Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Rushdie Quotes

Expand Messages
  • IN_DKNY
    Hey all, I found these quotes on a religion page. I found them interesting. What do you all think? 1. To put it as simply as
    Message 1 of 128 , Oct 16 10:04 PM
      Hey all,<br>I found these quotes on a religion
      page. I found them interesting. What do you all
      think?<br><br><br><br><br><br>1. To put it as simply as possible: I am not a
      Muslim.[...] I do not accept the charge of apostacy, because I
      have never in my adult life affirmed any belief, and
      what one has not affirmed one can not be said to have
      apostasized from. The Islam I know states clearly that 'there
      can be no coercion in matters of religion'. The many
      Muslims I respect would be horrified by the idea that
      they belong to their faith purely by virtue of birth,
      and that a person who freely chose not to be a Muslim
      could therefore be put to death. [Salman Rushdie, In
      Good Faith, 1990]<br><br><br>2. God, Satan, Paradise,
      and Hell all vanished one day in my fifteenth year,
      when I quite abruptly lost my faith. [...]and
      afterwards, to prove my new-found atheism, I bought myself a
      rather tasteless ham sandwich, and so partook for the
      first time of the forbidden flesh of the swine. No
      thunderbolt arrived to strike me down. [...] From that day to
      this I have thought of myself as a wholly secular
      person. [Salman Rushdie, In God We Trust,
      1985]<br><br><br>3. I do not need the idea of God to explain the
      world I live in. [Salman Rushdie, on David Frost
      show]<br><br><br>4. I don't think there is a need for an entity like
      God in my life. [Salman Rushdie, interview with David
      Frost)]<br><br><br>5. The idea of the sacred is quite simply one of the
      most conservative notions in any culture, because it
      seeks to turn other ideas -- uncertainty, progress,
      change -- into crimes. [Salman Rushdie, Herbert Reade
      Memorial Lecture, February 6, 1990, written in hiding a
      year after Shi'ite mullahs offered a
      two-million-dollar reward for Rushdie's murder for blasphemy, from
      James A. Haught, ed., 2000 Years of Disbelief, Famous
      People with the Courage to Doubt]<br><br><br>6. To
      respect Louis Farrakhan, we must understand, is simply to
      agree with him... If dissent is now also to be thought
      of as a form of 'dissing,' then we have indeed
      succumbed to the thought police. [Salman Rushdie, to
      Reuters News Service, 4/17/96]<br><br><br>7. If I were
      asked for a one-sentence soundbite on religion, I would
      say I was against it. [Salman Rushdie, to Reuters
      News Service, 4/17/96]<br><br><br>8. Fundamentalism
      isn't about religion. It's about power
    • snow_beltreallydeep
      I will keep my eyes open for your suggested title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we heard that Christianity hasn t been maligned in novels, and
      Message 128 of 128 , Jan 9, 2002
        I will keep my eyes open for your suggested
        title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we
        heard that Christianity hasn't been maligned in novels,
        and if it were, Christians would be very vocal in
        protesting such a novel.<br><br><br>Not Wanted On the Voyage
        by Timothey Findlay is quite the version of Noah's
        Ark, and although I'm not a Christian, I kept glancing
        over my shoulder, on the look out for lightening bolts
        all the time I was reading it. (It is a brilliant
        book.)<br><br>I'm reading a John Updike novel now, "Toward the End
        of Time", seemingly written around the same time as
        The Satanic Verses, although the copyright date is
        1997. Updike's main character also moves through time,
        and becomes a main character in Biblical stories.
        Updike's work has a theological approach as well, and he
        also questions accepted dogma. <br><br><br>I haven't
        finished it yet, but I wonder if anyone else in this
        discussion group has read it, and seen a similarity.
        <br><br> How does Milan Kundera react to these "profane"
        works?
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.