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Re: Rushdie Quotes

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  • liquidmice
    Rushdie Never seems to say much about his athiesm. I mean, even these quotes are rather tame. Just think of the endless insults that a mind like Rushdie s
    Message 1 of 128 , Oct 17, 2000
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      Rushdie Never seems to say much about his
      athiesm. I mean, even these quotes are rather tame. Just
      think of the endless insults that a mind like Rushdie's
      could create if he focused his attention on being
      'anti-religious.' Instead, he seems to keep rather quiet
      (outwardly) about his beliefs, and keep to the task of
      questioning traditional religious ideas, ideals, and
      practices. He performs this questioning in the arena of his
      novels, and often gets very personal in his
      search.<br><br>The 2nd quote, about Rushdie eating the Ham sandwich,
      is reflected in his novel "The Satanic Verses" when
      Rushdie writes about Gibreel Farishta loosing his faith
      and gorging himself on every pork-based product he
      can order in the Hotel restaurant. In "Midnight's
      Children", Adaam Aziz also looses his faith in one
      determining moment (when he bangs his nose on the cold
      Kashmiri ground while performing his morning prayers to
      Allah) and vows never to kiss the ground again for any
      god or man. This decision , Rushdie explains, "made a
      hole in him, a vacancy in a vital inner chamber,
      leaving him vulnerable to women and history."<br>
      <br>Well, Rushdie admittedly has a certain vulnerability to
      women (just look at his relationships/marriages) and
      writes about his loves in his novels. So let's assume
      for a moment that this is another occurrence of
      Rushdie writing himself into a character. How about the
      "hole" then? The emptiness which grows (visibly) in
      Aziz, is probably something heart-felt by Rushdie as a
      result of his Atheism. Ah, but how to fill it then? When
      true spiritual questioning/seeking occurs, the
      "traditional" rigid religions become ineffectual! Of course
      Islam can't help him now! His is an inner search, no?
      Perhaps Sufism, perhaps Buddhism, but no rigid religious
      traditions for Mr. Rushdie. I would even think that mere
      Atheism will also be unable to fill the void. Perhaps for
      now, Rushdie's writing is his 'filler?' Eh, just my 2
      1/2 cents. <br>p e a c e<br>mf<br>3~<br>.
    • snow_beltreallydeep
      I will keep my eyes open for your suggested title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we heard that Christianity hasn t been maligned in novels, and
      Message 128 of 128 , Jan 9, 2002
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        I will keep my eyes open for your suggested
        title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we
        heard that Christianity hasn't been maligned in novels,
        and if it were, Christians would be very vocal in
        protesting such a novel.<br><br><br>Not Wanted On the Voyage
        by Timothey Findlay is quite the version of Noah's
        Ark, and although I'm not a Christian, I kept glancing
        over my shoulder, on the look out for lightening bolts
        all the time I was reading it. (It is a brilliant
        book.)<br><br>I'm reading a John Updike novel now, "Toward the End
        of Time", seemingly written around the same time as
        The Satanic Verses, although the copyright date is
        1997. Updike's main character also moves through time,
        and becomes a main character in Biblical stories.
        Updike's work has a theological approach as well, and he
        also questions accepted dogma. <br><br><br>I haven't
        finished it yet, but I wonder if anyone else in this
        discussion group has read it, and seen a similarity.
        <br><br> How does Milan Kundera react to these "profane"
        works?
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