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Repair (replacement) of the Coiled Power Cord

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  • Carl Finch
    I ve just finished replacing the coiled power cord that runs from the on-off switch to the motor carriage of my Sawsmith. The symptom: everything working fine
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 29, 2005
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      I've just finished replacing the coiled power cord that runs from the
      on-off switch to the motor carriage of my Sawsmith.

      The symptom: everything working fine one minute, but next cut, nothin'--no
      power, no hum.

      Peering up under the arm, the coiled cord looked OK (the break had occurred
      where the cord drops down into the top of the carriage).

      Moving the carriage in and out to various points and re-trying the power
      switch, occasionally resulted in a 'pop,' and bypassing the power cords
      and switch showed the motor-relay-capacitor were OK--whew! An ohmmeter
      verified the coiled cord was the problem--no continuity on one of the wires.

      I bought the Grainger power cord suggested by Bill Leslie and Jacob a year
      ago. It's number is 3AY41 and it now sells for $9.41US. The cord is 16
      gauge, 2-conductor. (And it is long enough to repair two Sawsmiths.)

      The repair is not overly complex, but is just a bit awkward to get at,
      especially for these bifocal-assisted eyes of mine--trying to look up and
      work under the saw arm.

      I suggest noting with care the number of turns in the old cord as well as
      the amount of uncoiled cord (pig tails) at each end--i.e., make the
      replacement as close to the original as possible. After much unsuccessful
      bending, attempting to straighten several inches of the coiled cord, I
      finally used a heat gun to do the job.

      The procedure is explained in "Service Bulletin Page 7 of 21"

      It is necessary to remove the cable clamps of both the coiled cord and the
      straight cord, in order to get at the on-off switch. I found that careful
      reassembly was necessary to prevent the carriage from rubbing on the
      cords--I should have more carefully noted the positions of those cable
      clamps before removing them.

      The new coiled cord is much more flexible than the old one (after 40 years
      it had become very stiff), and so the carriage now moves in and out much
      more freely.

      --Carl
      in Medford, Oregon
    • Patrick Smart
      First off, I want to thank all of you who have posted on this subject. I inherited a Sawsmith from my father just prior to his passing years ago and I have
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 5, 2007
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        First off, I want to thank all of you who have posted on this
        subject. I inherited a Sawsmith from my father just prior to his
        passing years ago and I have relied on it's dependability since I
        used it at home as a kid. A short while back I experienced the
        inevitable power failure as the coiled wire shorted out just as I
        finished a cut (Just beginning the cutting for installing a hardwood
        floor.) It broke in the same way, just where it drops down through
        the carriage to the motor. Through the information in this forum I
        have been able to replace the wire and just started the saw up for
        the first time in months. During the repair I tried and found to
        work a couple of things along the way:

        1. I took off the rear nut of the locking bar within the top arm and
        removed the rod, making it very simple to reinstall the coiled wire.
        If you don't move the front locking nut it just goes right back into
        place.
        2. Having dealt with Grainger A LOT in private industry and found
        them to be less than helpful and cooperative, even with a tax #, I
        ordered the same wire through a website called DrillSpot
        www.drillspot.com , for only a few dollars more. Wouldn't you know
        it arrived the next day in a Grainger box! Even with standard
        shipping. [Product Name: Coiled Power Supply Cord, Product Id:
        315799]
        3. A digital camera works great for before & during pictures to help
        with reinstallation.

        Thanks again to all of you who post.

        Patrick Smart
        Seabrook, NH


        --- In sawsmith@yahoogroups.com, Carl Finch <carlfinch@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've just finished replacing the coiled power cord that runs from
        the
        > on-off switch to the motor carriage of my Sawsmith.
        >
        > The symptom: everything working fine one minute, but next cut,
        nothin'--no
        > power, no hum.
        >
        > Peering up under the arm, the coiled cord looked OK (the break had
        occurred
        > where the cord drops down into the top of the carriage).
        >
        > Moving the carriage in and out to various points and re-trying the
        power
        > switch, occasionally resulted in a 'pop,' and bypassing the power
        cords
        > and switch showed the motor-relay-capacitor were OK--whew! An
        ohmmeter
        > verified the coiled cord was the problem--no continuity on one of
        the wires.
        >
        > I bought the Grainger power cord suggested by Bill Leslie and Jacob
        a year
        > ago. It's number is 3AY41 and it now sells for $9.41US. The cord
        is 16
        > gauge, 2-conductor. (And it is long enough to repair two
        Sawsmiths.)
        >
        > The repair is not overly complex, but is just a bit awkward to get
        at,
        > especially for these bifocal-assisted eyes of mine--trying to look
        up and
        > work under the saw arm.
        >
        > I suggest noting with care the number of turns in the old cord as
        well as
        > the amount of uncoiled cord (pig tails) at each end--i.e., make the
        > replacement as close to the original as possible. After much
        unsuccessful
        > bending, attempting to straighten several inches of the coiled
        cord, I
        > finally used a heat gun to do the job.
        >
        > The procedure is explained in "Service Bulletin Page 7 of 21"
        >
        > It is necessary to remove the cable clamps of both the coiled cord
        and the
        > straight cord, in order to get at the on-off switch. I found that
        careful
        > reassembly was necessary to prevent the carriage from rubbing on
        the
        > cords--I should have more carefully noted the positions of those
        cable
        > clamps before removing them.
        >
        > The new coiled cord is much more flexible than the old one (after
        40 years
        > it had become very stiff), and so the carriage now moves in and out
        much
        > more freely.
        >
        > --Carl
        > in Medford, Oregon
        >
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