Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Greetings.

Expand Messages
  • dirkdiggler4567
    I don t know you. You don t know the half of it. Be careful where you aim, because where you aim you just might hit. You can t even remember what I m trying to
    Message 1 of 128 , Nov 2, 2001
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I don't know you. You don't know the half of it.
      Be careful where you aim, because where you aim you
      just might hit. You can't even remember what I'm
      trying to forget. It was a Dirty Day.<br><br>You want
      explanations? You need someone to blame? Throw a rock in the
      air, you're bound to hit someone guilty. From father
      to son, in one life has begun a world that's never
      done. <br><br>Get it right. There's no blood thicker
      than ink. Nothings as simple as you think. Wake up,
      some things you can't get around. I'm in you, more so,
      when they put me in the ground.<br><br>Those days ran
      away like horses over the hill.
    • snow_beltreallydeep
      I will keep my eyes open for your suggested title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we heard that Christianity hasn t been maligned in novels, and
      Message 128 of 128 , Jan 9, 2002
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        I will keep my eyes open for your suggested
        title. With the controversy over The Satanic Verses we
        heard that Christianity hasn't been maligned in novels,
        and if it were, Christians would be very vocal in
        protesting such a novel.<br><br><br>Not Wanted On the Voyage
        by Timothey Findlay is quite the version of Noah's
        Ark, and although I'm not a Christian, I kept glancing
        over my shoulder, on the look out for lightening bolts
        all the time I was reading it. (It is a brilliant
        book.)<br><br>I'm reading a John Updike novel now, "Toward the End
        of Time", seemingly written around the same time as
        The Satanic Verses, although the copyright date is
        1997. Updike's main character also moves through time,
        and becomes a main character in Biblical stories.
        Updike's work has a theological approach as well, and he
        also questions accepted dogma. <br><br><br>I haven't
        finished it yet, but I wonder if anyone else in this
        discussion group has read it, and seen a similarity.
        <br><br> How does Milan Kundera react to these "profane"
        works?
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.