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  • celzam
    Hello! What is the meaning of this long silence? If Rushdie is to be worshipped - or (unspeakable of thoughts) not worshipped - it can not be done by silence!
    Message 1 of 128 , Oct 5, 2001
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      Hello! What is the meaning of this long silence?
      If Rushdie is to be worshipped - or (unspeakable of
      thoughts) not worshipped - it can not be done by silence!
      Anyway.<br><br>In my humble opinion Rushdie is the greatest writer
      alive. His writing is music, it exhalts, it bounces,
      boom boom boom it goes tumbling and jumbling up the
      great confused junkpile chaosland of the modern world.
      He takes all things into himself and spits them out,
      transcendant, like gasping rainbow-colured fish, onto the
      floor. I like him. He stands in the same league as
      Shakespeare, for, like him, he stretcheth and breaketh the
      boundaries of language; he writes books as big as the world.
      A topic; has anyone here read his first book,
      'Grimus'? I have not, and have never met anyone who has. If
      you have, speak, please. My personal favorite of his
      books is 'Midnight's Children'.
    • snow_beltreallydeep
      I will keep my eyes open for your suggested title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we heard that Christianity hasn t been maligned in novels, and
      Message 128 of 128 , Jan 9, 2002
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        I will keep my eyes open for your suggested
        title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we
        heard that Christianity hasn't been maligned in novels,
        and if it were, Christians would be very vocal in
        protesting such a novel.<br><br><br>Not Wanted On the Voyage
        by Timothey Findlay is quite the version of Noah's
        Ark, and although I'm not a Christian, I kept glancing
        over my shoulder, on the look out for lightening bolts
        all the time I was reading it. (It is a brilliant
        book.)<br><br>I'm reading a John Updike novel now, "Toward the End
        of Time", seemingly written around the same time as
        The Satanic Verses, although the copyright date is
        1997. Updike's main character also moves through time,
        and becomes a main character in Biblical stories.
        Updike's work has a theological approach as well, and he
        also questions accepted dogma. <br><br><br>I haven't
        finished it yet, but I wonder if anyone else in this
        discussion group has read it, and seen a similarity.
        <br><br> How does Milan Kundera react to these "profane"
        works?
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