was the
        music of a nation close to ruin. The dancers apparently pirouetted with their
        heads errect or even facing upward which is rather unusual for Japanese dances.
        The normal stance for Japanese dances is with the knees bent.

        Shizuka Gozen is a particularly well known shirabyoushi dancer. However, most
        of these dancers were social outcasts.

        Ortolani notes that early shirabyoushi dancers used a fan and were accompanied
        by a drum. Later, other musical instruments were added.

        Zeami was quite interested in kusemai which Ortolani suggests was descended
        from shirabyoushi.
        --

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

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