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Re: [sl] Not one but two souls

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  • mikebispham@aol.com
    In a message dated 31/08/06 06:02:31 GMT Daylight Time, eeklon@yahoo.com writes: So I am looking forward to your treatment of the two souls issue. My feeling
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 1, 2006
      In a message dated 31/08/06 06:02:31 GMT Daylight Time, eeklon@... writes:
      So I am looking forward to your treatment of the two
      souls issue. My feeling is that we [humans] have
      several, maybe lots of, souls. This is why so mnany
      of us can be re-incarnations of . . . ......
      Catherine the great, for example. eeeeeeeek
      This must mean that Catherine the Great had many (hundreds) of souls, each of which was the essential Catherine the Great, no?
       
      Do great people have more souls that us lesser mortals? 
       
       
       
       
      One of the chief sources for the modern  (ha!) concept of 'soul' is of course Plato.  here's a Wiki peice on his take:
       
      "Plato, drawing on the words of his teacher Socrates, considered the soul as the essence of a person, being that which decides how we act. He considered this essence as an incorporeal occupant of our being. The Platonic soul comprises three parts:
       
      the logos (mind, nous, superego, or reason)
      the thymos (emotion, ego, or spiritedness)
      the pathos (appetitive, id, or carnal)
      Each of these has a function in a balanced and peaceful soul.
       
      The logos equates to the mind. It corresponds to the charioteer, directing the balanced horses of appetite and spirit. It allows for logic to prevail, and for the optimisation of balance.
       
      The thymos comprises our emotional motive, that which drives us to acts of bravery and glory. If left unchecked, it leads to hubris -- the most fatal of all flaws in the Greek view.
       
      The pathos equates to the appetite that drives humankind to seek out its basic bodily needs. When the passion controls us, it drives us to hedonism in all forms. In the Ancient Greek view, this is the basal and most feral state."
       
      Interesting that one of the more interesting modern semi-equivalents, Freud's three part mind, is also tripartite in conception.
       
      Also of the reptilian/mammalian/modern brain physiological analysis.
       
      Mike
       
       
    • einar kvaran
      ... Well perhaps Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great and Peter the Great might each have a couple more. I m less sure of Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 2, 2006
        --- mikebispham@... wrote:

        > Do great people have more souls that us lesser
        > mortals?

        Well perhaps Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great
        and Peter the Great might each have a couple more.
        I'm less sure of Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the
        Impaler
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > One of the chief sources for the modern (ha!)
        > concept of 'soul' is of
        > course Plato. here's a Wiki peice on his take:

        I'm curious. Are you are Wikipedian? Is this, or a
        chunk of this, Plato Piece Perhaps your handiwork?
        eek


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      • mikebispham@aol.com
        In a message dated 02/09/06 15:42:02 GMT Daylight Time, eeklon@yahoo.com ... Well perhaps Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great and Peter the Great might
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 2, 2006
          In a message dated 02/09/06 15:42:02 GMT Daylight Time, eeklon@... writes:
          --- mikebispham@ aol.com wrote:

          > Do great people have more souls that us lesser
          > mortals?

          Well perhaps Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great
          and Peter the Great might each have a couple more.
          I'm less sure of Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the
          Impaler
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > One of the chief sources for the modern (ha!)
          > concept of 'soul' is of
          > course Plato. here's a Wiki peice on his take:

          I'm curious. Are you are Wikipedian? Is this, or a
          chunk of this, Plato Piece Perhaps your handiwork? "
          No, just came up quickly from a search, and seemed about right, fit for purpose...
           
          Mike 
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