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Re: [SCA-JML] first try at a name

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  • Ii Saburou
    ... The tetsu-tora doesn t sound like any name I have ever heard in Japanese, unfortunately Odawara no Ichiro sounds fine, but a lower class name, it seems.
    Message 1 of 39 , Aug 1, 2003
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      On Fri, 1 Aug 2003, John wrote:

      > here goes nothing.
      >
      > odawara no tetsu-tora ichiro
      >
      > literally (i hope) :
      > first son iron tiger of odawara

      The 'tetsu-tora' doesn't sound like any name I have ever heard in
      Japanese, unfortunately

      Odawara no Ichiro sounds fine, but a lower class name, it seems.

      If by 'Tetsutora' you are looking for the nanori, or famous name (e.g.
      Ieyasu, Nobunaga, etc.) it needs to be the last of the three, and I'm not
      sure I've seen that concept put together before for a nanori. You do have
      the syllabic structure correct, however, as well as the use of two kanji
      pronounced with kun-yomi readings, which seems to be the norm.

      I'll let others throw their 2 yen into the pot--I've got more Pennsic
      Packing to do!

      -Ii

      PS: I'll be down with Tengusanji at Willow Point if anyone is looking for
      me.
    • James Eckman
      ... Yes, they have puns. I think you can find at least one homonym on every page of a Japanese dictionary and I ve seen at least one TV series that the
      Message 39 of 39 , Aug 4, 2003
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        >
        >
        > From: "Sean Malloy" <srmalloy@...>
        >
        >
        >Isn't there a subtype of Japanese humor that exploits the wealth of
        >homophones by replacing characters in a word or name so that it
        >_sounds_ the same but the changed characters mean something
        >completely different?
        >
        >

        Yes, they have puns. I think you can find at least one homonym on every
        page of a Japanese dictionary and I've seen at least one TV series that
        the protaganist has to rip out several bad explanations based on them.
        For example, the word fling and wind chime sound alike, imagine that in
        a comedy setting. I've also seen characters substituted for 'cute'
        effects in ads. Enough said :) Anthony can tell us about ancient usage,
        oops he already did!

        Jim
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