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Grounds unlikely thematic prequel?

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  • dirkdiggler4567
    Was in the used bookstore the other day and picked up Valley of the Dolls. Complete trash, but since it probably takes the award for trashiest book ever
    Message 1 of 128 , Jan 14, 2001
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      Was in the used bookstore the other day and
      picked up Valley of the Dolls. Complete trash, but since
      it probably takes the award for "trashiest book ever
      written" I figure I'd give it a day in court as a
      milestone in PoP-Lit. Interestingly, although, not
      obviously not reaching the spiritual pinacles that Rushdie
      attempts, it's theme - the rise to PoP-Fame and it's
      resulting consequences - relates directly into some of
      Rushdie's themes of PoP in Ground... <br>Anyway, different
      topic: I think the neatest trick Rushdie does in Ground
      is, through only an attempted assasination of
      Kennedy, through Watergate being portrayed as a fictional
      film...The world that is pushing through that Ormus sees
      through his blind eye, The Other-World that threatens to
      destroy theirs, that Alternate Reality is none other than
      our reality. Pretty wild magic. As when one begins
      the novel, one takes the characters at face value,
      and the fictional space they occupy as representative
      of the same physical space we occupy, and then,
      poof, they are our alternate reality. A slick, little
      mind-binder reminiscent of the plot turn in "The Sixth
      Sense", only pulled off more gracefully and sneakily.
      Props to the Rush-Man!
    • snow_beltreallydeep
      I will keep my eyes open for your suggested title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we heard that Christianity hasn t been maligned in novels, and
      Message 128 of 128 , Jan 9, 2002
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        I will keep my eyes open for your suggested
        title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we
        heard that Christianity hasn't been maligned in novels,
        and if it were, Christians would be very vocal in
        protesting such a novel.<br><br><br>Not Wanted On the Voyage
        by Timothey Findlay is quite the version of Noah's
        Ark, and although I'm not a Christian, I kept glancing
        over my shoulder, on the look out for lightening bolts
        all the time I was reading it. (It is a brilliant
        book.)<br><br>I'm reading a John Updike novel now, "Toward the End
        of Time", seemingly written around the same time as
        The Satanic Verses, although the copyright date is
        1997. Updike's main character also moves through time,
        and becomes a main character in Biblical stories.
        Updike's work has a theological approach as well, and he
        also questions accepted dogma. <br><br><br>I haven't
        finished it yet, but I wonder if anyone else in this
        discussion group has read it, and seen a similarity.
        <br><br> How does Milan Kundera react to these "profane"
        works?
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