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Re: A question

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  • Barbara Nostrand
    Noble Cousins! I was told by her master that I inadvertently insulted her blueness on this forum. That was not my intent. As I explained in my note to her
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 11 1:47 PM
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      Noble Cousins!

      I was told by her master that I inadvertently insulted her blueness
      on this forum. That was not my intent. As I explained in my note to
      her master (attached belowy) I was attempting to address her in my
      rather ignorant attempt at Heian period Japanese of some sort. My
      intention was not to insult her either publically or privately. This
      note is probably poorly conceived as well. I am currently exhausted
      and rather depressed. That is of course no excuse, but it is the
      truth. Regardless, everyone knows that pond scum exercises moral
      superiority to me. I wish that I could recall how to write "abandon
      all hope ye who enter" in early modern Italian. That would be an
      appropriate quote at the moment. Regardless, I do hope that her
      blueness can find it in her heart to both forgive me and understand
      that I was not intending to insult her.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solvieg Throndardottir
      Barbarous Trash


      >Lady Solveig,
      >
      >>Toshi Dono!
      >>
      >>Aho is a slang word in modern Kansai Ben which means "fool". However,
      >>your apprentice is a lady of the Heian court. According to Roy Andrew
      >>Miller, classical Japanese did not permit adjacent vowels (if I
      >>recall his book correctly at least). Consequently, in classical
      >>Japanese, they substituted the H column for medial vowels which
      >>were preceeded by vowels. Essentially, I was trying to address her in
      >>a classical version of her name. I'm sorry to hear that while she
      >>is familiar with modern Kansai ben, that she is not familiar with
      >>this peculiarity of classical Kansai Japanese.
      >
      >I believe she did ASK you if you were calling her a fool, to which you
      >did not respond. Hence, the assumption. You should be more careful
      >in your public conversations, and respond to such queries rapidly.
      >
      >
      >>Please assure her,
      >>that had I intended to insult her, I would have done so much more
      >>delicately. I suppose that I should look up "blue" in my Kogojiten.
      >>I may easily have made a mistake about the classical form. However,
      >>what was intended was an attempt at addressing her in a more archaic
      >>and hopefully more appropriate form. Please forward this note to her.
      >>Absolutely no offence was intended.
      >
      >If you would explain this to her YOURSELF, it would be considerably
      >more honorable for you.
      >
      >>You may of course choose to take
      >>offence if you deem it appropriate. I sincerely hope that you do not.
      >
      >So far, I have not been positively impressed by your choices and
      >responses in this matter. I sincerely hope that amends can be made.
      >
      >toshi
      >
      >>
      >> Your Humble Servant
      >> Solveig Throndardottir
      >> Amateur Scholar
      >>
      >> >Greetings to Lady Solveig,
      >> >
      >> >I hope you are well on this lovely spring evening.
      >> >
      >> >It is my understanding that you are on a Japanese mailing list, and
      >> >have been corresponding with my apprentice, Fujiwara no Aoi-hime.
      >> >This is, in and of itself, not particularly noteworthy. However, she
      >> >mentioned in passing that you appear to have insulted her in public
      >> >by addressing her as "Ahohime" (fool). When I pressed her on it, she
      >> >admitted that it occurred not once, but three times; and when she
      >> >asked you about it directly, you apparently did not explain or
      >> >apologize.
      >> >
      >> >Can you explain to *me* why, as her Master, I should not take
      >>offense at this?
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >toshi
      >>
      >>
      >>+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
      >>| Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
      >>| de Moivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
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      +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
      | de Moivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
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    • LT
      Greetings, I m looking for the correct term for the wooden contraption that the Japanese kept their prisoners in. It was a block of wood that had a hold for
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 7 11:32 AM
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        Greetings,

        I'm looking for the correct term for the wooden contraption that the
        Japanese kept their prisoners in. It was a block of wood that had a
        hold for their neck, and two holes for their wrists so that their
        hands were in front of their face. Were those called also called
        stocks or was there another term for it. Also is this period?

        my thanks.

        -Affrika
      • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
        ... Well, the Japanese certainly didn t call them stocks , but I think that the term is appropriate. Not sure what the correct Japanese name is for it. -Ii
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 7 7:40 PM
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          On 4/7/06, LT <latanya.taylor@...> wrote:
          > Greetings,
          >
          > I'm looking for the correct term for the wooden contraption that the
          > Japanese kept their prisoners in. It was a block of wood that had a
          > hold for their neck, and two holes for their wrists so that their
          > hands were in front of their face. Were those called also called
          > stocks or was there another term for it. Also is this period?
          >
          Well, the Japanese certainly didn't call them 'stocks', but I think
          that the term is appropriate. Not sure what the correct Japanese name
          is for it.

          -Ii
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