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Linen and somethign to talk about

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  • Kev Fitzpatrick
    Greetings all, Something to get rid of the silence... Garb questions...again. Linen. It s a natural fiber. I ve seen pictures where it looks like it might
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 27, 2000
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      Greetings all,
      Something to get rid of the silence...
      Garb questions...again.

      Linen. It's a natural fiber. I've seen pictures
      where it looks like it might have been linen and I was
      wondering as to its historical correctness in japanese
      clothing as well as to its uses.

      What sort of articles would it have been used for? and
      when used, was it lined or left umm...one-ply?

      Thanks
      yoroshiku
      Kumamoto Takezou



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    • Kass McGann
      ... [I tried to reply to this yesterday, but it timed-out on me] Kumamoto-dono, Now we re in my territory! The basic fibre used by common people in Japan is
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 28, 2000
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        --- In sca-jml@egroups.com, Kev Fitzpatrick <sarusaru_99@y...> wrote:
        > Greetings all,
        > Something to get rid of the silence...
        > Garb questions...again.
        >
        > Linen. It's a natural fiber. I've seen pictures
        > where it looks like it might have been linen and I was
        > wondering as to its historical correctness in japanese
        > clothing as well as to its uses.
        >
        > What sort of articles would it have been used for? and
        > when used, was it lined or left umm...one-ply?
        >
        > Thanks
        > yoroshiku
        > Kumamoto Takezou
        >>>>
        [I tried to reply to this yesterday, but it timed-out on me]

        Kumamoto-dono,

        Now we're in my territory!

        The basic fibre used by common people in Japan is hemp. Hemp and
        flax (the plant that produces linen fibre) are both bast fibres and
        look incredibly similar. The way they are prepared for spinning it
        similar, the texture is similar... Many people I know use linen
        instead of hemp because of the ridiculous cost of hemp fabric in the
        U.S. So if you have a good source of linen and no source of hemp,
        I'd say use it.

        Hemp was used for just about every article of clothing you can think
        of. It was the "silk" of the masses. It would have been used both
        lined and un-lined depending upon the garment.

        Aoi
      • Barbara Nostrand
        Noble Cousins! ... She is of course quite correct about linen and hemp. Hemp makes a tough and rather nice fabric. (I have seen shirts made out of the stuff in
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 30, 2000
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          Noble Cousins!

          >Now we're in my territory!
          >
          >The basic fibre used by common people in Japan is hemp. Hemp and
          >flax (the plant that produces linen fibre) are both bast fibres and
          >look incredibly similar. The way they are prepared for spinning it
          >similar, the texture is similar... Many people I know use linen
          >instead of hemp because of the ridiculous cost of hemp fabric in the
          >U.S. So if you have a good source of linen and no source of hemp,
          >I'd say use it.
          >
          >Hemp was used for just about every article of clothing you can think
          >of. It was the "silk" of the masses. It would have been used both
          >lined and un-lined depending upon the garment.

          She is of course quite correct about linen and hemp. Hemp makes a
          tough and rather nice fabric. (I have seen shirts made out of the
          stuff in Japan.) Cotton was a luxury fabric until comparatively
          recently. Silk should not be avoided. It all depends on what you
          are trying to make and for what purpose.

          As I recall; flax, hemp and jute are all sort of associated with
          each other in East Asia. Essentially, they are all produced by
          separating the fibres of reeds. Silk is unwound from cocoons and
          cotton is produced by separating fibres from seeds. Finally, wool
          is just hair. In the United States, you will find flax (linen) a
          lot more easily than either hemp or jute. Unfortunately, pure
          linen is now becoming rather scarce. Canada has been investigating
          commercial production of hemp fibre, but I don't recall seeing a
          lot of it anywhere yet.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

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        • Barbara Nostrand
          Noble Cousin! Yes, both flax and hemp were known and used in medieval Japan. Your Humble Servant Solveig Throndardottir Amateur Scholar
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 11, 2000
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            Noble Cousin!

            Yes, both flax and hemp were known and used in medieval Japan.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

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