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Golden Number: research paper...

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  • J Vincent Beall
    G Vincent
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 29, 2004
       
      Vincent
       
       
    • Chris
      Vincent, excellent link but I just want to re-send it because it didn t make it to non-html digest folks: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/week203.html Something
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 2, 2004
        Vincent, excellent link but I just want to re-send it because it didn't make
        it to non-html digest folks:

        http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/week203.html

        Something I learned from Dan and found confirmed here:

        "These days, the number G is called the Golden Number, the Golden Ratio, or
        the Golden Section. It's often denoted by the Greek letter Phi, after the
        Greek sculptor Phidias. Phidias helped design the Parthenon - and supposedly
        packed it full of golden rectangles, to make it as beautiful as possible."

        And something I learned from this page:

        "However, don't be fooled! The charm of the golden number tends to attract
        kooks and the gullible - hence the term "fool's gold". You have to be
        careful about anything you read about this number. In particular, if you
        think ancient Greeks ran around in togas philosophizing about the "golden
        ratio" and calling it "Phi", you're wrong. This number was named Phi after
        Phidias only in 1914, in a book called The Curves of Life by the artist
        Theodore Cook. And, it was Cook who first started calling 1.618... the
        golden ratio. Before him, 0.618... was called the golden ratio! Cook dubbed
        this number "phi", the lower-case baby brother of Phi.

        In fact, the whole "golden" terminology can only be traced back to 1826,
        when it showed up in a footnote to a book by one Martin Ohm, brother of
        Georg Ohm, the guy with the law about resistors. Before then, a lot of
        people called 1/G the "Divine Proportion". And the guy who started that was
        Luca Pacioli, a pal of Leonardo da Vinci who translated Euclid's Elements.
        In 1509, Pacioli published a 3-volume text entitled Divina Proportione,
        advertising the virtues of this number. Some people think da Vinci used the
        divine proportion in the composition of his paintings. If so, perhaps he got
        the idea from Pacioli. "

        1914. hmmm...

        > Subject: Golden Number: research paper...
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        > G
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        > Vincent
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