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Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

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  • RedfieldRH@aol.com
    Interesting discussion! I have always kept the blade on the left as I like to see exactly where it is cutting. I can switch hands and pull with either hand.
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 1, 2013
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      Interesting discussion! I have always kept the blade on the left as I like to see exactly where it is cutting. I can switch hands and pull with either hand.

      Actually, it would be really interesting to poll members for how many of the amazing operations pictured in the book about the Sawsmith have actually been done. I have not tried ripping with mine for example. Vertical pin routing intrigues me.

      I did build the complete bench system shown in the book including the notched 2x4 joints. Love that book.

      Rick



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Greg Gaal <greggaal@...>
      To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thu, Dec 27, 2012 2:55 pm
      Subject: RE: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

       

      I have alternated sides depending on the need for angled cuts. Moving the
      blade often makes better use of the back fence against the project when
      flipping the project over does not do the trick.

      Additionally, it may be more convenient to rip in one direction than the
      other, forcing a blade change to the other side.

      Thanks,

      Greg

      -----Original Message-----
      From: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of donrieg@...
      Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2012 3:32 PM
      To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

      I am right-handed so exercise better control using the right hand on the
      saw. Also was taught in high school shop over 60 years ago that keeping the
      body out of the plane of the saw tends to reduce the damage associated with
      leaning into it. Never considered using left hand position for the blade.

      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links

    • Matthew Tritt
      I m with you, Rick. As a matter of fact, the SawSmith came from the factory with the rubber cap on the right-hand arbor, and the operator s manual shows the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 2, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm with you, Rick. As a matter of fact, the SawSmith came from the factory with the rubber cap on the right-hand arbor, and the operator's manual shows the blade mounted on the left. Using the blade on the right feels extremely awkward to me, the only exception being for ripping operations, which makes using the right side mandatory.

        The ripping question has been hashed over many times on this forum, but for those of us who are new here, using the saw for ripping is a potentially very dangerous operation for several reasons. It's also clearly not as accurate as the average table saw for the obvious reason that there are no index marks possible on the table and stock width is very limited. One really scary thing about ripping with these saws, and I've done it several times, is that the blade is pretty much exposed over most of it's entire rotation, making all kinds of hand altering mistakes possible - and even probable. Remember that the only anti kick-back mechanism available for an overhead saw like the SawSmith is the woefully inadequate guard-mounted arm and cam, which works pretty well in cross cut application. If all wood were free of knots and tight figuring, not having a positive anti kick-back device wouldn't be such a big deal - but that isn't the way things are in reality.

        In my shop I have two (don't ask) ShopSmiths with all the attachments, the SawSmith, an all iron Boice-Crane tablesaw from the second world war (an excellent saw!) and a big table mounted drill press. The ShopSmith's table saws are fine for working small stock, but lousy for big stuff, and the change-over is slow and requires extensive resetting of jigs and fixtures. The antique Boice-Crane cuts through hardwoods like butter and will handle full sheets of plywood, even if the operator can't. :) Even with a full shop, you never have enough!
        Matt



        From: "RedfieldRH@..." <RedfieldRH@...>
        To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, January 1, 2013 4:20:15 PM
        Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

         

        Interesting discussion! I have always kept the blade on the left as I like to see exactly where it is cutting. I can switch hands and pull with either hand.

        Actually, it would be really interesting to poll members for how many of the amazing operations pictured in the book about the Sawsmith have actually been done. I have not tried ripping with mine for example. Vertical pin routing intrigues me.

        I did build the complete bench system shown in the book including the notched 2x4 joints. Love that book.

        Rick




        -----Original Message-----
        From: Greg Gaal <greggaal@...>
        To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thu, Dec 27, 2012 2:55 pm
        Subject: RE: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

         

        I have alternated sides depending on the need for angled cuts. Moving the
        blade often makes better use of the back fence against the project when
        flipping the project over does not do the trick.

        Additionally, it may be more convenient to rip in one direction than the
        other, forcing a blade change to the other side.

        Thanks,

        Greg

        -----Original Message-----
        From: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of donrieg@...
        Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2012 3:32 PM
        To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

        I am right-handed so exercise better control using the right hand on the
        saw. Also was taught in high school shop over 60 years ago that keeping the
        body out of the plane of the saw tends to reduce the damage associated with
        leaning into it. Never considered using left hand position for the blade.

        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links

      • RedfieldRH@aol.com
        Great info! I love the old classic and massive tools. I am into metal working as well and prize my Sheldon lathe I think the bottom line is the value of RAS
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 2, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Great info! I love the old classic and massive tools. I am into metal working as well and prize my Sheldon lathe

          I think the bottom line is the value of RAS are that they can fill a nice niche for dedicated woodworkers. Everytime I go to the lumber yard and see the 20 ft bench with the heavy duty RAS I am reminded of their continuing value. The key is those who know their strengths and limitations.

          By the way, I thought I would share a little success story in woodworking. For years I have hoped to resaw chunks of firewood and make gifts. This Christmas I succeeded in making boxes for everyone. Here are some sample pictures.

          Rick



          -----Original Message-----
          From: Matthew Tritt <windgooroo1@...>
          To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wed, Jan 2, 2013 11:31 am
          Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

           
          I'm with you, Rick. As a matter of fact, the SawSmith came from the factory with the rubber cap on the right-hand arbor, and the operator's manual shows the blade mounted on the left. Using the blade on the right feels extremely awkward to me, the only exception being for ripping operations, which makes using the right side mandatory.

          The ripping question has been hashed over many times on this forum, but for those of us who are new here, using the saw for ripping is a potentially very dangerous operation for several reasons. It's also clearly not as accurate as the average table saw for the obvious reason that there are no index marks possible on the table and stock width is very limited. One really scary thing about ripping with these saws, and I've done it several times, is that the blade is pretty much exposed over most of it's entire rotation, making all kinds of hand altering mistakes possible - and even probable. Remember that the only anti kick-back mechanism available for an overhead saw like the SawSmith is the woefully inadequate guard-mounted arm and cam, which works pretty well in cross cut application. If all wood were free of knots and tight figuring, not having a positive anti kick-back device wouldn't be such a big deal - but that isn't the way things are in reality.

          In my shop I have two (don't ask) ShopSmiths with all the attachments, the SawSmith, an all iron Boice-Crane tablesaw from the second world war (an excellent saw!) and a big table mounted drill press. The ShopSmith's table saws are fine for working small stock, but lousy for big stuff, and the change-over is slow and requires extensive resetting of jigs and fixtures. The antique Boice-Crane cuts through hardwoods like butter and will handle full sheets of plywood, even if the operator can't. :) Even with a full shop, you never have enough!
          Matt



          From: "RedfieldRH@..." <RedfieldRH@...>
          To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, January 1, 2013 4:20:15 PM
          Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

           
          Interesting discussion! I have always kept the blade on the left as I like to see exactly where it is cutting. I can switch hands and pull with either hand.

          Actually, it would be really interesting to poll members for how many of the amazing operations pictured in the book about the Sawsmith have actually been done. I have not tried ripping with mine for example. Vertical pin routing intrigues me.

          I did build the complete bench system shown in the book including the notched 2x4 joints. Love that book.

          Rick



          -----Original Message-----
          From: Greg Gaal <greggaal@...>
          To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thu, Dec 27, 2012 2:55 pm
          Subject: RE: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

           

          I have alternated sides depending on the need for angled cuts. Moving the
          blade often makes better use of the back fence against the project when
          flipping the project over does not do the trick.

          Additionally, it may be more convenient to rip in one direction than the
          other, forcing a blade change to the other side.

          Thanks,

          Greg

          -----Original Message-----
          From: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of donrieg@...
          Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2012 3:32 PM
          To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

          I am right-handed so exercise better control using the right hand on the
          saw. Also was taught in high school shop over 60 years ago that keeping the
          body out of the plane of the saw tends to reduce the damage associated with
          leaning into it. Never considered using left hand position for the blade.

          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

        • Matthew Tritt
          Really nice firewood! Good work, Rick. Matt ________________________________ From: RedfieldRH@aol.com To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com Sent:
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 2, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Really nice firewood! Good work, Rick.
            Matt



            From: "RedfieldRH@..." <RedfieldRH@...>
            To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, January 2, 2013 4:29:04 PM
            Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

             

            Great info! I love the old classic and massive tools. I am into metal working as well and prize my Sheldon lathe

            I think the bottom line is the value of RAS are that they can fill a nice niche for dedicated woodworkers. Everytime I go to the lumber yard and see the 20 ft bench with the heavy duty RAS I am reminded of their continuing value. The key is those who know their strengths and limitations.

            By the way, I thought I would share a little success story in woodworking. For years I have hoped to resaw chunks of firewood and make gifts. This Christmas I succeeded in making boxes for everyone. Here are some sample pictures.


            Rick




            -----Original Message-----
            From: Matthew Tritt <windgooroo1@...>
            To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wed, Jan 2, 2013 11:31 am
            Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

             
            I'm with you, Rick. As a matter of fact, the SawSmith came from the factory with the rubber cap on the right-hand arbor, and the operator's manual shows the blade mounted on the left. Using the blade on the right feels extremely awkward to me, the only exception being for ripping operations, which makes using the right side mandatory.

            The ripping question has been hashed over many times on this forum, but for those of us who are new here, using the saw for ripping is a potentially very dangerous operation for several reasons. It's also clearly not as accurate as the average table saw for the obvious reason that there are no index marks possible on the table and stock width is very limited. One really scary thing about ripping with these saws, and I've done it several times, is that the blade is pretty much exposed over most of it's entire rotation, making all kinds of hand altering mistakes possible - and even probable. Remember that the only anti kick-back mechanism available for an overhead saw like the SawSmith is the woefully inadequate guard-mounted arm and cam, which works pretty well in cross cut application. If all wood were free of knots and tight figuring, not having a positive anti kick-back device wouldn't be such a big deal - but that isn't the way things are in reality.

            In my shop I have two (don't ask) ShopSmiths with all the attachments, the SawSmith, an all iron Boice-Crane tablesaw from the second world war (an excellent saw!) and a big table mounted drill press. The ShopSmith's table saws are fine for working small stock, but lousy for big stuff, and the change-over is slow and requires extensive resetting of jigs and fixtures. The antique Boice-Crane cuts through hardwoods like butter and will handle full sheets of plywood, even if the operator can't. :) Even with a full shop, you never have enough!
            Matt



            From: "RedfieldRH@..." <RedfieldRH@...>
            To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, January 1, 2013 4:20:15 PM
            Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

             
            Interesting discussion! I have always kept the blade on the left as I like to see exactly where it is cutting. I can switch hands and pull with either hand.

            Actually, it would be really interesting to poll members for how many of the amazing operations pictured in the book about the Sawsmith have actually been done. I have not tried ripping with mine for example. Vertical pin routing intrigues me.

            I did build the complete bench system shown in the book including the notched 2x4 joints. Love that book.

            Rick



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Greg Gaal <greggaal@...>
            To: sawsmith <sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thu, Dec 27, 2012 2:55 pm
            Subject: RE: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

             

            I have alternated sides depending on the need for angled cuts. Moving the
            blade often makes better use of the back fence against the project when
            flipping the project over does not do the trick.

            Additionally, it may be more convenient to rip in one direction than the
            other, forcing a blade change to the other side.

            Thanks,

            Greg

            -----Original Message-----
            From: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of donrieg@...
            Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2012 3:32 PM
            To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: RAS on Ebay

            I am right-handed so exercise better control using the right hand on the
            saw. Also was taught in high school shop over 60 years ago that keeping the
            body out of the plane of the saw tends to reduce the damage associated with
            leaning into it. Never considered using left hand position for the blade.

            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

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