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Re: [sl] Re: sacred landscape and place

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  • Jill Friestad
    SaraAnne... which paper do you write for? can we read it on line? it sounds lovely! Be Well! Jill ________________________________ From: SaraAnneC@AOL.com
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 20, 2009
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      SaraAnne...
      which paper do you write for?
      can we read it on line?
      it sounds lovely!
       
      Be Well!  Jill


      From: "SaraAnneC@..." <SaraAnneC@...>
      To: sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 5:14:54 PM
      Subject: Re: [sl] Re: sacred landscape and place
         

      I have found paradise in my backyard
      My most sacred moments happen in my small, walled backyard garden. It is sanctuary, it is the source of inspiration, of solace and of that "Peace which surpasseth all understanding. "
      I write a column for my local newspaper based on my observations about the larger world from my backyard garden....
      SaraAnne

      __________________________________________________
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    • Daniel N. Washburn
      Hi, Chris With multiple times, intersections, mytho-geographies and points of view how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and reveals
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 21, 2009
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        Hi, Chris

        With multiple times, intersections, mytho-geographies and points of
        view how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and
        reveals paradise?

        Dan

        Chris wrote:

        >How do you define the "sacred landscape"? I used to think of this as mytho-geography or even "mytho-scape" but I have since learned that there are three scholarly fields that intersect this topic:
        >
        >Cultural Geography;
        >Environmental Psychology; and
        >Landscape Archaeology.
        >
        >There are likely more but that is all I have found so far. In addition, there are many writers who talk about the "idea" of a landscape; the "invisible" landscape; a "cultural" landscape; or a "symbolic" landscape.
        >
        >This leads me to think that there is not one landscape but many and that there is no such thing as one-point perspective when it comes to space: instead, there are a multiplicity of spaces and not even just in terms of people but also, or specifically, in reference to time. Look upon your sacred landscape and ask, What time is this place?
        >
        >Place is storied space and, from this vantage point, it is not unlike a sacred structure...I still think Margaret Visser's, "The Geometry of Love" articulated this better and more eloquently than most. Everything in a cathedral has meaning and, if it does not, it will in time. This is true of landscape as well. But perhaps I can also ask, what place is this time?
        >
        >It is mapping a kind of soul, either externalizing internal landscapes or internalizing external ones. The external world is a cognitive state. The poet looks at the world and sees the soul; the sacred landscaper looks at the soul and sees the world.
        >
        >Does the eye have a mind? I walked the land with my eye's mind.
        >
        >Stay in one place too long and you are overwhelmed with ghosts; move around too much and your life lacks them. Or does it? Your mind still wanders where the heart is. It is the spirit of place, the genius loci.
        >
        >Sacred landscapers are internal topographers and geo-mythologists: we read between the ages not just between the lines. Countries are temporary things. Again, what time is this place?
        >
        >I have found paradise in my backyard simply by floating in a pool and looking up at the clouds in the sky. It is at that point that the landscape comes alive...it is then that it is...sacred. Yet my neighbor sees it not. Truly, a storied and multiple space indeed.
        >
        >Chris
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >--- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, Chris <groups@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >>My dos centos:
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>> One of the things that bugs me about the SL list is the tendency to mix up
        >>> religion with the *sacred*.
        >>>
        >>> I do not think that a "religious" place is a "sacred" place.
        >>>
        >>> For me, these two ideas (religion and the sacred) are related in the same
        >>> way that hot and cold are related - they may be about the same phenomena,
        >>> however they are opposites - the more religion, then the less sacred and
        >>> vice versa. I have very grave issues with religion - most especially the
        >>> one that I was raised with, Christian-ism. I deliberately put the "ism" on
        >>> it to distinguish between the real McCoy and what 99% of the BS is about
        >>> these days.
        >>>
        >>> I think that it is entirely possible to write about *sacred* places and
        >>> ideas and feelings *without* going into religion. Just like it is possible
        >>> to talk about people *without* referring to *race*.
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>I think this is the first time you have completely summarized your views on
        >>this matter, at least so plainly that I could understand them. I gather you
        >>are a strict materialist but have difficulty reconciling materialism with a
        >>concept of the sacred.
        >>
        >>My own ideas have focused ever more sharply on this idea of the sacred
        >>landscape. Or, put differently, a mytho-scape, one in which imagination and
        >>land intertwine to play parts in a fugue between man and his world, person
        >>and place, soul and land around.
        >>
        >>I recently took a short trip from the east coast of Canada to its half-way
        >>point (near Detroit). Driving back I was obsessing over the amount of cars
        >>on the road. I had had a near accident because a municipal vehicle was
        >>spraying anti-icing agents on the highway and, little did I know, it would
        >>soon be all over my windshield. My washer fluid spray wasn't working and I
        >>could not see out the window. Literally and near-fatally. The next
        >>available moment I pulled over and had that fixed. But it changed my
        >>attitude toward the land around me and sort of marked the remaining trip in
        >>a slightly less rose-colored lens.
        >>
        >>Meanwhile I was driving through unfamiliar roads and territory. Some cars
        >>struck me as friendly while the bulk of them seemed un-so. Finally, after
        >>two or so days of making my sluggish way through the Canadian Shield I
        >>entered my home province. Now a funny thing happened to me on the way
        >>across the border: in my imagination I seemed to recognize the land around
        >>me more. Suddenly it became more familiar and less acutely hostile. But
        >>this is silly since I knew those particular roads hardly at all: driven them
        >>a few times but nothing that you could call intimate knowledge. Still, it
        >>was a powerful conviction of mine that I had crossed a certain line and what
        >>followed had less shocks and more familiar sights.
        >>
        >>My point is that this was all in my imagination and partially as the result
        >>of my reentering an area I identify with at some level--my "home province".
        >>I think this is a bit silly, however, since one can hardly identify with all
        >>parts of such a large land area.
        >>
        >>I say this just to illustrate the power of the imagination over the land
        >>around: just by knowing I had crossed a certain, silly line my entire
        >>impression of the area changed as a result.
        >>
        >>Currently, I am pursuing the elusive concept of "place". In researching
        >>traditional sacred places, such as temples and churches, one of the more
        >>prominent qualities that emerge is the importance of the location. Wars are
        >>fought for the very fact of place.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>These days, with increased mobility, and especially my own, I am growing
        >>suspect of such claims. What is it that makes one place more special than
        >>any other? It is just that it is personal. While this is hardly surprising,
        >>what makes it novel is that we are rooted to ideas that have no *real* basis
        >>for being rooted in. If we are willing to die for land our ancestor's fought
        >>for, than we are practicing nothing short of ancestor worship. And as I have
        >>come to decide, ancestor worship is nothing but animism under a different
        >>name. And what a blow that is to high and mighty monotheist
        >>presumptuousness.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>I'm still sorting my ideas out on this complex and intricate subject. But
        >>why not check out my inspiration for this:
        >>
        >>http://www.bethelks.edu/mennonitelife/2000june/koontz_article_pf.php
        >>
        >>
        >>-Chris
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Topics suitable for discussion in this e-list can be found at:
        >http://www.luckymojo.com/sacredland.html
        >
        >To UNsubscribe, send email to:
        >sacredlandscapelist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • euxenite2000
        haha...I see you are still trying to lead this old horse to monotheistic water. heh. all I can say is, my attempt at explanation is a poor effort to put words
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 21, 2009
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          haha...I see you are still trying to lead this old horse to monotheistic water. heh.

          all I can say is, my attempt at explanation is a poor effort to put words to the dreamtime. like naming the psychedelic experience, it just doesn't work. I had a vision the other day that jesus' teachings were just his way to put his powerful emotions into words. that's why he relied on metaphor: it comes closest to articulating what cannot be said. put differently, what is jesus but love? love has many times been re-born; and love has died many times only to make us stronger in the end. just think about the resiliency in your own life...

          I think for me it is about putting names to this strange fixation we have with imagining our surroundings to be something other than pure material. "place is storied space." that is as simple as it can be said, I think.

          you ask: how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and reveals paradise? to which I can only reply, is god in the details? or is god in the process?

          Chris


          --- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel N. Washburn" <danw@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, Chris
          >
          > With multiple times, intersections, mytho-geographies and points of
          > view how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and
          > reveals paradise?
          >
          > Dan
          >
          > Chris wrote:
          >
          > >How do you define the "sacred landscape"? I used to think of this as mytho-geography or even "mytho-scape" but I have since learned that there are three scholarly fields that intersect this topic:
          > >
          > >Cultural Geography;
          > >Environmental Psychology; and
          > >Landscape Archaeology.
          > >
          > >There are likely more but that is all I have found so far. In addition, there are many writers who talk about the "idea" of a landscape; the "invisible" landscape; a "cultural" landscape; or a "symbolic" landscape.
          > >
          > >This leads me to think that there is not one landscape but many and that there is no such thing as one-point perspective when it comes to space: instead, there are a multiplicity of spaces and not even just in terms of people but also, or specifically, in reference to time. Look upon your sacred landscape and ask, What time is this place?
          > >
          > >Place is storied space and, from this vantage point, it is not unlike a sacred structure...I still think Margaret Visser's, "The Geometry of Love" articulated this better and more eloquently than most. Everything in a cathedral has meaning and, if it does not, it will in time. This is true of landscape as well. But perhaps I can also ask, what place is this time?
          > >
          > >It is mapping a kind of soul, either externalizing internal landscapes or internalizing external ones. The external world is a cognitive state. The poet looks at the world and sees the soul; the sacred landscaper looks at the soul and sees the world.
          > >
          > >Does the eye have a mind? I walked the land with my eye's mind.
          > >
          > >Stay in one place too long and you are overwhelmed with ghosts; move around too much and your life lacks them. Or does it? Your mind still wanders where the heart is. It is the spirit of place, the genius loci.
          > >
          > >Sacred landscapers are internal topographers and geo-mythologists: we read between the ages not just between the lines. Countries are temporary things. Again, what time is this place?
          > >
          > >I have found paradise in my backyard simply by floating in a pool and looking up at the clouds in the sky. It is at that point that the landscape comes alive...it is then that it is...sacred. Yet my neighbor sees it not. Truly, a storied and multiple space indeed.
          > >
          > >Chris
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >--- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, Chris <groups@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >>My dos centos:
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>> One of the things that bugs me about the SL list is the tendency to mix up
          > >>> religion with the *sacred*.
          > >>>
          > >>> I do not think that a "religious" place is a "sacred" place.
          > >>>
          > >>> For me, these two ideas (religion and the sacred) are related in the same
          > >>> way that hot and cold are related - they may be about the same phenomena,
          > >>> however they are opposites - the more religion, then the less sacred and
          > >>> vice versa. I have very grave issues with religion - most especially the
          > >>> one that I was raised with, Christian-ism. I deliberately put the "ism" on
          > >>> it to distinguish between the real McCoy and what 99% of the BS is about
          > >>> these days.
          > >>>
          > >>> I think that it is entirely possible to write about *sacred* places and
          > >>> ideas and feelings *without* going into religion. Just like it is possible
          > >>> to talk about people *without* referring to *race*.
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>I think this is the first time you have completely summarized your views on
          > >>this matter, at least so plainly that I could understand them. I gather you
          > >>are a strict materialist but have difficulty reconciling materialism with a
          > >>concept of the sacred.
          > >>
          > >>My own ideas have focused ever more sharply on this idea of the sacred
          > >>landscape. Or, put differently, a mytho-scape, one in which imagination and
          > >>land intertwine to play parts in a fugue between man and his world, person
          > >>and place, soul and land around.
          > >>
          > >>I recently took a short trip from the east coast of Canada to its half-way
          > >>point (near Detroit). Driving back I was obsessing over the amount of cars
          > >>on the road. I had had a near accident because a municipal vehicle was
          > >>spraying anti-icing agents on the highway and, little did I know, it would
          > >>soon be all over my windshield. My washer fluid spray wasn't working and I
          > >>could not see out the window. Literally and near-fatally. The next
          > >>available moment I pulled over and had that fixed. But it changed my
          > >>attitude toward the land around me and sort of marked the remaining trip in
          > >>a slightly less rose-colored lens.
          > >>
          > >>Meanwhile I was driving through unfamiliar roads and territory. Some cars
          > >>struck me as friendly while the bulk of them seemed un-so. Finally, after
          > >>two or so days of making my sluggish way through the Canadian Shield I
          > >>entered my home province. Now a funny thing happened to me on the way
          > >>across the border: in my imagination I seemed to recognize the land around
          > >>me more. Suddenly it became more familiar and less acutely hostile. But
          > >>this is silly since I knew those particular roads hardly at all: driven them
          > >>a few times but nothing that you could call intimate knowledge. Still, it
          > >>was a powerful conviction of mine that I had crossed a certain line and what
          > >>followed had less shocks and more familiar sights.
          > >>
          > >>My point is that this was all in my imagination and partially as the result
          > >>of my reentering an area I identify with at some level--my "home province".
          > >>I think this is a bit silly, however, since one can hardly identify with all
          > >>parts of such a large land area.
          > >>
          > >>I say this just to illustrate the power of the imagination over the land
          > >>around: just by knowing I had crossed a certain, silly line my entire
          > >>impression of the area changed as a result.
          > >>
          > >>Currently, I am pursuing the elusive concept of "place". In researching
          > >>traditional sacred places, such as temples and churches, one of the more
          > >>prominent qualities that emerge is the importance of the location. Wars are
          > >>fought for the very fact of place.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>These days, with increased mobility, and especially my own, I am growing
          > >>suspect of such claims. What is it that makes one place more special than
          > >>any other? It is just that it is personal. While this is hardly surprising,
          > >>what makes it novel is that we are rooted to ideas that have no *real* basis
          > >>for being rooted in. If we are willing to die for land our ancestor's fought
          > >>for, than we are practicing nothing short of ancestor worship. And as I have
          > >>come to decide, ancestor worship is nothing but animism under a different
          > >>name. And what a blow that is to high and mighty monotheist
          > >>presumptuousness.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>I'm still sorting my ideas out on this complex and intricate subject. But
          > >>why not check out my inspiration for this:
          > >>
          > >>http://www.bethelks.edu/mennonitelife/2000june/koontz_article_pf.php
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>-Chris
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >------------------------------------
          > >
          > >Topics suitable for discussion in this e-list can be found at:
          > >http://www.luckymojo.com/sacredland.html
          > >
          > >To UNsubscribe, send email to:
          > >sacredlandscapelist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • eviewrayartist.com
          Chris,  Lovely, lovely, lovely. A 21st century muse talking dirt! I adore the phrase place is storied space .  Speaking of which: Here at the Geodetic
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 22, 2009
          • 0 Attachment

            Chris,
             Lovely, lovely, lovely. A 21st century muse talking dirt! I adore the phrase
            " place is storied space".
             Speaking of which: Here at the Geodetic Center I am preparing for our 2009 visitation rights! September 19th, Saturday at 9:30am we gather at the gate then trek to the hilltop that marks the site, a walk about, lunch, photos, friendship.
             Your visionary words about love reborn and resiliency match my life experience.
            You herald a new beginning for me and like white buffalo calf woman, I welcome love.
            hugs,

            --- On Fri, 8/21/09, euxenite2000 <groups@...> wrote:

            From: euxenite2000 <groups@...>
            Subject: [sl] Re: sacred landscape and place
            To: sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, August 21, 2009, 11:44 PM

             
            haha...I see you are still trying to lead this old horse to monotheistic water. heh.

            all I can say is, my attempt at explanation is a poor effort to put words to the dreamtime. like naming the psychedelic experience, it just doesn't work. I had a vision the other day that jesus' teachings were just his way to put his powerful emotions into words. that's why he relied on metaphor: it comes closest to articulating what cannot be said. put differently, what is jesus but love? love has many times been re-born; and love has died many times only to make us stronger in the end. just think about the resiliency in your own life...

            I think for me it is about putting names to this strange fixation we have with imagining our surroundings to be something other than pure material. "place is storied space." that is as simple as it can be said, I think.

            you ask: how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and reveals paradise? to which I can only reply, is god in the details? or is god in the process?

            Chris

            --- In sacredlandscapelist @yahoogroups. com, "Daniel N. Washburn" <danw@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi, Chris
            >
            > With multiple times, intersections, mytho-geographies and points of
            > view how do we find the place where the landscape comes alive and
            > reveals paradise?
            >
            > Dan
            >
            > Chris wrote:
            >
            > >How do you define the "sacred landscape"? I used to think of this as mytho-geography or even "mytho-scape" but I have since learned that there are three scholarly fields that intersect this topic:
            > >
            > >Cultural Geography;
            > >Environmental Psychology; and
            > >Landscape Archaeology.
            > >
            > >There are likely more but that is all I have found so far. In addition, there are many writers who talk about the "idea" of a landscape; the "invisible" landscape; a "cultural" landscape; or a "symbolic" landscape.
            > >
            > >This leads me to think that there is not one landscape but many and that there is no such thing as one-point perspective when it comes to space: instead, there are a multiplicity of spaces and not even just in terms of people but also, or specifically, in reference to time. Look upon your sacred landscape and ask, What time is this place?
            > >
            > >Place is storied space and, from this vantage point, it is not unlike a sacred structure... I still think Margaret Visser's, "The Geometry of Love" articulated this better and more eloquently than most. Everything in a cathedral has meaning and, if it does not, it will in time. This is true of landscape as well. But perhaps I can also ask, what place is this time?
            > >
            > >It is mapping a kind of soul, either externalizing internal landscapes or internalizing external ones. The external world is a cognitive state. The poet looks at the world and sees the soul; the sacred landscaper looks at the soul and sees the world.
            > >
            > >Does the eye have a mind? I walked the land with my eye's mind.
            > >
            > >Stay in one place too long and you are overwhelmed with ghosts; move around too much and your life lacks them. Or does it? Your mind still wanders where the heart is. It is the spirit of place, the genius loci.
            > >
            > >Sacred landscapers are internal topographers and geo-mythologists: we read between the ages not just between the lines. Countries are temporary things. Again, what time is this place?
            > >
            > >I have found paradise in my backyard simply by floating in a pool and looking up at the clouds in the sky. It is at that point that the landscape comes alive...it is then that it is...sacred. Yet my neighbor sees it not. Truly, a storied and multiple space indeed.
            > >
            > >Chris
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >--- In sacredlandscapelist @yahoogroups. com, Chris <groups@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >>My dos centos:
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>> One of the things that bugs me about the SL list is the tendency to mix up
            > >>> religion with the *sacred*.
            > >>>
            > >>> I do not think that a "religious" place is a "sacred" place.
            > >>>
            > >>> For me, these two ideas (religion and the sacred) are related in the same
            > >>> way that hot and cold are related - they may be about the same phenomena,
            > >>> however they are opposites - the more religion, then the less sacred and
            > >>> vice versa. I have very grave issues with religion - most especially the
            > >>> one that I was raised with, Christian-ism. I deliberately put the "ism" on
            > >>> it to distinguish between the real McCoy and what 99% of the BS is about
            > >>> these days.
            > >>>
            > >>> I think that it is entirely possible to write about *sacred* places and
            > >>> ideas and feelings *without* going into religion. Just like it is possible
            > >>> to talk about people *without* referring to *race*.
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >>I think this is the first time you have completely summarized your views on
            > >>this matter, at least so plainly that I could understand them. I gather you
            > >>are a strict materialist but have difficulty reconciling materialism with a
            > >>concept of the sacred.
            > >>
            > >>My own ideas have focused ever more sharply on this idea of the sacred
            > >>landscape. Or, put differently, a mytho-scape, one in which imagination and
            > >>land intertwine to play parts in a fugue between man and his world, person
            > >>and place, soul and land around.
            > >>
            > >>I recently took a short trip from the east coast of Canada to its half-way
            > >>point (near Detroit). Driving back I was obsessing over the amount of cars
            > >>on the road. I had had a near accident because a municipal vehicle was
            > >>spraying anti-icing agents on the highway and, little did I know, it would
            > >>soon be all over my windshield. My washer fluid spray wasn't working and I
            > >>could not see out the window. Literally and near-fatally. The next
            > >>available moment I pulled over and had that fixed. But it changed my
            > >>attitude toward the land around me and sort of marked the remaining trip in
            > >>a slightly less rose-colored lens.
            > >>
            > >>Meanwhile I was driving through unfamiliar roads and territory. Some cars
            > >>struck me as friendly while the bulk of them seemed un-so. Finally, after
            > >>two or so days of making my sluggish way through the Canadian Shield I
            > >>entered my home province. Now a funny thing happened to me on the way
            > >>across the border: in my imagination I seemed to recognize the land around
            > >>me more. Suddenly it became more familiar and less acutely hostile. But
            > >>this is silly since I knew those particular roads hardly at all: driven them
            > >>a few times but nothing that you could call intimate knowledge. Still, it
            > >>was a powerful conviction of mine that I had crossed a certain line and what
            > >>followed had less shocks and more familiar sights.
            > >>
            > >>My point is that this was all in my imagination and partially as the result
            > >>of my reentering an area I identify with at some level--my "home province".
            > >>I think this is a bit silly, however, since one can hardly identify with all
            > >>parts of such a large land area.
            > >>
            > >>I say this just to illustrate the power of the imagination over the land
            > >>around: just by knowing I had crossed a certain, silly line my entire
            > >>impression of the area changed as a result.
            > >>
            > >>Currently, I am pursuing the elusive concept of "place". In researching
            > >>traditional sacred places, such as temples and churches, one of the more
            > >>prominent qualities that emerge is the importance of the location. Wars are
            > >>fought for the very fact of place.
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>These days, with increased mobility, and especially my own, I am growing
            > >>suspect of such claims. What is it that makes one place more special than
            > >>any other? It is just that it is personal. While this is hardly surprising,
            > >>what makes it novel is that we are rooted to ideas that have no *real* basis
            > >>for being rooted in. If we are willing to die for land our ancestor's fought
            > >>for, than we are practicing nothing short of ancestor worship. And as I have
            > >>come to decide, ancestor worship is nothing but animism under a different
            > >>name. And what a blow that is to high and mighty monotheist
            > >>presumptuousness.
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>I'm still sorting my ideas out on this complex and intricate subject. But
            > >>why not check out my inspiration for this:
            > >>
            > >>http://www.bethelks .edu/mennoniteli fe/2000june/ koontz_article_ pf.php
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>-Chris
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >----------- --------- --------- -------
            > >
            > >Topics suitable for discussion in this e-list can be found at:
            > >http://www.luckymoj o.com/sacredland .html
            > >
            > >To UNsubscribe, send email to:
            > >sacredlandscapelist -unsubscribe@ yahoogroups. com
            > >Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >


          • SaraAnneC@AOL.com
            In a message dated 8/21/2009 10:06:16 P.M. Central Daylight Time, emailangel33@yahoo.com writes: SaraAnne... which paper do you write for? can we read it on
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 25, 2009
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              In a message dated 8/21/2009 10:06:16 P.M. Central Daylight Time, emailangel33@... writes:


              SaraAnne...
              which paper do you write for?
              can we read it on line?
              it sounds lovely!
               
              Be Well!  Jill
               
              Sorry for the slow response, Jill; I was trying to figure out a way to post links to specific columns I have written -- allowing me the luxury of choosing some of my favorites (since Yahoogroups does not, to my knowledge, allow attachments) but I am not tech-savvy enough to figure it out.
               
              So ... I have to open up the entire archive.... and I write other mostly lifestyle features for the paper in addition to my column, so you will, perhaps unfortunately, have to wade through on your own.
               
              The paper is the Evansville Courier and Press, in Evansville, Indiana
               
              www.courierpress.com  will get you there, where you will then have to type my proper name into the key word search box.
               
              But the quickest way to get to me, so to speak, is to Google my proper name, Sara Anne Corrigan.... the Courier web site will likely be the first hit..... among many....
               
              Thanks for your interest.... I used to write this column weekly, but since last April, after a major downsizing (both in the physical size of the paper and the staff the produces it) I was but back to about once every five weeks..... always on Saturdays..... in a rotation with other "guest ministers" which makes me smile because I am in no way a professional clergyperson.... decades ago I thought I wanted to go to divinity school but real world concerns, including motherhood, sent me off in other directions.....
               
              SaraAnne
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