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Haroun and the Sea of Stories

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  • drmasyed
    Just finished it. Have no idea what the point to this book is. HELP!
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 8, 2003
      Just finished it. Have no idea what the point to this book is.

      HELP!
    • liquidmice
      Good timing… I just finished Haroun about 3 months ago. So at least you and I can generate some banter on one of Rushdie s least popular works. `Haroun And
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 10, 2003
        Good timing… I just finished Haroun about 3 months ago. So at
        least you and I can generate some banter on one of Rushdie's
        least popular works. `Haroun And The Sea Of Stories' is
        Rushdie's attempt at a children's story. So, if you
        didn't know that going into the read, you probably had a pretty
        bizarre experience. My thoughts are as follows: Haroun is a
        rather complex (for a children's book) fairytale about the magic
        land where stories/tales/imagination originate. The fairytale is
        an allegory for the creative process of storytelling. Rushdie toys
        around with the idea of creative energies and destructive
        energies, and weaves an intricate tale of their battle. Obviously
        Rushdie is referencing his own experience with the destructive
        energies that violently reacted to his most famous tale `The
        Satanic Verses.'

        When taken in the context of a children's tale, I think the book
        is a successful, playful creation.

        If you have any interest in movies, I HIGHLY suggest checking
        out Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet's film `THE CITY OF LOST
        CHILDREN.' Caro and Jeunet are best known for the film
        `Amelie.' `THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN' is a bizarre
        tale about a mad scientist who cannot dream and therefore
        kidnaps children in an attempt to tap into their dreams. The film
        closely parallels Haroun, so much so that you may wonder if
        Caro and Jeunet were inspired by Rushdie's story. LOST
        CHILDREN is a French film, so get the DVD if possible so that
        you may hear it dubbed in English. Please please please write
        back if you see the film. I will be interested in your reaction to
        the film and interested to see if it helps to clarify Rushdie's
        motivation in Haroun.

        P.S. What inspired you to pick up Haroun?

        p e a c e



        drmasyed wrote:
        > Just finished it. Have no idea what the point to this book is.
        >
        > HELP!
      • drmasyed
        Obviously ... I think that explains very well what the book is about. The book may be a fairy tale for children, but frankly I enjoyed it very much. Perhaps
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 15, 2003
          Obviously
          > Rushdie is referencing his own experience with the destructive
          > energies that violently reacted to his most famous tale `The
          > Satanic Verses.'


          I think that explains very well what the book is about. The book may
          be a fairy tale for children, but frankly I enjoyed it very much.
          Perhaps its because my native tongue is Urdu and Rushdie uses a lot
          of Urdu words to name his characters.

          The reason why I picjed this book is quite simply because it is a
          Rushdie. I had read Midnights Children and the Satanic verses before
          and I just cannot have enough of Rushdie. So I read Haroun and I am
          presently reading East, West.






          --- In salmanrushdie@yahoogroups.com, liquidmice <no_reply@y...>
          wrote:
          > Good timing… I just finished Haroun about 3 months ago. So at
          > least you and I can generate some banter on one of Rushdie's
          > least popular works. `Haroun And The Sea Of Stories' is
          > Rushdie's attempt at a children's story. So, if you
          > didn't know that going into the read, you probably had a pretty
          > bizarre experience. My thoughts are as follows: Haroun is a
          > rather complex (for a children's book) fairytale about the magic
          > land where stories/tales/imagination originate. The fairytale is
          > an allegory for the creative process of storytelling. Rushdie toys
          > around with the idea of creative energies and destructive
          > energies, and weaves an intricate tale of their battle. Obviously
          > Rushdie is referencing his own experience with the destructive
          > energies that violently reacted to his most famous tale `The
          > Satanic Verses.'
          >
          > When taken in the context of a children's tale, I think the book
          > is a successful, playful creation.
          >
          > If you have any interest in movies, I HIGHLY suggest checking
          > out Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet's film `THE CITY OF LOST
          > CHILDREN.' Caro and Jeunet are best known for the film
          > `Amelie.' `THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN' is a bizarre
          > tale about a mad scientist who cannot dream and therefore
          > kidnaps children in an attempt to tap into their dreams. The film
          > closely parallels Haroun, so much so that you may wonder if
          > Caro and Jeunet were inspired by Rushdie's story. LOST
          > CHILDREN is a French film, so get the DVD if possible so that
          > you may hear it dubbed in English. Please please please write
          > back if you see the film. I will be interested in your reaction to
          > the film and interested to see if it helps to clarify Rushdie's
          > motivation in Haroun.
          >
          > P.S. What inspired you to pick up Haroun?
          >
          > p e a c e
          >
          >
          >
          > drmasyed wrote:
          > > Just finished it. Have no idea what the point to this book is.
          > >
          > > HELP!
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