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Re: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram

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  • gphx
    (square root(5) + 1) / 2 = 1.618.... Darrin ... From: Axe Kooi To: sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 12:56 AM Subject: RE:
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 5 10:36 AM
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      (square root(5) + 1) / 2 = 1.618....
       
      Darrin
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Axe Kooi
      Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 12:56 AM
      Subject: RE: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram

      Barry,

      When I looked at the post, i saw you are dealing with something i was too.

      Please be aware of the fact that square root of 5 seems like phi but it is
      not exactly so....
      the angle in the pentagram which comes close is 54 degrees, but 2*26.565 (2*
      sqr(5))=53.13 degrees.
      Too a diggerence much to build on, im sure.
      However it is ooone of the angles found in the 3-4-5 triangle, im sure the
      Mexican labourers use equipment with this ratio's. At least architects do.

      If I am wrong, please correct me. I couldn't read the picture of the piramid
      so well.

      Axe



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Barry Carroll" <palladin@...>
      To: <sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2001 10:39 PM
      Subject: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram


      > dan--
      > here is that bit i told you about
      > re why the pentagram might be used as a builders mark.
      > look at the attachments.
      > May be they are old hat to you, maybe not.
      >
      >  Also this stuff might leave some readers behind,
      > but my intention is just the opposite.
      > To Neoplatonists and the folks they followed after, see certain
      > shapes as the building blocks of the universe and sacred builders
      > in  that tradition have tried to pattern their work after God's example.
      > That's why this subject keeps coming around.
      >
      > The first digram is attributed to Swede, Tons Brunes
      > and is out of Mysteries of the Great Pyramid.
      >
      > I'm not sure if you can read the tiny text, but
      > I also color coded it so as to make clearer his point.
      >
      > The ratios that make up the square root relationships
      > shown, are the relationships between the hypotanuse
      > and the base of the triangles I've highlighted.
      >
      > This is supposed to show their origins by construction
      > using only geometry without measurement.
      > There are also tricks you can play with areas of the root rectangles
      >  that we are not going to talk about now.
      >
      > The pink and the green show the root 2 and the root 5 respectively.
      > You can see how the patternboard also yields smaller subdivisions of
      > the original triangles
      >
      > Also shown is the start of a pentagram inscribed in a circle
      > marked to illustrate the Phi or golden section ratio .
      >
      > Below it is a pentagon in a circle.
      > In blue, the side and base of that triangle are in  the root 3 ratio.
      >
      > I don't understand what is being said in the part
      > that shows the angles in the diagram as being
      > functions of Phi. It looks like trig.
      > Can i get some help on that?
      >
      > Phi and the pentagon also have properties that are linked to
      > the structure of the Pyramid.
      > A simple illustration of one appears in the second attachment
      > taken from The Power of Limits--
      > a picture is worth 10,000 words.
      >
      > I think Roland's post hits the nail on the head here:
      >
      > It seems the key element is the triangle
      > in relation to the circle or spherical
      > coordinates and the discovery and use of
      > trigonometric ratios and triangulation.
      >
      > As you know, I'm very fond of what you can do if you base
      > the size of your circle on  the circumference of the Earth .
      >
      > Re the search for tools:
      > A set of draftsman's triangles is pretty handy in planning and design.
      > Beyond that, that knotted cord, the so-callerd "ropestretcher's triangle",
      > is quite helpful as a field instrument in getting the angles right
      > as well as the proportions we have looked at in these diagrams.
      > Do you know  this tool from pictures?
      > I've seen Mexican laborers use one of these things to check the forms
      > for the slabs of suburban tract homes right here in Austin.
      > Before that, I thought they
      >  went out with the Pyramids--or the Cathedrals anyway!
      >
      > best wishes,
      > B

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    • Axe Kooi
      Aha! I get the point! Thanx, Axe ... From: gphx To: sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 7:36 PM Subject: Re: [sl] Megalithic
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 5 11:59 PM
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        Aha!  I get the point!
        Thanx,  Axe
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: gphx
        Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 7:36 PM
        Subject: Re: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram

        (square root(5) + 1) / 2 = 1.618....
         
        Darrin
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Axe Kooi
        Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 12:56 AM
        Subject: RE: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram

        Barry,

        When I looked at the post, i saw you are dealing with something i was too.

        Please be aware of the fact that square root of 5 seems like phi but it is
        not exactly so....
        the angle in the pentagram which comes close is 54 degrees, but 2*26.565 (2*
        sqr(5))=53.13 degrees.
        Too a diggerence much to build on, im sure.
        However it is ooone of the angles found in the 3-4-5 triangle, im sure the
        Mexican labourers use equipment with this ratio's. At least architects do.

        If I am wrong, please correct me. I couldn't read the picture of the piramid
        so well.

        Axe



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Barry Carroll" <palladin@...>
        To: <sacredlandscapelist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2001 10:39 PM
        Subject: [sl] Megalithic Pentagram


        > dan--
        > here is that bit i told you about
        > re why the pentagram might be used as a builders mark.
        > look at the attachments.
        > May be they are old hat to you, maybe not.
        >
        >  Also this stuff might leave some readers behind,
        > but my intention is just the opposite.
        > To Neoplatonists and the folks they followed after, see certain
        > shapes as the building blocks of the universe and sacred builders
        > in  that tradition have tried to pattern their work after God's example.
        > That's why this subject keeps coming around.
        >
        > The first digram is attributed to Swede, Tons Brunes
        > and is out of Mysteries of the Great Pyramid.
        >
        > I'm not sure if you can read the tiny text, but
        > I also color coded it so as to make clearer his point.
        >
        > The ratios that make up the square root relationships
        > shown, are the relationships between the hypotanuse
        > and the base of the triangles I've highlighted.
        >
        > This is supposed to show their origins by construction
        > using only geometry without measurement.
        > There are also tricks you can play with areas of the root rectangles
        >  that we are not going to talk about now.
        >
        > The pink and the green show the root 2 and the root 5 respectively.
        > You can see how the patternboard also yields smaller subdivisions of
        > the original triangles
        >
        > Also shown is the start of a pentagram inscribed in a circle
        > marked to illustrate the Phi or golden section ratio .
        >
        > Below it is a pentagon in a circle.
        > In blue, the side and base of that triangle are in  the root 3 ratio.
        >
        > I don't understand what is being said in the part
        > that shows the angles in the diagram as being
        > functions of Phi. It looks like trig.
        > Can i get some help on that?
        >
        > Phi and the pentagon also have properties that are linked to
        > the structure of the Pyramid.
        > A simple illustration of one appears in the second attachment
        > taken from The Power of Limits--
        > a picture is worth 10,000 words.
        >
        > I think Roland's post hits the nail on the head here:
        >
        > It seems the key element is the triangle
        > in relation to the circle or spherical
        > coordinates and the discovery and use of
        > trigonometric ratios and triangulation.
        >
        > As you know, I'm very fond of what you can do if you base
        > the size of your circle on  the circumference of the Earth .
        >
        > Re the search for tools:
        > A set of draftsman's triangles is pretty handy in planning and design.
        > Beyond that, that knotted cord, the so-callerd "ropestretcher's triangle",
        > is quite helpful as a field instrument in getting the angles right
        > as well as the proportions we have looked at in these diagrams.
        > Do you know  this tool from pictures?
        > I've seen Mexican laborers use one of these things to check the forms
        > for the slabs of suburban tract homes right here in Austin.
        > Before that, I thought they
        >  went out with the Pyramids--or the Cathedrals anyway!
        >
        > best wishes,
        > B

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
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