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Re: [sl] Art notes

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  • Chris
    Hi SaraAnne, I was confused by the context: do you mean Picasso is a genius for asking? Or that real genius will ask, regardless what Picasso thinks? -Chris
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 1, 2006
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      Hi SaraAnne,

      I was confused by the context: do you mean Picasso is a genius for
      asking? Or that real genius' will ask, regardless what Picasso thinks?

      -Chris

      --- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, SaraAnneC@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 10/31/2006 3:39:42 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      > groups@... writes:
      >
      > "Is It Necessary to Understand Art?"
      > by Pablo Picasso
      >
      >
      >
      > This just reminded me of a favorite quote from Salvadore Dali:
      >
      > "It is the property of pure genius to disturb all settled ideas."
      >
      > He was an artist but this sentiment extends far beyond the visual....
      >
      > SarAnne
      >
    • SaraAnneC@AOL.com
      In a message dated 11/1/2006 11:58:12 A.M. Central Standard Time, groups@gravesnet.com writes: I was confused by the context: do you mean Picasso is a genius
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 1, 2006
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        In a message dated 11/1/2006 11:58:12 A.M. Central Standard Time, groups@... writes:
        I was confused by the context: do you mean Picasso is a genius for
        asking? Or that real genius' will ask, regardless what Picasso thinks?

        I believe that Dali's reference applies to many artists and many art forms.
         
        Picasso, I believe, was among many great artists (as judged by history) who pushed the envelope and disturbed "settled ideas" in his artistic style (later work -- I recall his very sweet and sentimental "blue period" before he launched into his abstract work) and, by pushing the envelope of public opinion, caused the rest of us to stop and think and, in many cases, revise our "opinions."
         
        On the other hand, Picasso's question is a fair one ... we do often attempt to (over) analyze works of art, music and literature, often to the detriment of our ability to enjoy it.
         
        I recall a book I read in college entitled "The Overwrought Urn" that addresses the habit literature students have of trying to figure out a writer's "deeper meaning" in a poem, etc.
         
        SaraAnne
         
      • danw888
        ... of a ... us ... Interesting that inhuman nature is capable of creating beauty as well as human beings! I m with the don t have to understand it crowd
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 2, 2006
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          --- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, "Chris" <groups@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > here's what Picasso has to say on our thread:
          >
          > "Is It Necessary to Understand Art?"
          > by Pablo Picasso
          >
          > Every one tries to understand art. I wonder, therefore, if it is
          > permissible to ask: Why doesn't one try to understand the singing
          of a
          > bird? Why do we love night, the flowers and all the beauty around
          us
          > ... without the desire to analyze their mysteries?
          >
          > The moment it comes to a piece of art, people insist they have to
          > understand it. Why?
          >
          Interesting that inhuman nature is capable of creating beauty as
          well as human beings! I'm with the 'don't have to understand it
          crowd' for human created works of art, but presumably we operate on
          levels of symbolism, so its understandable that people ask 'but what
          does it mean?'


          > If people could only comprehend that an artist must create because
          he
          > has to create, because he is possessed by his art. The artist is
          only
          > a very tiny part of the universe, and should not receive more
          > attention than anything else on earth that gives us beauty, joy and
          > replenishment.
          >
          > I would never expect from any views of my pictures that a person
          could
          > experience the same emotions as I had when I painted them.
          >
          > A picture reaches me from far distances and sources. How could
          anyone
          > grasp my dreams, my instincts and ideas, which emerged after a long
          > time span and needed to mature until they found a visual
          expression.
          >
          > And how could anyone then see what I really meant to say and
          perhaps
          > had to express against my own will?
          >
          Here he is confessing to being a lousy artist. His expression
          emerges from deep in his innards, it is incomprehensible to anyone
          else. Meaning he has not been able to effectively communicate what
          he is trying to say. It is like a bird singing, we don't understand
          what it means but it is beautiful. But he is not a bird, he is a
          human being.


          > With the exception of some very few artists who have opened new
          > horizons for the arts, most of the young painters of today do not
          seem
          > to know in what direction they want to go. Instead of utilizing
          their
          > own interpretations and then searching for their own ways, so many
          > believe in re-awakening the past and reviving it, and all this in a
          > time when the whole wide world is open to them and waiting for
          action
          > and new ideas.
          >
          So the birds are all singing the same old beautiful songs. Why
          should there be a premium on the new? If these artists are
          satisfied with the old interpretation, why should they search for
          new, individual styles?


          > It is not only the question of clinging with fears to the past, but
          > clinging to old art forms which have fulfilled their missions.
          >

          old art forms that have fulfilled thier missions? How can he tell
          if an art form has fulfilled its mission and, since for him art is a
          type of human birdsong, it has no intelligible meaning anyway so why
          do we need new forms?



          > Today we have miles of pictures "in the style of ... so and so,"
          but
          > to find a young artist who is painting in his own style is a real
          rarity.
          >
          > I'm not a pessimist. I'm not against any art form, because I could
          not
          > live without art, without giving all my own time to art.
          >
          > I love art as my only reason for my own existence. Whatever I have
          > done in connection with it has given me enormous joy and
          satisfaction.
          >
          > But, therefore, I don't see any reason why so many people in the
          world
          > insist on analyzing art, concocting elaborate theories and
          > interpretations ... and persist in letting their own artistic
          > illiteracy run wild.
          >
          But he himself has some theory re art forms and their mission and a
          valuation that places individual, new styles over old styles. Their
          is a rationale in there somewhere, unless this Picasso bird is just
          whistling dixie.

          Dan


          > Exhibit 32 — May-June 1969
          >
          >
          > --- In sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com, einar kvaran <eeklon@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Jerry:
          > > Just when I tell myself "okay, self, no more one
          > > liners" I read one of your postings and my resolve
          > > goes "FLUSH." However, in an attempt to stick to the
          > > RULES I will try and include some footnotes in my
          > > responce, thereby making it . . . ... acceptable.
          > >
          > > I too go out and look at the stars every night , and
          > > even talk to them [Albert Einstein - "Me and the
          > > Stars, 1953 - Princeton U Press].
          > >
          > > " Often Academics have the final say as to what is
          > > Art"
          > >
          > > Yes, that is sadly true - or is it? "Time will have
          > > the final say, (after the Academics are dead and
          > > gone)." Egyptian Book of the Dead.
          > >
          > > And finally, regarding a posting a few back,
          > > connecting Music and sex, as a musician during a bit
          > > of the 1960s and a much larger piece of the
          > > following, I say, "Damn right." [Einar Einarsson
          > > Kvaran - Autobiography chapters 17 - 23]
          > >
          > > Life is supposed to be fun. eeeeeeek
          > >
          > > --- jkott333@ wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          _____________________________________________________________________
          _______________
          > > Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call
          rates
          > > (http://voice.yahoo.com)
          > >
          >
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