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re: Hamlet's Mill

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  • CG
    Siva, I don t know if you have seen this one already, but it is a Channel 4 production about the work Dr. Sullivan who set out to use the Incas in the Andes as
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2003
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      Siva,

      I don't know if you have seen this one already, but it is a Channel 4
      production about the work Dr. Sullivan who set out to use the Incas in the
      Andes as a "test case" for Hamlet's Mill.

      Twelve web pages beginning here:

      http://www.channel4.com/history/microsites/E/ends/inca1.html

      I have been re-reading parts of Hamlet's Mill. While I contest strongly the
      meandering way of expressing themselves, I admire that they took up the
      unenviable task of compiling as many myths, stories and poems they could
      find that support cosmological readings.

      "But obviously there is more, and what emerges here lifts the veil of a
      fundamental archaic design. The real actors on the stage of the universe
      are very few, if their adventures are many. The most "ancient treasure"--in
      Aristotle's word--that was left to us by our predecessors of the High and
      Far-Off Times was the idea that the gods are really stars, and that there
      are no others. The forces reside in the starry heavens, and all the
      stories, characters and adventures narrated by mythology concentrate on the
      active powers among the stars, who are the planets. A prodigious assignment
      it may seem for those few planets to account for all those stories and also
      to run the affairs of the whole universe. What, abstractly, might be for
      modern men the various motions of those points over the dial became, in
      times without writing, where all was entrusted to images and memory, the
      Great Game played over the aeons [sic], a never-ending tale of positions and
      relations, starting from an assigned Time Zero, a complex web of encounters,
      drama, mating and conflict." (Hamlet's Mill, p. 177.)

      Reading the first part of this, one is left wondering, "yes, yes--how true".
      But the end, in my case, is always "no, no, too far". That is my take on
      Hamlet's Mill: a yes, a no, a maybe, a question mark. It is a disturbing
      book because it teases you with puzzles that are poorly written.

      In the case of Graham Hancock it is so much easier to see: he writes
      fiction! But with Hamlet's Mill, well, is the connection they are trying to
      make there, or isn't it?

      re: pole

      Have you looked into Saturn as Father Time (with a staff) and the Grim
      Reaper (with scythe)? But be forewarned: while Channel 4 and Dan Norder
      both argue a connection between these, thinking critically about it, there
      is no real reason to connect them. It just "feels right", which I suspect
      is what much of Hamlet's Mill is on about.

      The stars, oh the stars. How they spin their stories around us. Or is it
      the other way around?

      -Chris
    • robyne chamberlain
      I am attaching an email that came to me on my lavender list.... and thought maybe someone on this list might have some information. Thanks Robyne To:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 4, 2003
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        I am attaching an email that came to me on my lavender
        list.... and thought maybe someone on this list might
        have some information.
        Thanks
        Robyne


        To: Lavandula@yahoogroups.com
        From: "John MacGregor" <jonivy@...> |
        Date: Fri, 04 Jul 2003 13:58:48 -0700
        Subject: Re: [Lavandula] Experts on lavender in Old
        Testament
        on 7/4/03 9:44 AM, Susan Robins at
        smr@... wrote:

        > I had a caller who is writing a novel that takes
        place during the time of
        > the Old Testament, and would like e-mail contact
        with lavender historians.

        Way back in 1874, J. Smith speculated that the
        reference to spices ("roshay
        besamim") in Song of Solomon 5:1 might suggest that
        Solomon "had in his
        gardens at Etham all kinds of sweet-smelling plants
        common to Palaestine, as
        also those of South Europe, such as lavender,
        rosemary, sage, thyme, savory,
        marjoram, etc." [Quoted by Molden & Moldenke, p. 52].
        But this is a very
        Eurocentric idea of someone with very little knowledge
        of the botany of the
        Holy Land.

        The sweet-smelling lavenders we know--especially
        Lavandula angustifolia and
        L. latifolia and their hybrids--are native to the
        mountains of southern
        Europe., and it is highly unlikely that they had
        reached the Holy Land by
        the eighth century B. C.

        Michael Zohary (p. 35) notes that (unspecified)
        "species of lavender
        (Lavendula) [sic.]"... are among the "many tropical
        annuals and perennials
        that grow in wadi beds, rock crevices , and other
        sites" of the Jordan and
        Aravah Valleys. But the fragrance of the species
        native to the region (L.
        stoechas, L. coronopifolia, L. pubescens, etc.) have
        "medicinal" aromas that
        could hardly be compared with the "sweet" spices like
        cinnamon,
        frankincense, myrrh, spikenard, and the other incense
        fragrances commonly
        used in Biblical times.

        I can find not one single modern authority that
        suggests any word in the Old
        Testament refers to any kind of lavender.

        It is my opinion that any reference to "lavender" in a
        novel set in Old
        Testament times would be a blatant anachronism.

        John MacGregor, List Owner
        South Pasadena, CA 91030 USA
        USDA zone 9 Sunset zones 21/23
        jonivy@...






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