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Re: [SCA-JML] fourth, fifth and sixth tries at a name

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... You re getting farther and farther away. Japanese did not as a rule *use* adjectivals. Very rarely as a nickname, but not anywhere like we do ( Richard THE
    Message 1 of 39 , Aug 2, 2003
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      John wrote:

      > but as you pointed out, i need a numerical listing or zokumyou, so i
      > came up with two possibilities:
      > Odawara no isamashiki kinjiro takako
      >

      You're getting farther and farther away.

      Japanese did not as a rule *use* adjectivals. Very rarely as a nickname, but not anywhere like we do ("Richard THE
      LIONHEARTED" "Charles THE FAT" etc. "Harold HARDRAADA"). Then there's the issue of place names.

      You have the makings of a decent name here *if* you drop the "no" (just make Odawara a surname) and drop the
      "isamashiki" (oh, and change Takako to Takahiko).

      Odawara Kinjiro Takahiko is a perfectly good name.

      >
      > excited gold(en) second son filial son of Odawara
      >
      > OR better yet i think , drop the descriptive "isamashiki"
      >
      > Odawara no kinjiro takako
      >

      BINGO! Much better. We're getting there.

      >
      > but the translation seems clumsy to me
      > Golden second son filial son of Odawara
      >

      The solution is easy. Stop translating names. That will mess you up. Names are names, following special rules;
      they're not regular words. When you talk to a girl name "Rose" do you think of her as "Rose" or "*a* rose"?


      >
      > I may need a new nanori
      >
      > How about Takamori
      > "filial guard"
      >

      Actually, the meaning of "takamori" is "protecting/guarding filiality."

      >
      > Odawara no Kinjiro Takamori
      >
      > Golden second son filial guard of Odawara
      >
      > this meets the family name_zokumyou_nanori format, and I like the
      > sound of it.
      >
      > thoughts?

      But it lacks the surname. Anyone who has a zokumyo *and* a nanori will have a surname.

      Drop the "no" and you have a good name.

      Effingham
    • James Eckman
      ... Yes, they have puns. I think you can find at least one homonym on every page of a Japanese dictionary and I ve seen at least one TV series that the
      Message 39 of 39 , Aug 4, 2003
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        >
        >
        > From: "Sean Malloy" <srmalloy@...>
        >
        >
        >Isn't there a subtype of Japanese humor that exploits the wealth of
        >homophones by replacing characters in a word or name so that it
        >_sounds_ the same but the changed characters mean something
        >completely different?
        >
        >

        Yes, they have puns. I think you can find at least one homonym on every
        page of a Japanese dictionary and I've seen at least one TV series that
        the protaganist has to rip out several bad explanations based on them.
        For example, the word fling and wind chime sound alike, imagine that in
        a comedy setting. I've also seen characters substituted for 'cute'
        effects in ads. Enough said :) Anthony can tell us about ancient usage,
        oops he already did!

        Jim
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