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154Re: Haroun and the Sea of Stories

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  • drmasyed
    Oct 15, 2003
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      Obviously
      > Rushdie is referencing his own experience with the destructive
      > energies that violently reacted to his most famous tale `The
      > Satanic Verses.'


      I think that explains very well what the book is about. The book may
      be a fairy tale for children, but frankly I enjoyed it very much.
      Perhaps its because my native tongue is Urdu and Rushdie uses a lot
      of Urdu words to name his characters.

      The reason why I picjed this book is quite simply because it is a
      Rushdie. I had read Midnights Children and the Satanic verses before
      and I just cannot have enough of Rushdie. So I read Haroun and I am
      presently reading East, West.






      --- In salmanrushdie@yahoogroups.com, liquidmice <no_reply@y...>
      wrote:
      > Good timingÂ… I just finished Haroun about 3 months ago. So at
      > least you and I can generate some banter on one of Rushdie's
      > least popular works. `Haroun And The Sea Of Stories' is
      > Rushdie's attempt at a children's story. So, if you
      > didn't know that going into the read, you probably had a pretty
      > bizarre experience. My thoughts are as follows: Haroun is a
      > rather complex (for a children's book) fairytale about the magic
      > land where stories/tales/imagination originate. The fairytale is
      > an allegory for the creative process of storytelling. Rushdie toys
      > around with the idea of creative energies and destructive
      > energies, and weaves an intricate tale of their battle. Obviously
      > Rushdie is referencing his own experience with the destructive
      > energies that violently reacted to his most famous tale `The
      > Satanic Verses.'
      >
      > When taken in the context of a children's tale, I think the book
      > is a successful, playful creation.
      >
      > If you have any interest in movies, I HIGHLY suggest checking
      > out Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet's film `THE CITY OF LOST
      > CHILDREN.' Caro and Jeunet are best known for the film
      > `Amelie.' `THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN' is a bizarre
      > tale about a mad scientist who cannot dream and therefore
      > kidnaps children in an attempt to tap into their dreams. The film
      > closely parallels Haroun, so much so that you may wonder if
      > Caro and Jeunet were inspired by Rushdie's story. LOST
      > CHILDREN is a French film, so get the DVD if possible so that
      > you may hear it dubbed in English. Please please please write
      > back if you see the film. I will be interested in your reaction to
      > the film and interested to see if it helps to clarify Rushdie's
      > motivation in Haroun.
      >
      > P.S. What inspired you to pick up Haroun?
      >
      > p e a c e
      >
      >
      >
      > drmasyed wrote:
      > > Just finished it. Have no idea what the point to this book is.
      > >
      > > HELP!
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