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Re: [sawsmith] Re: SawSmith Radial Arm Saw Going On Ebay

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  • Jacob Anderson
    Jim - since you might have only got $100 or so for it, it is worth keeping even for only the most occasional use. And keep the kids away from it! Jacob ...
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 7, 2005
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      Jim - since you might have only got $100 or so for it, it is worth keeping even for only the most occasional use. And keep the kids away from it! Jacob
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: jimmynjack<mailto:jleight@...>

      I'm feeling much better that I kept it. I figure I sold my #0328
      Cosworth Vega when I got married, Sold my 68RS Camaro when I bought
      the house, I'm not selling my saw now that I have kids! My wife will
      have to deal. ;-)




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carl Finch
      ... Bzzzzt! I have no experience with routers, but an RAS generally considered to be quite a bit more dangerous than a table saw. The danger is in
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 7, 2005
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        At 10:00 AM 3/7/2005, jimmynjack wrote:

        >I guess my biggest fear was seeing some
        >of my dad's freinds missing a finger or bad scars from a Radial Arm
        >saws years ago and it gave me a early bad taste for them. I guess if
        >all the gaurds are in place and work like you supposed to, It's not
        >more dangerous than a router or table saw.

        Bzzzzt! I have no experience with routers, but an RAS generally considered
        to be quite a bit more dangerous than a table saw. The danger is in
        ripping--kickback. It's harder to avoid the path of a flying, kicked-back
        piece, ones view is somewhat blocked by the motor and carriage, and there
        are more possibilities for out-of-adjustments increasing the chance of kick
        backs.

        The anti-kickback "guard" is simply multi-fingered thingie that is tricky
        to adjust correctly and not too effective anyway. And the floating blade
        guard (that you'll find on modern saws) is.........nonexistent!

        But then again, it's a great saw--I wouldn't part with mine for nuthin'! I
        bought it new 40 years ago and though I'm not a regular woodworker, feel
        it's paid for itself many times over.

        >I'll make sure when I download the manual
        >to look through it and have all what I supposed to
        >to be safe.

        It's not too likely you'll saw off your thumb on a cross-cut, but DO learn
        about the various ways to avoid kickback when ripping.

        --Carl
        in Medford, Oregon
      • Jacob Anderson
        Carl - On the sides of our blade guard there are two mounting points and I think we can make our own floating blade guards. I envision a plexiglass (Lexan,
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 8, 2005
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          Carl - On the sides of our blade guard there are two mounting points and I think we can make our own floating blade guards.

          I envision a plexiglass (Lexan, whatever) semicircle for each side. It would have a routed, curved slot to allow it to move over the back bolt. The front bolt would serve as the pivot point. There would be one for each side of the guard.

          The hardest part would be getting the curvature of the slot right. I would start by making a cardboard test piece/template and once the kinks are worked out, fabricating one shouldn't be too hard. The edges which slide across the wood would need to be rounded and sanded so they wouldn't scratch it.

          The inside guard would have to be modified slightly so it wouldn't hit the spindle housing.

          Has anyone tried this or seen one? I definitely think it is do-able

          Jacob
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Carl Finch<mailto:carlfinch@...>
          To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com> ; sawsmith@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sawsmith@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, March 07, 2005 4:51 PM
          Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: SawSmith Radial Arm Saw Going On Ebay


          And the floating blade
          guard (that you'll find on modern saws) is.........nonexistent!

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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ronald E. Roberts
          Jacob, I ve been thinking the same thing. It should be easy to do once you figure out the curve. Geometry was a long time ago for me but I m thinking it
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 10, 2005
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            Jacob,

            I've been thinking the same thing. It should be easy to do once you figure
            out the curve. Geometry was a long time ago for me but I'm thinking it
            wouldn't be a perfect circle, would it?

            Ron Roberts
            Tucson, Arizona

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Jacob Anderson [mailto:jacobvb1@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, March 08, 2005 6:17 AM
            To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: SawSmith Radial Arm Saw Going On Ebay


            Carl - On the sides of our blade guard there are two mounting points and I
            think we can make our own floating blade guards.

            I envision a plexiglass (Lexan, whatever) semicircle for each side. It would
            have a routed, curved slot to allow it to move over the back bolt. The front
            bolt would serve as the pivot point. There would be one for each side of the
            guard.

            The hardest part would be getting the curvature of the slot right. I would
            start by making a cardboard test piece/template and once the kinks are
            worked out, fabricating one shouldn't be too hard. The edges which slide
            across the wood would need to be rounded and sanded so they wouldn't scratch
            it.

            The inside guard would have to be modified slightly so it wouldn't hit the
            spindle housing.

            Has anyone tried this or seen one? I definitely think it is do-able

            Jacob
          • Ronald E. Roberts
            That s wise advice for any power tool. But used properly I don t think RAS s are anymore dangerous than any other power saw. Accidents happen when someone is
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 10, 2005
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              That's wise advice for any power tool. But used properly I don't think
              RAS's are anymore dangerous than any other power saw. Accidents happen when
              someone is careless or not using the tool properly or without the proper
              precautions.

              Fine Woodworking had an article on radial arm saws in their August 2002
              issue by William Duckworth. He also wrote a sidebar in the same issue
              highlighting some of the best uses for a RAS. If you can't find that issue
              you can purchase the articles at FWW's website.

              I think a RAS is great for cross cutting, dado's, etc. but not good for
              ripping. The latter is where I've heard about most accidents.

              BTW, I went looking for that John Eakes book and could only find two copies
              on line and one of them turned out to already have been sold. Hopefully
              I'll see the other arrive in a few days. But you can buy the book in PDF
              format at Eakes' website for about $15. That seems reasonable.

              And finally, some of you may remember that I had to put mine back together
              after I got it. The previous owner had removed the motor from the arm in an
              effort to make it lighter. Every time I planned to go and put it back
              together I got caught up with something else. I did finally get it back on
              the arm (what a job that was!). I probably made it harder than it was due
              to my lack of experience with this. That left the switch to connect and I
              got a digital photo from the previous owner showing how it connects. Hope
              springs eternal that I can finally get to that this weekend. But I'm not
              holding my breath. :)

              Ron Roberts
              Tucson, Arizona


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Jacob Anderson [mailto:jacobvb1@...]
              Sent: Monday, March 07, 2005 11:20 AM
              To: sawsmith@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [sawsmith] Re: SawSmith Radial Arm Saw Going On Ebay


              Jim - since you might have only got $100 or so for it, it is worth keeping
              even for only the most occasional use. And keep the kids away from it! Jacob
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: jimmynjack<mailto:jleight@...>

              I'm feeling much better that I kept it. I figure I sold my #0328
              Cosworth Vega when I got married, Sold my 68RS Camaro when I bought
              the house, I'm not selling my saw now that I have kids! My wife will
              have to deal. ;-)




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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            • Jacob Anderson
              Ron - Just picturing it in my head, I do think it would be a circular arc with a radius of the distance between the two mount points. But, this curve would not
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 12, 2005
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                Ron - Just picturing it in my head, I do think it would be a circular arc with a radius of the distance between the two mount points. But, this curve would not be parallel to the outer curve of the plexiglass. At least that's how it looks in my head!

                Jacob
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Ronald E. Roberts<mailto:rroberts@...>
                Geometry was a long time ago for me but I'm thinking it
                wouldn't be a perfect circle, would it?

                Ron Roberts
                Tucson, Arizona

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • rroberts@email.arizona.edu
                Jacob, I think you are right as when it is completely down it would pretty much match the curve of the blade. I found a copy of that Jon Eakes book and two of
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 12, 2005
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                  Jacob,

                  I think you are right as when it is completely down it would pretty much match
                  the curve of the blade. I found a copy of that Jon Eakes book and two of the
                  saws on the cover have these and that is the way they look.

                  Let us know if you get anywhere with this.

                  Ron

                  Quoting Jacob Anderson <jacobvb1@...>:

                  > Ron - Just picturing it in my head, I do think it would be a circular
                  > arc with a radius of the distance between the two mount points. But,
                  > this curve would not be parallel to the outer curve of the
                  > plexiglass. At least that's how it looks in my head!
                  >
                  > Jacob
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Ronald E. Roberts<mailto:rroberts@...>
                  > Geometry was a long time ago for me but I'm thinking it
                  > wouldn't be a perfect circle, would it?
                  >
                  > Ron Roberts
                  > Tucson, Arizona
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
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