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Doorst.: [Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places] Death Roads

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  • Marc Steurbaut
    ... Van: Marc Steurbaut Datum: 10/31/05 18:19:14 Aan: Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places@yahoogroups.com Onderwerp: [Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places] Death
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 31, 2005
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      -------Oorspronkelijk bericht-------
       
      Datum: 10/31/05 18:19:14
      Onderwerp: [Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places] Death Roads
       
       
      Viking cult roads ran straight to burial places and it was the practice to carry dead chieftains along these straight ceremonial roads to their final resting place. In historical times the link between straightness, death and burial can still be found. In Flanders and Holland, medieval 'doodwegen' (death roads) still survive in the landscape and it was along such dedicated roads that the dead were carried to a burial ground. Documentary evidence shows that in some circumstances it was illegal to carry a corpse on another road. The route had to be straight. Elsewhere rules were laid down as to their width and so on. Such routes were also common in Germany where they were known as geistewege or ghost roads. Such funeral paths were often straight, though not always. Also in Germany, some straight roads were deliberately engineered in the medieval period to link churches.
      Similar funeral paths survive in England as corpse ways, coffin paths and church roads. Some of Watkins' leys may have been the vestiges of medieval corpse ways. This might explain, more convincingly than site continuity, the occurrence of non-prehistoric features such as medieval churches and burial grounds on his leys.
      (Danny Sullivan)
       
      An example of a "death road" in Flanders:
       
      Marc
    • Daniel N. Washburn
      Hi, Marc - Any ideas as to why the death roads/ghost roads had to be straight? If you wandered about the ghost could get lost and haunt the living, maybe?
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 1, 2005
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        Hi, Marc -

        Any ideas as to why the death roads/ghost roads had to be straight? If
        you wandered about the ghost could get lost and haunt the living,
        maybe? But why assume that the gravesite was the jumping off place for
        the next world? Why not the deathsite?

        Dan

        Marc Steurbaut wrote:

        >
        >
        > -------Oorspronkelijk bericht-------
        >
        > Van: Marc Steurbaut <mailto:marc.steurbaut@...>
        > Datum: 10/31/05 18:19:14
        > Aan: Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places@yahoogroups.com>
        > Onderwerp: [Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places] Death Roads
        >
        >
        > Viking cult roads ran straight to burial places and it was the
        > practice to carry dead chieftains along these straight ceremonial
        > roads to their final resting place. In historical times the link
        > between straightness, death and burial can still be found. In Flanders
        > and Holland, medieval 'doodwegen' (death roads) still survive in the
        > landscape and it was along such dedicated roads that the dead were
        > carried to a burial ground. Documentary evidence shows that in some
        > circumstances it was illegal to carry a corpse on another road. The
        > route had to be straight. Elsewhere rules were laid down as to their
        > width and so on. Such routes were also common in Germany where they
        > were known as geistewege or ghost roads. Such funeral paths were often
        > straight, though not always. Also in Germany, some straight roads were
        > deliberately engineered in the medieval period to link churches.
        > Similar funeral paths survive in England as corpse ways, coffin paths
        > and church roads. Some of Watkins' leys may have been the vestiges of
        > medieval corpse ways. This might explain, more convincingly than site
        > continuity, the occurrence of non-prehistoric features such as
        > medieval churches and burial grounds on his leys.
        > (Danny Sullivan)
        >
        > An example of a "death road" in Flanders:
        > http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/9679/deathroad0am.jpg
        >
        > Marc
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <http://www.incredimail.com/index.asp?id=419&lang=19>
        >
        > Topics suitable for discussion in this e-list can be found at:
        > http://www.luckymojo.com/sacredland.html
        >
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      • Daniel N. Washburn
        Here is a quote from Beth Winegarner s web site about spirits and straightlines: Some sacred sites involve tales of faery activity, and in Ireland the leys are
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 1, 2005
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          Here is a quote from Beth Winegarner's web site about spirits and
          straightlines:

          Some sacred sites involve tales of faery activity, and in Ireland the
          leys are considered to be paths for faery movement. To build one's house
          along one of these paths is to ensure a lifetime of spiritual activity
          in the home. In The Middle Kingdom by Dermot McManus, two faery paths
          are discussed. In one instance, a man was advised to cut off a corner of
          his house because it was on a faery path and it interfered with "the
          passage of the Good People." Devereux and Pennick wrote, "Viewed [as a
          facilitation of spirit movement], the lines depict the traffic of a
          spirit landscape -- lines for temporarily disembodied human
          consciousness and, perhaps, for other spirits." The Swedish, the
          Balinese and the Lakota all believe that straight lines facilitate the
          passage of spirits along those lines. And Australian aborigines
          conceived of the land as a mesh of interconnecting lines of 'ways
          through,' called songlines, where specific lines and sites could be
          followed through the corresponding song.

          Daniel N. Washburn wrote:

          >Hi, Marc -
          >
          >Any ideas as to why the death roads/ghost roads had to be straight? If
          >you wandered about the ghost could get lost and haunt the living,
          >maybe? But why assume that the gravesite was the jumping off place for
          >the next world? Why not the deathsite?
          >
          >Dan
          >
          >Marc Steurbaut wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >>
          >>-------Oorspronkelijk bericht-------
          >>
          >>Van: Marc Steurbaut <mailto:marc.steurbaut@...>
          >>Datum: 10/31/05 18:19:14
          >>Aan: Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places@yahoogroups.com
          >><mailto:Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places@yahoogroups.com>
          >>Onderwerp: [Earth_Energies_and_Sacred_Places] Death Roads
          >>
          >>
          >>Viking cult roads ran straight to burial places and it was the
          >>practice to carry dead chieftains along these straight ceremonial
          >>roads to their final resting place. In historical times the link
          >>between straightness, death and burial can still be found. In Flanders
          >>and Holland, medieval 'doodwegen' (death roads) still survive in the
          >>landscape and it was along such dedicated roads that the dead were
          >>carried to a burial ground. Documentary evidence shows that in some
          >>circumstances it was illegal to carry a corpse on another road. The
          >>route had to be straight. Elsewhere rules were laid down as to their
          >>width and so on. Such routes were also common in Germany where they
          >>were known as geistewege or ghost roads. Such funeral paths were often
          >>straight, though not always. Also in Germany, some straight roads were
          >>deliberately engineered in the medieval period to link churches.
          >>Similar funeral paths survive in England as corpse ways, coffin paths
          >>and church roads. Some of Watkins' leys may have been the vestiges of
          >>medieval corpse ways. This might explain, more convincingly than site
          >>continuity, the occurrence of non-prehistoric features such as
          >>medieval churches and burial grounds on his leys.
          >>(Danny Sullivan)
          >>
          >>An example of a "death road" in Flanders:
          >>http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/9679/deathroad0am.jpg
          >>
          >>Marc
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >><http://www.incredimail.com/index.asp?id=419&lang=19>
          >>
          >>Topics suitable for discussion in this e-list can be found at:
          >>http://www.luckymojo.com/sacredland.html
          >>
          >>To UNsubscribe, send email to:
          >>sacredlandscapelist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >>
          >>
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          >> Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
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          >>
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          >>
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